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May 01, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-01

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y1,1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'I

U.S. discloses allied offensive

Johnson pushe

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BULLETIN
SAIGON (Y) - Allied forces
fought North Vietnamese reg-
ulars in savage battles south of
the demilitarized zone for the
second straight day, military
spokesmen reported early today.
Fighting broke out yesterday
below the eastern flank of the
zone separating North and
South Vietnam. Three battles
erupted around Dong Ha, 11
miles south of the DMZ, and a
fourth near Quang Tri City,
eight miles farther south.

SAIGON (AP)-South Vietnamese
troops have swept into the south-
?rn part of A Shau Valley as U.S.
air cavalrymen fight down from
the north, tightening the squeeze
:n that North Vietnamese strong-
aold, U.S. officers reported yester-
day.
Slightly lifting security wraps
on the operation that opened
April 19, officers in Da Nang, on
the coast 50 miles east of the
valley, said the South Vietnam-
ese ran into light resistance while
entering Monday.
Troops of the U.S. 1st Air Cav-
)lry Division reported little oppo-
sition in the first three days of

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LBJ's

draft group

hau Valley
he operation, 'but security has I
prevented any report on their
progress since. A k
The lack of resistance indi-
'ated that the main North Viet- for hl-
namese force has not yet been en-
countered or that it pulled out
into nearby Laos in the past few WASHINGT
weeks of relentless bombing by the Johnson laun
eight-engine B52s of the Strategic Jay for quick
Air Command. a plan for pa
Informed sources said that for asic change i
the past two days the Stratofort- rency in more
resses have been pounding sus- In a special
pected troop concentrations in Johnson said
Laos just to the west of the A a leader in the
ShauValley. ;iations which
Shau Vlley.Should be one
The valley, 25 miles long with to ratify it.
its northern end about 25 miles The admini
Southwest of Hue, has beennde- adoption of th
scribed by U.S. officials as North this year.
Vietnam's largest base in South "We believe
Vietnam. well in Cong
For weeks, the North Vietnam- 3ations of tha
use were reported building up sup- the aisle," sai
flies and troops in the valley, pos- Joseph Califan
sibly for an offensive against Hue, If ratified by
the old imperial capital, or other 80 per cent w
cities in the far north.
Only scattered clashes were re-
ported elsewhere in South Viet-I
nam yesterday. ,
In Saigon, reports circulated
again of a possible enemy attack
or shellings of allied installations.
They appeared to arise from the byvs.
fact that today is May Day, an
important Communist holiday.
Generally, however, enemy ac-
tion in South Vietnam has not o aro
3ome at predicted times.
U.S. military officials reported MARCH A
that latest intelligence advice in- Calif. -IP) -
:icates that North Vietnamese Dwight D. E
regulars now make up at least 70 fered a mild
oer cent of the enemy's organized probably willl
Iombat forces in South Vietnam. f l w

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WASHINGTON (iP)-Draft chief
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey revealed
Monday that President Johnson's
recent rejection of proposed
sweeping changes in the Selective
Service System followed the re-
port of a special task force ap-
pointed by the President.
The task force-composed of
Hershey, former Secretary of De-
Fense Robert S. McNamara and
former Budget Director Charles
L. Schultze-was created to study
the system after the report of a
White House advisory commission.
1967 ENDORSEMENT
Johnson originally endorsed the
commission's operational plans for
Thanges in March, 1967, in a mes-
sage to Congress. The suggestions
included a youngest-first reversal
of the order of induction and a
return to a lottery-type system of
selection.
But he withheld endorsement of
the structural proposals: to cen-
ralize the system, replacing its
4,000 local boards with 300 to 500
area boards; to replace its 56 state
and territorial headquarters with
eight regional offices; and to mod-
ernize and standardize it with
nechanized data processing.
Next, Johnson appointed the
task force to study the system. Al-
though the group completed its
report last January, and the Pres-
ident has seen and approved it,
the report was not made public
until Monday, Hershey said.
'NOT NEWSWORTHY'
' Hershey said the only reason it
was withheld was that he "didn't
think it was newsworthy."
The task force did recommend
some 20 improvements in the
draft system, mainly in procedure.-
Some are being implemented, Her-

shey said, but most are stalled for
lack of money.
Congress in June renewed and
revised the basic draft law-which
spells out the national-state-local
structure-leaving that structure
intact.
By October, Hershey said Mon-
lay, the Task Force had worked
out its position that the present
system should be continued... .
Hershey said his agency had
great influence on the task force.
"We had the best kind of repre-
sentation. We were able to sell
them, to tell them, to educate
them, whatever you want to call
it."

rON (A')-President
ched a drive yester-
U.S. ratification of
aper gold-the first
n international cur-
than two decades.
message to Congress,
the United States, as
e five years of nego-
h led to the plan,
of the first nations
iistration looks for
he plan by Congress
this will be greeted
ress and have indi-
t from both sides of
d White House aide
0no,
y 65 nations with an
weighted vote in the
bIt
light,
IR FORCE BASE,
Former President
isenhower has suf-
heart attack and
be hospitalized here
eeks, the base said
r-old soldier-states-'
olf Monday morning
home at Palm Ds
south. After being
anceled an appoint-
t from King Olav of
alled for his doctors.
ining him at home,
him flown here by
d a good day with no
the hospital bulletin
ressure has remained
as no fever. He has
y Mrs. Eisenhower."
s heart attack,
where in 1955 while
nt and in 1965.
n said bulletins on
condition will be is-
oximately 9:30 a.m.
ily and there will be
beyond what is in
ere instructed to put
in writing, and told
ht or might not be
future bulletins.

[nternational Monetary Fund, the
agreement will represent the first
3asic change in IMF operations
since the Fund was established by
;he Bretton Woods conference of
1944.
The new money would take the
form of a bookkeeping entry on
government and IMF books and
would be called officially a Spe-
3ial Drawing Right, or SDR in the
Fund. Individual citizens would
never see it.
It would be created when and as
needed to supplement convention-
al world money-gold, dollars and
British pounds-and the Upited
States would receive one fourth of
any money created.
The new international money
plan would set up only the ma-
chinery for cranking out SDR's or
paper gold.
FOR WORLD TRADE
An 85 per cent vote of the 107
member nations which make up
the IMF would be required to cre-
ate the money when it is needed
to finance wbrld trade.
\ The United States, with a 2
per cent vote, and the six Euro-
pean Common Market nations,
with more than 16 per cent, would
have veto power.
Officials expect formal ratifica-
tion of the plan by the required
95 governments early next year
but declined to predict when the
new money might be created.
$1 OR $2 BILLION
Frederick L. Deming, under sec-
retary of the Treasury for mone-
-ary affairs, said the United States
foresees a need for $1 billion to $2
billion yearly in paper gold.
France has thus far been cool to
the new plan but officials said the
agreement can go into effect with-
out the French, who control 4.27
per cent of the IMF's weighted
vote.
This would be the first time
that a new type of money was de-
liberately created by international
edict.
Secretary of the Treasury Hen-
ry H. Fowler is scheduled to ap-
pear tomorrow before the House
Banking Committee to urge adop-
tion of the plan.
Johnson coupled his request for
the new money with a fresh ap-
peal to Congress for approval of
the 10 per cent tax surcharge.
But Sen. William E. Proxmire,
D-Wis., chairman of the Senate-
House Economic Committee, call-
ed for vigorous spending cuts in-
stead of a tax increase.

World news roundup

-By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Formal nego-
tiations, in the nation-wide tele-
phone strike resumed yesterday
for the first time since the 13-
day-old walkout began and pros-
pects were reported hopeful for
an agreement within 24 hours.
"We are now seeing eye to eye
on wage levels that the union can
live with," Joseph A. Beirne, pres-
ident of the striking AFL-CIO
Communications Workers said
after talks with the Bell System.
'I * *
WASHINGTON - Representa-
tives of the Poor People's Cam-
paign calling on some of the most'
powerful men in government con-
tinued to get red carpet treatment
yesterday but their leader insisted
"We don't just want sympathy,
we want action."

Taking stock on the campaign's
second day, the Rev. Ralph Aber-
nathy assured his followers that
polite receptions and declarations
of good intentions won't sway him.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. - A
resolution will be handed in here
today to have the U.N. General
Assembly endorse a treaty pro-
posed by the Soviet. Union and the
United States to prevent the
spread of nuclear weapons.
Nineteen sponsors are already
lined up for it: the Soviet Union,
the United States and Britain;
Finland, Denmark, Iceland . and
Norway; Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia,
Hungary, Poland and Mongolia;
Austria, Canada, Ireland and the
Netherlands; Iran, Iraq and Mo-
rocco.

for severai we
yesterday.
The 77-yea
man played g
at his winter1
ert, 40 miles
taken ill, he ca
nent for a visi
Norway and ca
After examb
they ordered1
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"He has had
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This was hi
His othersv
he was preside
A spokesma
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and 4 p.m. dai
no commentl
the bulletins.
Newsmen w
any questionsi
that they mig
answered in i

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