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July 31, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-07-31

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 31 1968

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLI
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E TI

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The,
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by, 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
tices may be published a maximum
of two times on request; Day Cal-
endar items appear only once. Stu-;
dent organization notices are not '
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum
mer Previews - "Hidden World (The
Study of Insects)," "Miss Goodall and
the Wild Chimpanzees," Multipurpose
Rm., Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
,epartment of Political Science Films
on Canada - "Northwest Neighbours,"
"Fraser's River," "Above the Timber-
line," "Canada: Unity or Division?",
Multipurpose Rm., Undergraduate) Li-
brary, 7:00 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Paul Heideman, Bassoon, School of Mu-
sic Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
CIC Lecture - Prof. Yuen-ren Chao,{

Members of the Faculties, at 1:20 p.m.
in Rm. 2071 Natural Science Bldg.,
where they may robe.
Students of the Various Schools and
Colleges, in Natural Science Bldg. as
follows:
Section A - Literature, Science, and
the Arts: Front part of auditorium,
west section; Education: Front part
of auditorium, center section; Archi-
tecture: Front party of auditorium,
center section (behind Education);
Law: Front part of auditorium, east
section; Dearborn Campus: Front part
Law).
Section B -Graduate School: Doc-
tors, Rm. 1053; Candidates, Front part
of auditorium, west section (behind
Professionals); Professionals: Front part
of auditorium, west section (behind
LS&A); Masters: Rear part of audi-
torium.
Section C - Public Health, Room
2054; Engineering, Room 2042; Business
Administration, Room 2042 (behind En-
gineering); Music, Room 2033, north
end; Pharmacy, Room 2033 (behind mu-
sic); Nursing, Room 2033 (behind
Pharmacy); Dentistry, Room 2033 (be-
hind Nursing); Medicine, Room 2033
(behind Dentistry); Natural Resources,
Room 2023, west end; Social Work,
Room 2023, center (behind Natural
Resources); Flint College, Room 2023,
east end (behind Social Work).
March into Hill Auditorium, 1:45 p.m.
Academic Dress.
Doctoral'
Examinations
Ibrahim Mahmoud Ibrahim Hussein,
Education, Dissertation: "The Effect of
School Size upon Teacher Satisfaction

Inference, and the Linear Functional Pine Tree Society for Crippled Chil-
Relation with Errors in Both Variables," dren and Adults, Bath, Maine - Speech
on Wed., July 31 at 10 a.m. in Rm. 1020 Clinician, BA with exper. pref.; Hear-
Angell Hall. Chairman: W. A. Ericson. ing Clinician, MA or BA with CCC in
Speech Path. or Audiol. and expe.;

William Andrew Groening, Mathe-
matics, Dissertation: "Some Quasi-
Analytic Classes of Analytic Functions,"
on Wed., July 31 at 1 p.m. in Rm. 1020
Angell Hall. Chairman: P. L. Duren.
Dale Ralph Johnson, Far Eastern Lan-
guages afid Literatures, Dissertation:
"The Prosody of Yuan-Ch'U," on Wed.,
July 31 at 3 p.m. in Rm. 316 Gunn
Bldg. Chairman: J. I. Crump.
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SABE
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings received by.
General Division by mail and phone;
please call 764-7460 for further infor-
mation:

Audiologist, MA with CCC; Language
Therapist, MA with CCC pref.; Speech
Pathologist, MA with CCC pref,
Committee to Promote Action (COM-
PACT), Flint, Mich. - Volunteer
Coord., BA in a Soc. Set. plus 2 yrs.
'exper. with social agencies using vol-
unteers, to coord. volunteer prog. at
neighborhood center.
Local Organization, Ann Arbor, Mich.
-Openings in retailing: store mgmt.,
merchandising, interior displap; also
openings for designers, editorial and
operational personnel in book and mag.
publishing. Exper. pref.
City of Detroit - Supervising Com-
munity Services Asst., deg. in suc. set.,
educ., or psych. plus considerable ex-
per. in case work, grp. work, guid. and
couns.; ,Medical Record Librarian I and
II, cert. or deg. in Med. Record Lib.
Sci. plus exper.

0

NAIOAm._._L odP

NOW
SHOWING

O X .APTERN .7EATRES-
375 No. MAPLE RD, "769.130

Compl9te Showings
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:05 - 9:15

WEDNESDAY SHOWING- 3:00 - 5:00 - 7:05 - 9:15

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
Our man-on-the-street people are, from left to right, top row: Sue Weinstein, Mary Alice Godfrey, Thomas Walker, Louise Rehling;
bottom row: Jay Horsehak, Susan Mattross, Randy Hill, and Billy Aplin.
On politicians and their politics

of the University of California, will lec- and Participation," at 9 a.m., Wed.,
ture on "The Chinese Language and July 31, in Rm. 3001 University High
Chinese Sign Systems",, Wed., July 31, School. Chairman: D. H. Cooper.
in Rackham Amphitheatre, 4th Floor
Rackham, 8;00 p.m. Robert Jonathan Wolosin, Social Psy-
chology, Dissertation: "Self- and So-
University Musical Society Recital -- cial Perception and the Attribution of
Rudolf Firkusny, Pianist, Rackham Lee- Internal States," Wed., July 31 at 10
ture Hall, 8:30 p.m. a.m. in I,S.R. fourth floor conference
room, Chairman: E. Burnstein.

lk

General Notices
PLANS FOR SUMMER
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
Sunday, August 4, 1968 2:00 p.
Time of Assembly: 1:15 p.m.
Places of Assembly:

Roger Leo Wright, Mathematics, Dis-
sertation: Unidentifiability, Bayesian
ORGANIZATION
MOTICP

By THOMAS R. COPI
and PAT O'DONOHUE
Recent reports on the Ameri-
can political scene note that
youth, as a group, remains dis-
enchanted with the current
presidential campaign and with
politics in general. It's hard to
tell if this is true from a survey
on the Diag.
Sue Weinstein, a first year
grad student in the School of
Social Work, and a registered
voter, says she is "disillusioned"
by this year's political activity.
She adds that as an alternative
to the front-running represen-
tatives of "the System" -
Richard Nixon and Hubert
Humphrey - Eugene McCar-
thy "doesn't look that good."
She noted that "he didn't'come
out for civil rights until (Rob-
ert) Kennedy's death."
But if November's contest for
the White House comes down
to a choice between Humphrey
and Nixon, she'll vote for Hum-
phrey, "because he's less emo-
tional and more intelligent
than Nixon."
A senior in the literary col-
lege, Mary Alice Godfrey is also
a registered voter. She admits
that the race will probably
come down to Humhprey vs.
Nixon, in which case she "just
wouldn't vote."
Although Miss Godfrey "ac-
tively supported" the McCarthy
candidacy "at first," she no
longer does, since "he's begin-
ing to be wishy-washy in his
stand on the war and is not as
dynamic as he first appeared
to be."
Jay Horschak, a graduate
student in English, has differ-
ent views on McCarthy. "I like"
his optimism, his style, his lack,
of cynicism," he said.
Although Horschak thinks
McCarthy's chances for nomin-
ation are "slim", he supports
him, and says McCarthy dif-
fers from the other candidates
"in his return to certain Amer-
ican ideals which have been
lost in the rush, like the con-

cept that big government is not
necessarily the best govern-
ment."
Horschak, a registered voter,
isn't sure what he'll do in the
event of a Humphrey-Nixon
contest.
Also a graduate student in
English, and also a registered
voter, Thomas Walker main-
tains he'll vote for McCarthy
whether he's nominated or not.
Walker asserts many others will
go along with him in writing-in
McCarthy for President, and
that such votes could be taken
as "votes against Humphrey."
Although Walker would sup-
port Nelson Rockefeller, he ad-
mits that many independent
and first-time voters "can't
support any of the current can-
didates."
Billy Aplin, an Ann Arbor
resident who frequentsrthe
Diag, says he doesn't support
any of the candidates, and
won't vote no matter what hap-
pens at the political conven-
tions.
He adds that "they've all got
a good line, but nothing to of-
fer." And although he thinks
that McCarthy would make the
best President "for the States,"
he strongly disagrees with Mc-
Carthy's stand on the war in
Vietnam.
Aplin maintains that the war
is necessary on two counts.
First, American forces fighting
in Asia will prevent a coalition
of Asian nations under the
aegis of Communism, which
would be a direct threat to the
U.S. Also, Aplin adds, it's neces-
sary to have American men
fighting in Asia since there
'f

would be no place for them in
the U.S. should the war end.
He notes there aren't even
enough jobs for those here now,
and "where would they put
those boys when they come
back?"
Louise Rehling, a junior in
the literary college, holds that
"'the System' stinks even if
McCarthy does get nominated-
it will be just as corrupt as it
is now." She adds youth are so
disinterested in the campaign,
they don't really care at all
who is elected, though she ad-
mits that the disaffection would
be greater if anyone but Mc-
Carthy were to win.,
"The McCarthy people say
they don't really care if they
win, they just want their views
to be heard," Miss Rehling says.
"But no one really gives a damn
if they're just heard," she con-
cludes.
Susan Mattross, who just fin-
ished her first year at the Uni-
versity, noted that the nomina-
tion of McCarthy at the Demo-
cratic Convention "won't make
much difference."
Although she's not old enougn
to vote, she says she probably
wouldn't anyway, since "there's
no choice between Humphrey
and Nixon."
A former student at Chicago's
Roosevelt University, Randy Hill
said he hopes Ronald Reagan
will be elected "because then
the end will come faster -
'the System' will die."
He adds the re-election -f
Lyndon Johnson would produce

the same effect. Hill says that
although he doesn't agree with
the views of George Wallace,
he likes "the fact that he's
raising an alternative to the
major parties."
He feels that the young peo-
ple who have been trying to
work within 'the System' "are
becoming disenchanted and dis-
illusioned with it.
"Look where it's left every-
thing," he says. '
Seareh-ing
In 'U' fee a
(Continued from Page 1
million general operating budget.
Assuming the general budget cov-
ers the total cost of education,
student fees represent about 28
per cent of total educational costs.
Educational costs include more
than what is termed "direct in-
structional costs." In addition,
students are paying part of the
"indirect costs" ."of student and
administrative services, such as
maintaining the libraries and
museums.
When administrators set tuition
scales, they consider what per-
centage of the general budget stu-
dents must pay. The amount re-,
mains stable or rises depending on
the state budget appropriations.
Consequently, when the Regents

i

Regents and Ex-Regents, President:
and Other Executive Officers, Minister, . ...:: .sc
Speaker, Honorary Degree Recipients, USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
1:20 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Rm, of NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
th Mchga iign h Lage aamz heeoo teyyRm my frecognized and registered student or-
the Michigan League where they may niratios only. Forms are available
in room 1011 SAB.
Deans, Directors, and Other Admin- . . .
istrative Officials taking active part in UM Rifle Club, Wed., 7-9 p.m., ROTC
the exercises, at 1:20 p.m. in the Hus- Rifle Range, shooting open to students
'sey Rm. of the Michigan League, where and faculty
they may robe.
University Lutheran Chapel, July 31,
10:00 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw. Devotion
Service by Rev. Charles Smith. Holy
Communion. 8:30 p.m. Discussion, "The
Man for Others.
Newman Student Association, Biafra/
Relief Fund Bucket Drive, on Campus,
Wed., July 31.

Frank Sinatra is an pxcitingly aiferent
Sinatra in an adult story of a city.

4

approve a tuition hike, as they
did this year, they are approving
an arbitrary figure which repre-
sents no standard student share
of direct or indirect educational
cost.
While direct education ex-
spenses (or instructional costs)
and indirect expenses are dif-
ferentiated within the general,
budget, both student revenues and
state appropriations are combined
to for the general fund before
any expenditures are made.

3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NAT'ONt GrNERAt PCTURESP REtsNTS.
JAMES DEBBIE MAURICE
GARNER REYNOLDS RONET

Tony Franciosa
T "THE SWEET RIDE
1-3-5-7-9

I

4-

HRUFES PA A 01$!
HEROES!r
THEYNE MERCENA /EL TH1fEY~fE 117 00*JOB!

STARTS TOMORROW - 6:30 - 8:00 - 9:30

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Continuous from 1:00 p.m.
TWO Cinema Greats.
ACorloPond Producfon
Antonioni's
BLOW-UP
Vanessa Redgrave
David Hemmings "Sorah Miles
COLOR
#fCOMMf'010E0 TORMATUJRE A001(KE5I
A Premier Prodc~tons C.1 Inc. Releose
shown at
2:35 -6:00-9:20
HE'S AN ODD BALL!
AWAY OUT KOOK!
A NUT!
...HE'S

0

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3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
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Wed., Sat., Sun.
1-3-5-7-9
Mon, Tues., Thurs., Fri.
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A MAN
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EXCLUSIVE AREA SHOWING
Starts TONITE!
IF YOU'RE THIRTY,
YOU'RE THROUGH!
52% of the Nation is under
25 and they've got power.
That's how Max Frost at.
24, became President of
the United States.
This is perhaps the most
unusual motion picture
you will ever see! *
Shelley Chritopher-iane
WINTERS * * ARSI

VANESSA REDGRAVE
DAVID WARNER

PLUS
We guarantee you'll talk and talk
and talk about this Controversial
Adult Motion Picture!

5 MORGAy

shown at
1:00 - 4:25 - 7:4

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NOW thru
Thursday

r 5CctLQn in ern 'oo ix

DIAL
NO 5-6290

Meto Gokhvyn Mayer presents An Everett Freeman Poduction
Doris Day-Robert Morse-Terry-Thomas-PatrickO'Neal

startng G
-TDICK GREGORY
ROBERI HOOKS-DON MURRAY-DIANEV'ARSI

i

METRO GOLDWYN~MAYERPresents
A GEORGE ENGWND PRODUCTION
ROD TAYLOR
JIM BROWN,

miff]

Shown at 1:00 - 3-'00 - 5:00 - 7:05 - 9:10
Starts FRIDAY
PALOMAR PICTURES INTERNATIONAL a
waaumgm~ mwU ga-iwg

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