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July 30, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-07-30

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, July 30, 1968

D ibeek: Moscow

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press special Correspondent
To the Soviet Communist
party leaders, the Czechoslovak
who personifies, resistance to
their dictation must be the
prime example of an "apparat-
chik" gone wrong.
Alexander Dubcek's back-
ground, his training, his care-
ful schooling in Moscow's top
party school, all should have,
molded him into a perfect
model of a Moscow-oriented
Communist leader, a depend-
able member of the apparatus
who would never fail to do the
Kremlin's bidding.
It hasn't turned out that
way. Dubcek has become a sym-
bol of Czechoslovak hopes for
liberation from Moscow domin-
ation, hopes for a freer society
within the framework of a
Communist regime, and hopes
for relief from the economic
stagnation brought on by the

stifling atmosphere of a Soviet-
model bureaucracy.
The Czechoslovaks once were
skeptical about Dubcek because
of his background. Now they
are singing his praises and vow-
ing total support for him in
his tense showdown with the
entire leadership of the Soviet
Communist party.
Dubcek's long, needle-pointed
nose has been the subject of af-
fectionate comment by Czecho-
slovaks, who say of him that
when he is coming on stage for
a public appearance the audi-
ence sees the nose first and
then the rest of the man.
"But it is a strong nose," a
Czechoslovak willadd, admir-
ingly. It adds character to a
handsome face and makes his
confident grin all the more in-
fectious.
In the five years since he en-
tered the top leadership in
Czechoslovakia after becoming

man gone
first secretary of the Commun- Alexa
ist party in Slovakia, Dubcek the Jan
developed a style which grad- to carry
ually set him apart from the the Naz
ordinary "apparatchik." He was kill
managed to appear 'to be a vakia of
faithful servant of hard-line, rAlexanc
Stalin-like Antonin Novotny, same sk
then boss of the Czechoslovak After
party and president of the na- came a
tion, while at the same time Trencin
extending a meagure of protec- party a
tion to voices of dissent in his a distr
native Slovakia. Today he is an then or
exponent of public give and the Slo
take. Unlike other Communist to men
leaders, he exposes himself to Central
public questioning and rubs el- time he
bows with people of all shades course:
of opinion. - In 1
The recurrent homesickness Moscow
of Dubcek's father first pre- party's
vented Alexander Dubcek from He was
being born an American citizen in 1958
and then from becoming a per- On h
manent subject' of the Soviet Dubcek
Union. Dubcek's father, a car- the ray
penter, had emigrated to the with tt
United States before World War proval
I in search of work, and re- came c
mained in America until after and a
the war. Before Alexander was presidia
born, however, the Dubceks re- party.
turned to Czechoslovakia. In S
The future leader of the par- partyt
ty was born Nov. 27, 1921 in ness wh
Uhrovek, a village in western regime
Slovakia. His father was cap- not joi
tivated by the notion :of com- and in
munism and in 1925 took 4- and in
year-old Alexander and his protect
brother, Julius, a year older, to tral reg
the Kirghiz Republic in the So- In 19
viet Union. The elder Dubcek with the
had joined an agricultural co- whle so
operative there. his expr
Alexander attended schools in subjects
Frunze and a Soviet high the Sovi
Long
school. Then, in the year of monhs
Munich, 1938, the elder Dub- months
cek decided to return to his na- Dubcek
tive land."A year later, at 17, vet me
Alexander and Julius joined the tion as
outlawed Communist party. At ty chief
the same time Alexander began him "cc
studying mechanical engineer- but care
ing. expected
When the country was taken battlem
over by the Nazis the brothers national
went underground with the par- Brezh
ty. Their father was arrested another
and imprisoned as a member of But the
the Slovak Communist Central with hi
Committee and remained in of bindi
confinement throughout the in Prag
war. Dubcek'

awry

1

nder and Julius joined
Ziska partisan brigade
on guerrilla war against
i occupation, and Julius
ed in a skirmish in Slo-
)n New Year's Day, 1945.
der was wounded in the
kirmish.
the war, Dubcek be-.
laborer in a factory in
a, and stepped up his
ctivity. He soon became
rict party functionary,
ganizational secretary cf
vak party. He moved up
mbership in the Slovak
Committee. At the same
e took a correspondence
in law.
955, Dubcek was sent to
to study at the Soviet
Higher Political School.
graduated with honors
3.
his return from Moscow,
rose quickly through
nks of the party until,
he seal of Moscow's ap-
still upon him, he be-
hief of the Slovak party
member of the central
um of the Czechoslovak
lovakia, Dubcek's rule as
chief lacked the harsh-
hich marked the Novotny
in Prague. Dubcek did
n in persecuting writers
tellectuals for their views,
fact was credited with
ing them from the cen-
gime.
66 he identified himself
economic reformers, even
ending wholly orthodox in
'essions of views on other
,such as relations with
et Union.
before he took over seven
ago on a wave of public
afor economic reform,
had disillusioned his So-
ntors. On Dubcek's selec-
first secretary, Soviet par-
Leonid T. Brezhnev sent
omradely congratulations,"
efully implied that Moscow
d him to protect the
ents of "socialist inter--
lism."'
nev was destined for yet
grave disappointment.
Russians weren't finished
m. They still had hopes
ing him to their will, and
rue, many Czech feared for
s capacity to resist.

WITHOUT A BATTLE:
1,000 infiltraters enter Saigon

S
A'

SAIGON (/P)-A frustrated al-
lied command still finds it hard
to believe that the enemy has
massed troops around Saigon and
sent 1,000 terrorists into the cap-
ital virtually without a major
fire fight.
The- U.S. and South Vietnamese
military brass knew what was
going on but thousands of allied
ground troops sweeping around
the capital could not catch the
enemy in strength or provoke a
major jungle battle that might
save the city from bitter street
fighting.
Allied infantrymen also failed
to trap the enemy when a num-
ber of major units moved to the
northwest to menace the capital
of Tay Ninh Province.
UNDER THE NOSES
The massive movement of mor-
tars, rockets and ammunition is
continuing. The supplies are bur-
ied in caches sometimes right un-
der the noses of allied troops
around the immediate perimeter
of Saigon.
The speed and coordination of
the enemy movements has stirred
frank admiration among some
U.S. officers. They say it is mo-
bile guerrilla warfare at its finest.
But the brass finds it nerve rack-
ing and maddening.
One U.S. officer, a veteran of
Vietnam fighting, gestured help-
lessly at a vast expanse of rice
paddy, swamp, criss-crossing can-
as, villages and pineapple groves,
where he had been searching for
weeks for an enemy battalion just
southwest of Saigon.
Tryout tonight
for local plays
Tryouts for two original one-act
plays by Ann Arbor playwrights
will be held tonight at Canterbury
House beginning at 7:00. The di-
rectgrs, Fritz and Mary Lyon, say
they need actors, technical con-
sultants, people to work on pub-
licity, and all sorts to work on an
improvisational project. Every-
body is welcome - extensive ex-
perience is unnecessary.
The two plays are "Anika," by
Fritz Lyon and "Where Oh Where
Has the Holy Ghost Gone?" by
Peter Griffith. They will be per-
formed August 22, 23 and 24 at
Canterbury House.

"There is a battalion out there
spread out over five square miles,"
he said. "They have. about 350,
men and I'll bet no more than 10
are in any one spot. They're holed
up in tunnels and underground
rooms during the day and then
hit the road at night. The popula-
tion knows where they are but
they won't say. Either they sup-
port the enemy or they are scared
to death of repricals."
A NUISANCE
Senior American officers believe
there are 15,000 enemy troops
within 48 hours march of Saigon.
Dispersed, they are a nuisance,
planting mines and booby traps.
U.S. commanders are waiting
for the time when the scattered
companies merge into battalions
and regiments for the expected
major offensive. This period, when
the units join up and begin mov-
ing in for the big push is the best
and last chance for allied troops
to catch their foe in the open.
One senior U.S. commander said
it would take five divisions to
make the inner defenses of Sai-

gon impregnable. Only two divi- of drowning in their heavy field
sions are on the line. gear.
Viet Cong -infiltrating Saigon The enemy, on the other hand,
pose an even tougher problem moves quietly. Viet Cong guer-
than the battalions in the coun- rillas recently buried a sizable
tryside. weapons cache less than 100 yards
ACCEPT BRIBES from an American infantry com-
pany's pight ambush position.
About 1,000 persons enter Sai- "As far as I'm concerned the
gon daily along the roads and Viet Cong have the night," said
canals leading into the capital. the company commander.
The police are supposed to search HIS OWN FRONT YARD
the hundreds of'trucks and boats.I

4

1
{
r
It

but it is well-known that police
often accept bribes from travelers
who say they want to get to the
market early, and the searches
and roadblocks are not accomp-
lishing their purpose.
Arms and people are hidden at
the bottom of sacks of rice and
beneath baskets of vegetables on
trucks,
U.S. strategists shy the key to
preventing enemy infiltration is
control of the countryside at
night. But some officers say it is
impossible to patrol the waterways
spilling into Saigon's back alleys
because the troops would be con-
stantly falling into canals, splash-
ing noisily and running the risk

Tight-lipped peasants in the
hamlets around Saigon are no
help. American soldiers recently
found an enemy mortar and ex-
plosives cached 150 yards from
the house of a minor South Viet-
namese official.
"You just can't tell me no one
knew that this stuff was being
buried last night or that guy, in
the house doesn't know what's
going on in his own, front yard,"
said a corpqral.
"We just aren't going, to get
anywhere until we get some co-
operation from the people. Man,
if you can't get it in Saigon,
where in hell are you going to get
it in this coui try?"

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORT
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HITS WITH THE SHOCK, OF A
SWITCHBLADE .:'..
KNIFE! I

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STARTS THURSDAY

MAN moom

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-Associated Press

Goodbye, CCCP

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

!SIT HU0 T RUOF,
starring
"fBETiO DICKGRRY
ROBERI HOOKS- DON MURRAY- DiANE VARSI

-I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be.
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
tices may be published a maximum
of two times on request; Day Cal-
endar items appear only once. Stu-
dent organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY,'JULY 30
Day Calendar
School of Music -- Trumpet Student
Recital, School of Music Recital Hall,
12:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Previewst "Interrogation and
Counsel," Justice Under Law - The
Gideon Case," "The Interview," Multi-;
purpose Rm., Undergraduate Library,
1:30 p.m.
*ORGAN IZAT IONI

Department of Classical Studies Lee- Koga, Nagoya; Mr. Yukio Miki, Tokoy; drafting reports; Contract Admin., BS
ture - Dale Brethower, Asst. Chief of MK. Sotoo Mizoguchi, Kawasaki; Mr. Engr. or BBA, MBA pref. Dept. Mgr.,
Reading Improvement Service, The Uni- Nobuyoshi Nakanishi, Tokyo; Mr. Tadao BS in Pharm. or Chem.
versity of Michigan, "Managing Pro- Oki, Chiba; Mr. Hiroshi Takagi, Nishi- State of Michigan -- Medical Labor-
grammed Materials in the Classroom," ku; Mr. Toshikiyo Taketome, Yama- ate Michg, . dical Lab.r
Mr. Miki Sakuma,hKamasaki, Aug. 6-10. Tech, or bacteriol. plus 2 yrs. exper, in
med. lab work
a Cr na r Ct f Political Science Films ~~~

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3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
JAMES DEBBIE MAURICE
GARNER REYNOLDS RONET

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I teparmnenL o Y lt- -" -v il1
on Canada - "Pangnirtung" (Eskimo)i,
"Angotee" (Eskimo), "No Longer Van-
ishing" (India), Multipurpose Rm.,
Undergraduate Library, 7:00 p.m.
School of Music - The Stanley Quar-
tet: Angel Reyes, Violin; Gustave Ros-
seels, Violin; Robert Courte, viola;
Jerome Jelinek, Celko, Rackham Lecture
Hall, 8:00 p.m.
CIC Movie - "Kohayakawa«-ke No
Aki" a Japaneie film will be shown on
Tues., July 30, in Aud. A of Angell Hall
at 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
CIC Lecture - Prof. Yuen-ren Chao,
of the University of California, will lec-
tireon ""The Cne Luage and
Ch~inese Sign Systems ", wed., July 31,
in Rackham Amphitheatre, 4th Floor
Rackhamr 8:00 p.m.
xForeign Visitors

Doctoral
Examinations

Thrall Car Manufacturing Co., Chi-
cago Hts., Ill. - Personnel Generalist,
exper, in personnel admin., employee
rels., training, safety, age 27-35 with
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Alan Edward Guskin, Social Psychol- Local Organization - Personnel Di-
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The Assimilation of Chinese in Thai- eral yrs. exper., will do recruiting, em-
land," on Tues., July 30 at 3 p.m. in ploylnent, training, etc.
Rm. 5046 I.S.R. Chairman: H. C. Kel- -
man.

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Placement.
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings received by
General Division by mail and phone;
please call 764-7460 for further infor-
mation:
Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago,
Ill. Sr. Analyst Intl. Finance MBA
pref. 3 yrs exper.; Marketing Analyst,
deg. plus 3 yrs. exper.; Training Spe-
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pref. plus 2 yr§'.exper. ;Internationalj
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AnialysLt, MBA pref. plus several yr-s.
exper.; Project Asst., BA/BS, academic
abil. to do lib. res., data manipulation,
... _ . . ' '

r CAMPUS

TWO CinemaGreatsI

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BEST
FILM
OF
19661"
National
society
at Film Critics

A Carlo Panel ProducW"
.Antonioni 's
BLOW-UP
Vanessa Redcgrave
David Hemmings-'Sarah Miles
COLOR
I1MI W 0IMATUE AU I(MC s
A Premier Productions Co.,Itnc. Reteose
HE'S AN ODD BALL!
A WAY OUT KOOK!
A NUT!
... HE'S

SEPTEMBER 17-29
MOLIERE'S Directed by
Stephen PQr
" , Adapted b
i$dLI Richard
f t " ' ''Wilbur
# * A delightful satiric romp

ler

INICESIZZ The
an b
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN- Miss
NJOUINCEMENTS is available to offically Buear
recognized and registered student or- nila,7
ganizations only. Forms are available Mr.
in room 1011 SAB. manex
ton
Christian Science Orga ization Tes- Hon d
+;musoy ~sisn- kTh 7:30t-) ,m Ri M r.

following are foreign visitors who
e reached through the Foreign
Programs Office, 764-2148.
terencia Salva Quinay, Dentist,
u of Dental Health Services, Ma-
The Philippines, Juiy 28-31.

PLUS
We guarantee you'll talk and talk
and talk about this Controversial
Adult Motion Picture!

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timony Meeting, 'urs., pu ;. .,in
3545 SAB. ^.1r.
u Cellter
Bach Club'meeting, Thurs,, Aug. 1, Chile,
8:00 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe St., Dr.
Program: A talk by Randolph Smith on Medici
"Bach's Double violin Cdncerto". Jelly zon C
donuts and conversation afterwards. Sho]
For further information call 769-2922 or Mr T;
'761-1682 o rdu H~
I WHEN LIFE SWINGS,
IT'S. . .

r lip llr ,11 40, JL.
Ernest wellington Fuller, Per-
nt Secretary, Ministry of Educa-
and Housing; Belize City, British
uras, July 29-31.
Jose DeYcovic, Head, Computing
r, Catholic University; SantiagO,
Aug. 5.
Jose Cuyekeng, Dean, Colle;e of
ine, Univer ityv of the Eat; Que-$
ity, The Philippines Aug. 6-8.
p Foremen's Study leam, Japan;
adaljiro S uata, Kohe; Mr. Mir-
3ilino, Kanazawa; Mr, Tayoh
ATI
DIAL
NO 2-6264
at
1:00
5:00
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VANESSA REDGRAVE
DAVID WARNER

EXLUSIVE AREA SHOWING
Starts TON ITE !

OCTOBER 1-13
A contemporary approach to
Shakespeared
Directed by Ellis Robb . Music by Conrad Susa

ONE Complete
Showing nightly
at 7:00 P.M.

Distributed by Cinema V

IF YOU'RE THIRTY,
YOU'RE THROUGH!
52% of the Nation is under
25 and they've got power.
That's how Max Frost at.
24, became President of
the Uhited States.
This is perhaps the most
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~Lnlii nuf'hr'iennhar Oino

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DIAL
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Miro.GiAdwyn-Mayer presents An Everett Freeman Production
Doris Day'Robert Morse'ferry-Tomas-PatrickO'Neal
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OCTOBER 15-21
The comedy-fantasy by a master of modern theatre.
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Directed by Jack O'Brien -Music by Bob James
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