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July 25, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-07-25

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 25, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

theatre
Fun and games in Paradiso'

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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By HENRY GRIX
It is really hard not to like
the University Players' produc-
tion of Hotel Paradiso, especial-
ly the riotous first act.
The turn of the century
French bedroom farce by
Georges Feydeau and Maurice
Desvalliers is a wicked blend of
kick in the pants slapstick and
subtle double entendre.
And Peter Glenville's trans-
lation is masterfully faithful to
French sensibilities. The plot is
delightfully complex; the end-
ing is instantly predictable. The
premise is that a man "can't
be responsive to his own wife;"
the conclusion is that man is
too clumsy and stupid to merit
the attention of anyone but his
mate. '
Everyone overacts and the
sets are exquisitely baroque.
However, all the opulence
gets to you after a while. Three
acts of broad farce are too
much for the University Play-
ers to sustain.
And part of Paradiso's prob-
lem is that it is idiomatic.
Classical French' actors have a
knack for exploiting every ges-
tureand slurring every line, to
an extent that seems hopelessly
affected on a stage where Eng-
lish is spoken.
Although the cast seems in-
defatiguable, the audience be-
comes bored by the middle of
the second act and begins to
appreciate only the obvious
sight gags and sound gimmicks.
Redemption glimmers for
moments in the last act, but by
that time the audience has been
entertained and is ready to go
home.
However, some people may
have been ready to leave right
at first. The production opens
with- a rather Annoying and
self-conscious giddiness as the
stage crew giggles and toys
with the lights before dimming
them.
John Slade's whimsical score
is witty enough to set the mood
without the stage crew's ham-
pering hand.
But from the moment James

Hosbein, as M. Boniface, stum-
bles on stage the humor jerks
along.
Director Robert E. McGill
prefers a careful stop and go
approach to a fast-paced one.
He encourages his players, not-
ably Boniface and his would-be
amour Marcelle (Ge o r g e tte
Weremiuk), to indulge in glor
ious, prolonged double takes.
McGill stops the action several
times during the production to
extract every laugh from an
indiscreet situation.
During the first and third
acts, this approach works won-
ders. Boniface turns to address
the audience, but is cut off by
the off-stage yelp of his guard-
ian angel, his wife Angelique.
Angelique, hilariously played
by Gilda Radner, is a tremen-
dous sow of a woman, who
cows her husband, and brays at
everyone she meets.
Of course, Boniface is at-
tracted by the whimpering and
purring of his neighbor's' wife,
Marcelle.
She, in turn,, finds her dry,
husband, M. Cot (Jack Mc-
Laughlin) to be "unresponsive
and insupportable."
And meanwhile, M. Cot's
nephew, Maxime (Michael Fire-
stone), a serious philosophy
student enters and begins to
fancy the Boniface's promis-
cuous maid Victoire (inda
McLaughlin).
The kind of frustrations
building up can only be re-
solved at the Hotel Paradiso, a
dump that offers a "large dis-
count for seasonal bookings."
By the end of the first act,
M. Boniface and Mme. Cot,
Maxime and Victoire, and M.
Cot (by himself) are all headed
for the hotel.
To complicate things, M.
Martin (W. Martin Hunt), a
lawyer who stutters and literal-
ly kicks out every word begin-
ning with c, f, or s, decides to
put up at the hotel with his
four brats, after being ousted
from the Boniface residence.
The second act, then, is the
killer.

Screaming, singing, dancing
and leering were all written
into the rollicking hotel scenes
by Feydeau and Desvalliers.
In the spooky hotel, every-
body runs into everybody else,
gets embarassed, gets scared,
gets bruised, and gets arrested.
In the capsule-sized Lydia
Mendelssohn, all the carrying
ons are overwhelming. Although
the second act set is cleverly
devised, the University is not
equipped with the lighting to
make the "philanderer's park-
dise",very frightening. All the
screaming seems unwarranted.
And McGill's direction pauses
for laughs, when he should be
leaving the audience breathless.
The pace never quickens in the
second act, and thus the sec-
ond act dies.
The third act thrives on a
few witty lines, well delivered
by Boniface and Marcelle, and
it throbs with the reappearance
of Angelique.
But underneath, the act is
more of the same. While it re-
solves the comic conflict in a
delightfully preposterous way,
it should be disposed of as
quickly as possible.
The one device that is never
exhausted during the play is
the energy of the cast. Hosbein
must have as many bruises
from his hilarious falls, as
Charlie Chaplinendured. And
Misses Radner and Weremiuk,
and Mr. Hunt are likewise con-
sistently hilarious.
Furthermore, most of the bit
players did more than carry
their share. Melvyn Puchner,
as the Italian proprieter of the
Paradiso, and Richard Beebe,
as his hotel porter, were espe-
cially noteworthy.

The Daily Official Bulletin is as
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN formbto
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request;Day
Calendar items appears only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270,
THURSDAY, JULY 25
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "Advanced Personnel Officers
Course No. 9", Rm. 141, School of Busi-
ness Administration, 8:15 am. to 10:00
p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar -- "Management of Managers Pro-
gram No. 63", North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to
9:00 p.m.
Department of Speech Summer Con-
ference - Registration, Lobby, Rack-
ham Bldg., 9:00 a.m.; First Session, Am-
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in room 1011 SAB.
Christian Science Organization Tes-
timony meeting, Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Rm.
3545 SAB.
Bach Club Meeting, Thurs., July 25,
8:00 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Speaker: Dr. Richard Crawford, "Bach's
Cantata No. 21 ('Jch hatte viel Bekum-
mernis)" Jelly donuts and conversation
afterwards. For further information
call 769-2922, 761-688, 663-6361 or
769-1605.

* phitheater, Rackham Bldg.; Second
Session, 1:45 p.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Previews-"American Music: From
Folk to Jazz to Pop", Multipurpose Rm.
Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
CIC Lecture - Prof. John Wang, of
the University of Michigan, will lec-
ture on "The First Efforts in China to
Elevate Vernacular Literature," in
Noble Lounge, Oxford Apts., 627 Ox-
ford Rd., at 7:30 p.m.
Department of Speech University
Players - Georges Feydeau's "Hotel
Paradiso," Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
8:00 p.m.
School of Music-University of Michi-
gan Summer Session Band, William
Revelli, Conductor, Hill Aud., 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Astronomy Department Visitors'
Nights. Fri., July 26, 10:00 p.m., Aud. B,'
Angell Hall. Mr. Howard E. Bond will
speak on "High-Velocity Stars," After
the lecture the Student Observatory
on the fifth floor of Angell Hall will
be open for inspection and for tele-
scopic observations of a planetary neb-
ula and a double star. Children wel-
comed, but must be accompanied by
adults.
" /
3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
. Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NATIONAL Ir MR PICTURES PESE .
JAMES DEBBIE MAURICE
GARNER REYNOLDS RONET
HOW SWEt''IT
Technicolor" Panavision9 (
SNATIONAL I3ENERAI, CORPORATION _
FOX EASTERN TNEAREsin
FOR VILLaGE
375No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300
ENDS TUESDAY
1:00 -3:00 -5:00 -7:15 -9:30
PARAMOUNT PICTURES
presents
Jack
Lemmor
Wafer
Mathau.

Student Accounts - Your attention fraction Studies," on Thurs., July 25,
is called to the following rules passed at 10 a.m. in Conf. Rm., first floor, Bio-
Sby the Regents at theirsmeeting on physics Research Div., I.S.T. Chairman:
Feb. 28, 1936: "Students shall pay all C. R. Worthington.
accounts due the University not later
than the last day of classes of each
semester or summer session. Student Placem ent
loans which are not paid or renewed
are subject 'to this regulation; how- BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
ever, student loans not yet due are ex- 3200 SAB
empt. Any unpaid accounts at the closeG
of business on the last day of classesj GENERAL DIVISION
will be reported to the Cashier of the Announcement:
University and Recruiting Visit by Peace Corps Team,
"a) All academic credits will be with-|headquarters at 3524 S.A.B., booths in
held, the grades for the semester or Fishbowl and on Diag. No appts. nec-
summer session just completed will not essary, information, applications, test-
be released, and no transcript of cred- ing, and literature available.
its will be issued.

pub. health educ. plus 5-6 yrs. prof.
exper.
De Vry Institute of Technology, Chi-
cago, Ill. - Positio nson instructional 4
staff in the Electrottics Engrg. Tech.
prog. Seek majors in EE, math, physics.
Industrial and Marine Supply Corp.,
Hazel Park, Mich. - Young man to
handle sales correspondence and direct
mail advertising of the firm. Excellent
chance of becoming part owner.
State of Washington - Personnel
Analyst I, BA deg. in bus. ad., pub. ad.,
soc. sci., or allied field plus 1 yr. exper.
or MA deg. Varied personnel work in
central1 personnel agency.
State of Wisconsin - Asst. Attorney
General, Dept. of Justice, law deg. plus
5 yrs. legal exper., pass Wisc. bar.
Exec. Budget and Mgmt. Officer -
Fed. Aids Expeditor, MA in planning,
pub.dmin. plus 2 yrs. advanced exper.
involving the applic. of fed, funds to i'
var. progs. Hospital Administration
Consultant, MA in hosp. admin includ-

"b) All students owing such accounts
will not be allowed to register in any
subsequent semester or summer session
until payment has been made."
Doctoral

z

Current Position Openings received;
by Generaj Division by mail andj
phone, please call 754-7460 for further
information.

Midwest Research Institute, Kansas
City, Mo. - Bacteriologist, BS deg.,

Examinations
John Kent Blasie, Biophysics, Dis-
sertation: "Frog Retinal Receptor Disk
Membrane Ultrastructure: Electron
Microscope and Low-Angle X-Ray Dif-
- H

Microbiologist, Ph.D., Physiologist/Bio- ing 1 yr. internship and 2 yrs. exper.,
chemist, MS or PhD., Chemists, all deg., or equiv. combination.
levels, Chem. Engr., BS/MS, Regional,
Indus. and Chem. Economists, advanced ENGINEERING DIVISION
deg. req., Chem. Physicist, recent PhD., Make interview appointments at Rm.
Human Factors or Experimental Psy- 128 E., West Engrg. Bldg.
chologist, advanced deg: July 25:
State of Utah, Salt Lake City - As- Westinghouse Electric Corp. - All
sistant Chief, Health Education, MA in ,locations.

DIAL -* .vinPw
5-6290 Ic M STEIL
ENDS TON IGHT
"Mel Brooks'
A Sidney GlzieProdu,,ian
AEmboyE wresR . In Color

X

ai

Metro-Goklwyn-Mayer presents An Everett reeman Protuction
Doris Day-Robert Morse Terry-Thomas -PatrickO'Neal

S NO 2-626~4
E

lATEi

Rule Northwestern's
black housing unfair

i

TODAY!
[he Starlet and the Drifter-
Careening through the
neon-haunts of Iegas..
the velvet traps of llollywood...
the Mfalibu parties...
Crabbing for the brass ring...

EVANSTON, Ill. (P) - North-
western University has revised its
plan to provide separate housing
for Negro students to avoid pos-
sible violations of the 1964 Civil
Rights Act, Roland J. Hinz, dean
of students, announced yesterday.
The original plan, agreed to in
May by university officials after
a 38-hour takeover by Negro stu-
dents of a campus building, was
the first case in which the Civil
Rights Act applied to discrimina-
tion against white persons, a fed-
eral spokesman said.
The new plan, worked out in
talks with federal officials and
Northwestern Negro students, will
give Negro upperclassmen their.
choice of living units but these
units will not ban white students,
Hinz said.
The living together by black
students does not constitute a vio-

lation of the Civil Rights Act,
said Joshua Zatman, a spokes-
man for the Department of,
Health, Education and Welfare.
Only an official university ban on
the basis of race would violate the
law, he added.
The HEW office of civil rights
notified the university in May its
proposed plan was in violation of
the act.
Hinz said about two-thirds of
the 90 to 100 Negro upperclass-
men expected to enroll for Sep-
tember classes have requested
housing with other Negroes. He!
said the other one-third selected'
living quarters scattered through
the campus.
An estimated 70 to 65 incoming
Negro freshmen will receive rand-
om housing assignments, Hinz
said, in compliance with univer-
sity practice.

ii,'

I

!I1

the winning

ticket,..

v ~Co-Starring
Lola Albright
Steve Allen
Jim Backus
Ben'Blue
Pat Paulsen
Screenplay by Directed by
Everett Freeman and Karl Tunberg'e HyAverback
Produced by Everett Freeman and Martin Melcher
(ODJ~ PANAVISION and METROCOLOR 0Q
MGM

-% ; - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 00-

Ul

Couple

TOMORROW!

I } , Ii C tw

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'ft.

L4 4)

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f4.
' I_--

20Ch Cen ur, Fereseni
"THE SWEET RIDE TONY FRANCIOSAMICHAEL SARRAZIN
JACQUEUNE BISSET MI CHELECAREY BOB DENVER.ct,

I

I

Shows at 1 :00 - 3:00
5:00-7:05 -9:10

PANAVISION" COLOR BY DELUXE
-Sggested For Mature Audiences

1

I

U

UNDERGROUND at

r"

-! I

"THE INCIDENT"-STARTS TOMORROW
" 'THE INCIDENT' hits home with express
train impact . . . builds the tension, to an
almost unbearable pitch." "Maybe you can take
-Kathleen Carroll, Daily News care of us, lady- and
maybe we can take
care of you too!"
"A powerful film that drives relentlessly deep.
It's a shocking experience. 'The Incident'"is
brought vividly to life by Larry Peerce, the /
director who tackled race relations so
daringly in 'One Potato, Two Potato.'
The acting is splendid . . . the action holds
your interest throughout. Tony Musante and
Martin Sheen make the hoods "The next white man
terrifyingly real." who insults me gets a
one-way ticket to the
-Frances Herridge, New York Post gaveytrd! t
"It deserves to be seen."

A4

I

A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PROGRAM OF UNUSUAL,
OLD-TIME COMEDY, AND OTHER UNUSUAL FILMS IS

PSYCHEDELIC, ANIMATED, DOCUMENTARY,
PRESENTED EACH WEEKEND.

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENING-11.00 P.M. & 1:00 A.M.-SATURDAY MATINEES 3:00 & 5:00
UNDERGROUND FILM PRQGRAM-Friday and Saturday, July 26-27,
TWO FILMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST THIS WEEK!
"THE PSYCHEDELIC EXPERIENCE" by Dr. Timothy Leary (18 minutes)
Original music score by Ravi Shankar. This is the classic picture depicting the psychedelic experience
based on the "TIBETAN BOOK OF THE DEAD"!
"THE FATAL GLASS OF BEER" with W. C. Fields at his best. (20 minutes)

Including a scene where he sings a sad song to a
wearing mittens.

Mountie, accompanying himself on a zither, while

NIGHT OF THE VAMPIRE - by Peter Mays
using an original electronic score. (9 minutes). A "black
drama" in which a nude Miss Dracula dines on the blood of
some male victims she has stashed in her cave.

BELOW THE FRUITED PLAIN - by Lenny Lipton
(9 minutes) The biting satire on the mind and mores of the
New American husband. "Superb".
LOVE IN - by Lane Films, Music of the Association
(4 minutes) A beautiful poetic documentary on the 1967 Eas-

r"

-Newsweek

MON. thru SAT.-7:00 and 9:00,

SUN.-3:00- 5:00-7:00- 9:00

I

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