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June 27, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-27

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 27, 1969

Pag To HEMIHIGN ~iY husda, un 2, 96

cinema
Dwarfs rescue princess

APA to perform at'U'
seventh Fall Festival'

$227 MILLION:
Seek surplus funds
to feed poor neonle

J I W

r fLomoer)4e60011h
BIG 3 "UNIT SHOW

..,

By RICHARD KELLER SIMON
A little old lady with bulging
eye balls, a wart on her nose,
and a voice designed to make
your teeth freeze, shoves an
apple at Snow White.
What does the foolish, inno-
cent pasty-faced girl do? What
would any girl with a fatal
weakness for poison apples do,
under the circumstances?
She indulges herself, forget"-
ting that you should never take
anything from strangers, par-
ticularily apples.
Walt Disney's Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs, now at
the Michigan, handles this mo-
ment of original sin with all
modesty due to the subject and
the audience: We never see
Snow White bite into the apple.
Instead, we are treated to a
close up of the bulging eye
balls of the little old lady, while
we listen to Snow White's
pathetic gasps'and sighs. The
moment passes, and we hear
the gentle crunch of her bones
as she takes her fall (onto the
floor).
No one has ever toppled from
grace in a more ladylike man-
ner.,
Not every moment in the film
is as tense as this, but what-
ever may be lacking on the
screen Is supplied in full meas-
ure by the audience.
To relive your childhood with
Snow White, the atmosphere
has to be just right. Rarely has
the Michigan Theatre, with all
its Gopher Prairie architecture,
been a finer place.
Bands of kids race up and
down the aisles, going nowhere.
Other kids make loud pro-
nouncements of the num-
ber of bupny rabbits that trail
after Snow White, Disney's an-
swer to St. Francis of Assisi.
And everyone laughs at Dopey
and the turtle.
Meanwhile, archtypal pat-
terns of nearly everything
flicker by on the screen. In
spite of everything the Queen
can think up to murder the
Young Virgin, the powers of
good overcome the powers of
darkness.
Thesgreen pesticide the
Queen pours onto her apple is
not much stronger than DDT;
and she proves no match for
Prince Charming, who appears
right on cue, riding a white
horse, and singing old operetta
musi. Loe destroys Death
(quite an accomplishment and.
a sunset envelops everything.
Even with the sunset, it never
gets campy. The film, is far too
good, and the audience is either
far too young or far too sen-
timental.
Snow White is also far too*
complex a person. Scampering
into the enchanted forest, she
hallucinates alligators charging
her sweet little body, while
monster mouths and fingers ap-
pear from the trees, ready for
the kill.'
In the Dwarves' modest hut,
she relates to objects as a fe-
male version of Mr. Clean
would look at life. But when it
comes to the Dwarves, she has
real problems. She kisses them
all pretty frequently, but al-
ways on top of their shiny bald
heads. Dopey is the only one
who tries to get a legitimate
kiss, but she only laughs at the
poor imbecile, and makes an-
other lunge at his bald spot.
Snow White feels herself too
COR RECTION
The Daily incorrectly re-
ported Wednesday that the Re-
gents at their last meeting
agreed to Join the Association
of American Universities (AAU)
and that the AAU was a newly
formed organization. The AAU

was established in 1900 and
the University is a long stand-
ing member. The Regents have
agreed to support the AAU's ef-
forts in Washington with a
contribution not to exceed
X3,000.

white for the Dwarves (social
outcasts) and tries to mother
a bunch of men, six times her
age.
The Dwarves, themselves,
have only gotten a little sim-
plistic with age (that's how it
is with morality plays.) Sneezy
is still terrific, but Hiappy looks
like he has recently been lo-
botomized. (That's how it is
with dwarves.) Their singing
voices are excellent. In fact,
everyone sings quite nicely in
the film.
After a few stanzas of "Some-

day my Prince Will Come," or
"Whistle While You Work,"
your own childhood should
really be clobbering you over
the head.
In order to escape with your
childhood intact, don't see the
movies playing along with
Snow White. If you have a
weakness for dancing pigs, per-
haps you could see "The Three
Little Pigs."
But as for the other one, it
is only typical of the type, of
movie Walt Disney has made
since he died,

A look at ...
'The OddCouple".
by Daniel Okrent
THE WELCOME release provided by a visit to a theater to see
a light-hearted, generally meaningless, nothing-to-it comedy
is easy to appreciate. The mind doesn't bog down in parrying a
director's philosophical thrusts, nor do streams of depression in-
vade the viewer's state-of-being when a "tell it like it is" picture
is seen.
However, with most films of this species, the laughs can
only be carried so far. With a remarkable lack of felicity, the
situation comedy that starts from nowhere - ends nowhere.
And so it is with the Fox Village's The Odd Couple, an other-
wise very funny movie, gleaned from a very funny screenplay by.
Neil Simon, played, by two very funny actors (Walter Matthau
and Jack Lemmon), and supervised by a very funny new director,
Gene Saks.
But when it's all over, it's not all over: you sit there as
the credits prance across the screen, and wait for the plot,;
sensible up to that point, to resolve itself. Instead, the story
melts into the house lights.
The question: Who cares?
The Odd Couple was born on Broadway, with Matthau sharing
a divorcee apartment with Art Carney. The premise then and
now, for Simon's screenplay is an almost identical rerun of
his stage script, is the companionship of the two men that even-
tually turns into a pseudo-marriage, Matthau playing the role
of the doesn't-call-home, messes-up-the-kitchen, belching and
boozing husband, and Carney (now Lemmon) as the peripatetic
wife.
MATTHAU, AS EXPECTED, is brilliant; his floppy face and
unparalleled insult-swallowing frame a characterization that is
as distinctive - and, at times, as good - as Charlie Chaplin's
Tramp.
This man is The Slob. He even sweats with believability.
Jack Lemmon, on the other hand, suffers most from the
plot's final drowning. His generally high level portrayal crumbles
when he finally grows up and becomes a man, after nagging and
dusting and clearing his throat all the way to an almost con-
vincing male Mother. His new-found assertive masculinity comes
not by surprise, but entirely by accident, with no justification at all.
ON THE WAY to this finale, though, The Odd Couple scores
high. Yes, the comedy's closing is near tragedy.
The intermingled virtue of the two opposing qualities of
humor and disappointment is that there is no need to ask for
more. I suppose it is perfectly fine that a string of jokes does
not have to be tied up at the end to make each single laugh
"meaningful" or "worthwhile."
There is absolutely no reason whatsoever for asking so much
of a situation comedy, and maybe the best way to grade this type
of film is simply to count up the number and intensity of all
the laughs, and apply a raw number scoring system.
On this scale, The Odd Couple is a triumph. If you feel like
burying yourself in literary sense and form, however, go else-
where.
But I don't think you want to do that, do you?

The Association of Produc-
ing Artists' Repertory Com-
pany will be presented in Ann
Arbor for its seventh Fall Fes-
tival of three major productions
from Sept. 17 through Oct. 27.
The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program
will sponsor the fetival.
Robert C. Schnitzer, Profes-
sional Theatre Program execu-
tive director, said the opening
play of the APA season will
be Moliere's satire "The Mis-
anthrope" in a new version by
the celebrated American poet
Richard Wilbur, staged by
Stephen Porter.
The title role will be enacted
by Richard Easton, whose lead
portrayal of Berenger in "Exit
the King" was a highlight of
the 1967 season. Porter's creat-
tive direction of the APA hits
"Right You Are" and "The
Show-Off" resulted in memo-
rable Ann Arbor premieres in
past years.
A contemporary approach to
Shakespeare's "Hamlet," con-
ceived by APA artistic director
Ellis Rabb, will be the second
Fall Festival production.
The title role will be por-
trayed by Marco St. John, who
achieved a critical triumph in
Peter Ustinov's "The Unknown
Soldier and His Wife" at New
York's Lincoln Center last year.
Noted composer Conrad Susa
will create an original score
for the APA's new production
of the Shakespearean master-
work.
Sean O'Casey's richly comic
poetic fantasy "Cock-a-Doodle
Dandy" will climax the Fall
Festival, with Donald Moffat
in a key role. The play will
be the first by O'Casey in the
APA repertoire.
"Cock-a-Doodle Dandy" will
be staged by Jack O'Brien with
special music by Bob James-
the same pair who created the

words and music for the APA
production of "Pantagleize."
O'Brien was also codirector
of Sarte's "The Flies" for the
1966 Ann Arbor APA season.
Both are U-M graduates who
did notable work in campus
theater before distinguishing
themselves professionally.
The APA Fall Festival will
run for six weeks at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre on the
University of Michigan campus.
Each play will be presented
for two weeks.
Most of the productions cre-
ated in the: past six seasons
by APA for the U-M Profes-
sional Theatre Program have
proceeded successfully to the
Lyceum Theatre on Broadway
under the banner of New York's
Phoenix Theatre.
'Uconcert
postponed
The Summer Concert Series
sponsored by the University Musi-
cal Society will not begin today
as originally scheduled.
Alicia de Larrocha, the Span-
ish pianist who was to appear,
has had to cancel all of her sum-
merkengagements because of a
broken hand.
Rudolph Firkusny, noted Czech
pianist, will be the replacement
on a later date, July 31. Tickets
held for the original date will
be honored for the Firkusny re-
cital, in Rackham Lecture Hall at
8:30 p.m.
The series of four pianists will
begin with Vladimir Ashkenazy
on July 10, followed by David
Bar-Illan on July 16 and Jorge
Bolet on July 22.
Tickets are still available for
all concerts at the office of the
University Musical Society in
Burton Tower, Ann Arbor.

WASHINGTON (A') --The PoorI
People's Campaign sought a fed-I
eral court injunction yesterday
to force the Agriculture depart-
ment to spend $227 million im-
mediately to feed hungry people.
The campaign also called upon.1
four major presidential candidates
to condemn Secretary of Agricul-
ture Orville L. Freeman's "in-
human" decision to return un-
spent surplus commodities money'
to the Treasury Department be-
fore the fiscal year ends Sunday.
Acting in they place of the Rev.1
Ralph D. Abernathy, who is pre-
sently serving a 20-day jail term
for leading an illegal Capitol Hill
demonstration this weke, is te
Rev. Andrew Young, executive
secretary of the Southern Chris-
tians Leadership Conference.
Young told a, news conference
Freeman has discretionary auth-
ority to spend the $227 million.
Freeman has maintained her
lacks congressional authority to1
use the money except in emer-
gencies.
The Poor People's Campaign has
argued an emergency exists be-
cause millions of Americans are
undernourished.
Young challenged Vice Presi-
dent Hubert H. Humphrey, for-
mer Vice President Richard Nix-
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES E8
FO.MVILLGE
375No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300

on, Sen. Eugene McCarthy and
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller "to take
a stand condemning the return of
that $227 million to the treasury."
The campaign contends over
600 U.S. counties lack food pro-
grams for the poor, and that the
Agriculture Department is not
moving to correct the situation.
Young said demonstrations will
continue there. "But," he added,
"much of the problem is in Con-
gress and so we will ┬░continue
demonstrating at the Capital,
too."
The 36-year-old minister crit-
ized the House Agriculture Com-
mittee for killing a bill to ex-
pand the food-stamp program,
which' helps the poor buy food
at low prices.
He said demonstrators will
picket the Wphington offices and
homes of the 26 committee mem-
bers who voted against the meas-
ure, and also will. demonstrate in
their congressional districts.
Second class postage paid at Ann
Arbor. Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 48104.
Daily except Monday during regular
academic school year.
Fa4l and winter subserption rat
$4.50 per termi by carrier ($5 by mail)
$8.00 for regular academic school year
($9 by mail).

AND
@WaIt Disney
T5 0'IoO@ Productions
AND...
"3 LITTLE PIGS"-
FRIDAY
"The Thomas Crown Affair"

i

NOW SHOWING

I.

Lemmao
and
Walter
Matthau
are
The
Couple

FEATURE
TIMES
1:00
3:00
5.00
7:15
9:30
SAT. First
Show at
3:15

Tie Mirisch Corporation
Presents
McQueen
Faye
Duinaway
I n A
Nrman
Jewison
Film

AF

New: Vi Forum Theatre
"New Cinema Comes to Ann Arbor"

*A.
* ROGRAM
OF
UNDERGROUND
FILMS

^' ;
1

UNDERGROUND
COMEDY--CLASSICS
NEWSREEL
CALL 761 -9701

::

i

m.say
no more.

NEW PROGRAM WEEKLY
FRI. and SAT. EVENINGS 11 P.M. and 1 A.M.
SAT. AFTERNOON 3 and 5 P.M.

Opening Week-Every Performance
A SPECTACULAR Light Show

~O4IMASS
STA~e~,g

co-starring
Paul Burke
JackWeston
COLOR United Artists
by DeLuxe5
"';""s uggesteFor atur Audiences
FRIDAY
of the MICHIGAN

W

m

I e rI=CM

I

G

-i11 'tM/* .1 U '~i

r..

TO DAY !
CONTINUOUS
from 1 :30 p.m.

..I
IlinNIF

4 SHOWS
DAILY!

THE GREN 1BERETS
Green when they began...like the color of
their berets...but when the going got rough...they
became the toughest fighting force on earth!

STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED FOR THE
FIRST HALF OF THE SUMMER
You are definitely in luck-because of the unrelenting demand to see "Bedazzled,"
it has been held over repeatedly-again and again-and you now have the unex-
pected opportunity of seeing this fantastic film-if you act fast!!!
6th and FINAL SMASH WEEK.as
"Ann Arbor's Favorite Movie

I

I

I

"be' z:.w!cd"

"bedazzled"

"bedazzled"

IS "BEDAZZLED" REALLY,
HABIT FORMING?
Is it the outrageous, irrevent comedy of Peter Cook and
Dudley Moore, or Stanley Douen's devilish direction that

keeps people coming to see it again and again?
Or is it Raquel Welch as Lust that's keeping the
office busy with repeaters?

box-

'dOIIg3 Ij I AMID
WAYNE JANSSEN
WI",

"BEDAZZLED"

Mon. thru Sat--7-9:05; Sun.-3-5-7-9:05
, am

20th Century-Fox presents
edazzled"

AI

I

I IDO lATJW 044' 1

I

I

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