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June 26, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-06-26

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w

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

records
Satie: Meditated pranks

By R. A. PERRY
In seeking the roots of modern
artists such as Cage, Dine, Kien-'
holz, Kaprow, and Stockhausen,
our culture historians have un-
earthed the fascinating works of
such forward-looking composers
as Satie and Charles Ives. The re-
cent popularity of the music of
Erik Satie proves that the age of
Dada and Surrealism still haunts
us.
The fascination with Ives lies
for the most part in the curious
amalgam of old and new, tonality:
and atonal experimentation. Sa-
tie, on the other hand, offers his-f
torical interest in that he may
have been the first true neoclas-
sicist and the first surrealist of

music. yet his music so oddly-
and that is his magic-does not
sound dated, but rests either in
an eternal stillness or in a gaity
that is never merely topical. As
one historian, Roger Shattuck,
puts it Satie's "pranks seem to
originate from a serious, deeply
pondered behavior."
In our dizzily centrifugal times,
Satie may also appeal to us be-
cause he never espoused or set
himself to establish any musical
tradition. He disavowed (and sug-
gested Debussy do the same) not
merely Wagnerian influence, but
all academic formalism. "People
of a certain age," he said, "al-
ways talk about their 'experience.'
One ought to be sure they've real-

A look at..
'Here We Oo Round The MulberrydBush'
by Fred LaBour
Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush, currently running at
the Campus, concerns itself with the stage of Everyman's life when
he wants little more than to go to bed with some girl, any girl,
any place, any time.
All of Everyman's friends are seemingly caught up in and
frantically pursuing the fruits of the sexual revolution but he is
left on the sidelines, quite far away from all of the action. He
is prone to daydreaming the erotic, yet innocent, dreams of a
young man nurtured by a culture that features supersonic, well-
packaged, short-skirted sex.
Everyman, played by Jamie McGregor playedby Barry Evans,
is led by his sexual craving (not a madman's insane, perverted
craving you understand, but rather a young man's acceptable
craving) into half a dozen very, very amusing adventures. As
one seduction attempt after another fails, however, it becomes
evident that there is one girl that stands above the others in
his mind.
Mary (played by Judy Geeson, the girl in To Sir with Love
with the big lips) is the pivot point for the maturity of the film
as well as Jamie. If she had been painted into the princess-type,
shining-pure "Isn't the rest of the world crass?" role, the audience
would have left quickly and silently, passively throwing up in
the gutters along South University. But she was left believable,
and consequently the film comes off.I
Jamie and Mary go away for a weekend, she takes off her
clothes by a lake, ("Gasp," said the lady behind me) Janie takes
off his clothes, they make 'love, Jamie has stars in his eyes,
thinking "This one is different; I love her." But Mary is not
oriented towards any type of permanent relationship, and she
tells Jamie that maybe someday soon they can do it again, lit-
erally, but that in the meantime she has other friends, equally
important to her and who the hell are you anyway to tell me
what to do.
It is at this point that the film again comes close to founder-
ing. The inherent chaotic quality of the film seems to come to the
fore just before it ends, and the possibility pops up that it may
have been a stupid, however clever, movie. But the last scene
rescues it in an incredibly beautiful exuberant scene, with Jamie
looking at a girl and thinking about "the kind of girl I'd like to
marry.",
And so he has made it around the Mulberry Bush, and he has,
seen something of what is true about man-woman relationships,
and he is beginning to feel what it is to be a man.
Clive Donner's deft direction of the film fits the story su-
perbly. He paces the film just fast enough to hold interest, but
long enough to fully explore each scene. Donner elicits an excel-
lent performance by Evans and a host of amazingly good sup-
porting players. The only weak link is Miss Geeson, but then she
would be any film's weak link.
Jamie's daydream sequences are done very well. Kept down
to a manageable length, and the result is a valuable and tech-
nically fascinating contribution to the film.
Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush has solved a problem
that seems to be increasingly difficult for the film-makers of today:
how to film humor. On the one hand we get Bedazzled with its
painful rib poking "Get it?" style and on the other is the Yours,
Mine and Ours slapstick, wholesome, doubletake routine. Mulberry
Bush is, simply and clearly, amusing.

ly had any worthwhile expe-
riences." No doubt a lot of wise
hippies are buying the Satie al-
bums. And again, if the uncrafts-
manlike proclivities of our paint-
ers send us back for precedents,
we find Satie crying out, "Long
live the Amateurs. All great art-
ists are amateurs." He meant it,
just as Mortan Feldman meant
it when he said that now that
things are so easy, there is so
much to do.
If our era is a time which seeks
to eradicate the sense of history
and which shudders at the
thought of the events that must
occur in the next decades, the
music of Satie panders to our
stance. It does not, in Virgil
Thomson's words,,- "invoke the
history of music," nor does it, as
does the music of Schoenberg,
strike out for some newrealm;
Satie slows down, and at best,
transcends musical time.
The slow pieces of this Mont-
martre pianist, works such as Six
Gnossienes, the Pieces Froides, or
the most famed Trois Gymnope-
dies remind one of Marcel Mar-
ceau pantomiming walking. Go-
ing nowhere and seeking noth-
ing, the notes enclose space in
the most serene and airy fashion.
Here lies neoclassic coolness and
the utmost lyrical purity. "Do
you know how to clean sounds?"
Satie asked. "It is a rather dirty
process."
In contrast to these pristine
works are the ebullient musical
collages, full of premeditated
wrong notes and extramusical in-
fluences, whichproceed like a
ball bouncing down the steps of
Sacre Coeur. These piano pieces
contain much of the French color
and gaity of Satie's contem-
porary, Toulouse-Lautrec, but,
unlike the painter, they teach
nothing but the exhiliration of the
ride.
Little of Satie's small output,
has been recorded. Besides some
of the ballet music, the major!
contribution to Satie's disco-
graphy has been the recently ex-
panding piano series by Aldo Cic-
colini on the Angel label. Cic-
colini's newest recording, Angel
S-36485, includes the early and.
important Trois Sarabandes and
a large portion of the later works
of the 1910-15 period. As usual,
they are very well-played-idio-
matic, zestful, and meditative
where need be.
Games
arnie
pay's

New CORE head Roy Innis

Innis to head CORE
in McKissick, absence

NEW YORK OP)-Floyd B. Mc-
Kissick, national director of the
Congress of Racial Equality,
(CORE) is taking a leave of ab-
sence for medical reasons and
his post will be temporarily held

th
3:
le
a
hi

He said that at a meeting of
he council in Cleveland on May
1, McKissick submitted a formal
etter of resignation which was
xcepted, but the council asked
im to stay on at least through
he convention and for a transi-
onal period until a new national
irector had been elected.

Warren sends letter Sun
to LBJ on retirement
SAN FRANCISCO (k) - Chief has served as chief justice since C
Justice Earl Warren said yester- 1953. ,330
day he had sent a letter to Pres- Gov. Ronald Reagan, a fellow
ident Johnson about his retire- California Republican, has voiced
ment plans. criticism of Warren's resignation
However, he said, "as a matter so as to permit a Johnson ap-
of courtesy:.. the contents should pointment.I dr
come from him (Johnson)." Yesterday Warren refused to wr
"Thmake any discuss Reagan or any other po- Er
"Te President should maeaylitical issues by
announcement about the letter, i . bP
whenever it may be," Warren told During his stay in California, M
an airport news conference on his Warren said he planned to see r
arrival from Washington. as many of my children as pos- Ph
There has been speculation since sible." He planned to attend a A A
the end of last week that Warren reunion with seven of the eight
had submitted his resignation and ing graduates of his old Kern Ov
would step down in time for John- County high school class at a
son to name his successor. Bakersfield r
Asked about a possible succes-
sor, Warren smiled and said:
"We're not going to get into poli- M I ,S E R(
tics, gentlemen."
He indicated that he would be FAMILY RESTAURANT C
doing some house hunting while TRASUE CRI! M
in California, though he did not # CHICKGERS " bet
specify a particular city. * CONEY ISLANDS b
" JUMBOYS re
However, when asked when he SMILING of
would be returning, Warren said SPEEDYSRVICE laI
"it may be.soon." CARRYOUT SPECIALISTS
NO WAITING - PLENTY
Warren, who was accompanied of PARKING e
by his wife, told newsmen his INSIDE SEATING ORf
years on the court "have been the OPEN 11 A R DALY
most satisfying I can imagine."
Speaking of his long-range 662-0022e -
plans, Warren said "unquestion- 3325 WASHTENAW RD.
ably, when I retire, I'll spend a ANN ARBOR J
great deal of my time in Cali- 2 BLKS. W. of ARBORLAND JOJi
fornia."
Asked about the significance of
his retirement, Warren replied, Aix' REre T s
"age - my age." Warren is 77 and FOH VILL6E N
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300
JMMER
IVE IN A Jack
Lemm
.o and
Board Only Mattfi
$13.00are
per week
The
hours work,
wn and run
housesCo
MEN
Michigan, 315 N. State -.say
Nakamura, 807 S. State no mor,
Owen, 1017 Oakland
Pickerill, 923 S. Forest
. University
e or contact
ATIVE COUNCILIctwA
668-68721ft "

by Roy Innis, CORE announced to
yesterday. ti
There have been reports of in-
ternal difficulties in CORE, buts-
Wilfred T.mUssery, CORE na-
tional chairman who made the
announcement, said reports that
Innis would replace McKissick
after the national convention in
Columbus, Ohio, next week wereE
"presumptuous."
Ussery said CORE's national
actio scoucil, the decision-making
body, has taken no action on the
directorship.
Innis, 34, now associate na-
tional director, is a militant
black natianalist like MeKissick
but considered less vehement in!
his opposition to cooperation be-
tween blacks and whites in the
civil rights movement.
Ussery said that McKissick
submitted his resignation to the
National Action Council in Balti-
more several weeks ago for per-
sonal reasons, but that no actl~pn
was taken, on the resignation.

THIS SI
EAT OR L

CO.

Room and
Board
$20.00
per week

plus a few
since we ov
our own

/ednesday, June 26, 1968
day Night Film Series
1S SUNDAY JUNE 30
9 P.M.
ANTERBURY HOUSE
Maynard--in the alley
H1E-SPANI1SH >*
EARTH
r Joris Ivens, narration
itten and spoken by
nest Hemingway. Script
Lillian Hellman, John Dos
issos, Archibald MacLeish,
usic by Virgil Thompson'
d Mark Blitzstein,
iotography by John Ferno.
film of the civil war in
an; collaboration of the
itstanding documentarist
ens with Hemingway
id there American
riters in 1937.
THE -SIN OF JESUS
Robert Frank
amera: Gert Berliner
usic: Morton Feldman
:rank explores the tension
tween various levels of
ality, and our perception
them." (Elizabeth Suther-
nd, Film Quarterly)
ach film is around 45 min.
Frank at 10:15 following
intermission
5c-coffee and rolls at cost
The Daily Staff
4W SHOWING
FEATURE
o ~TIMES
1 05
3:3i5
5:30
7:45
10:00
fl t SAT. First
Show at
3:15
di
ale
THE

Bedazzled,"
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izzled"
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STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED FOR -
FIRST HALF OF THE SUMMER
You are definitely in luck-because of the unrelenting demand to see "I
it has been held over repeatedly-again and again-and you now have
pected opportunity of seeing this fantastic film-if you act fast!!!
6th and FINAL SMASH WEEK as
Ann Arbor's Favorite Movie

ROBIN MOORE'S BLOCKBUSTER
BEST-SELLER IS ON THE SCREEN.
TME

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IS "'BEDAZZLED" REALLY
HABIT FORMING?
Is it the outrageous, irrevent comedy of Peter Cook
Dudley Moore, or Stanley Douen's devilish direction
keeps people coming to see it again and again?

da
y-Fox
t I

and
that

Or is it Raquel Welch as Lust that's keeping the box-
office bysy with repeaters?
"BEDAZZLED"
Mon. thru Sat.-7-9:05; Sun.-3-5-7-9:05

20th Centur
"'bedaz

IM AlIF

- Slarww winw WUW ~ LU ~ - 2 -, 'L~i1 ~ I rr~Iirh1 $L' I IIWnPR(ROLJWD MOVIES

I UNDERGROUND MOVIES

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