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June 26, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-06-26

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Wednesday, June 26, 196b

TnE M1CH GAN DAILY

WenedaJue 6,196 TE IriANDAL

Gov. Rockefeller
,to name senator
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP)-Gov. Nelson were considered sure for the gov-
A. Rockefeller flew here yester- ernor.
day to confer with state Repub- The governor was on home
lican leaders on a Senate successor ground here in Albany and re-
for the murdered Robert '. Ken- ceived a roaring welcome fron
nedy and to receive the formal en- about 3,000 supporters as he con-
46orsement of New York's delega- tinued his campaign for'the presi
tion presidential nominating con- dency.
vention. Flying to Albany, the governor
Of the 92 members, all but four said "there was absolutely no
hnasis" to retorts that he had

I

r-
to
ni

House OK's
flag measure
WASHINGTON (R) - Congress
completed action yesterday on a
bill to make burning or other!
deliberate mutilation of the Amer-
ican flag a federal offense.
The House, by voice vote, ac-
cepted Senate amendments to a
bill it originally passed last June,
sending the measure to the White
House.
# Actually, the Senate amend-
ments restored to, the bill a pro-
vision- applying its terms only to
persons who knowingly desecrate
the flag and returned the word
"burning" to the forms of dese-1
cration the bill would penalize,

gven up ideas of running with
alifornia Governor Ronald Rea-
gan.
"He is an outstanding governor,"
he told reporters traveling with
him. "Although Mr. Reagan him-
self has said he would not be a
candidate, there have been ,a
great many people who have felt
that there was a possibility of a
ticket here."
Rockefeller says he has not
made up his mind whom to ap-
point to fill Kennedy's term, which
runs to 1970.
Among those most prominently
mentioned for the post are Mayor
John V. Lindsay of New York
City, Whitney Young, Negro head
of the Urban League and John
W. Gardner, recently resigned as
secretary of Health, Education4
and Welfare.
Rockefeller has been reported
under pressure to appoint a Negro.

i
F'
t

-Associated Press
rflLI(eall an d camiipaign chairman Jo ohn Nichol greet supporters'

.

P rnrlrt Tn ,in,, l. o lnttia '11111

NATO1
travel I
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (P)-The -
15 North Atlantic allies told the
Russians and East Germans last
night they stand ready to keep
open Berlin's lifelines to the West.
In a communique winding up
their two-day spring session; they
condemned new Communist curbs
on traffic to the divided city as
"a deliberate attempt to jeopardize
detente"-meaning East-West ac-
coinmodation.
With France standing aloof,
the allies nevertheless offered the
Communist part of Europe a
chance to join in a program of
balanced force cuts in the Eastern
and Western parts of the con-
tinent.
To reinforce their negotiating
position in case that offer is pick-
ed up, the ministers ruled out
any one-sided troop or armament
withdrawals from the allied part
of Europe unless the Communists
do the same. This Move will en-
able President Johnson's admin-
istration to argue more effectively
against congressional pressure
groups wanting a cut-back of
America's more than 200,000-
strong garrisons in Europe.
In another significant develop-
ment, the ministers alerted their
staffs to prepare for action coun-
tering the buildup of Soviet naval
power in the Mediterranean.
On Berlin, the NATO Council
chose with care their warning to
the East:
-They squarely pinned onto
Russian responsibility for any-
thing imperilling Berlin's right to
preserve land, water and air links
with the West.
-They reaffirmed terms of a
10-year-old pledge binding each
to join in defending "the security
and welfare" of the former Ger-
man capital.
)NGERI.

pledges to halli
ians on Berlin

MW

J I I Ut*LA/ ..GE ..G I / 1 /U(,EA/ 'U'EGUjJE'/ ( G'/IG/
TORONTO {P - Canadians reviewing stand at a Montreal as head of the government April
voted yesterday in their sixth na- parade by the St. Jean Baptiste 20. trudeau called the election
tional election in 11 years. with Society. three days later in the hope of
newspapers across the country Before the streets were cleared achieving a majority in Parlia-
predicting that Prime Minister 135 persons had been hospitalized ment, an objective never reached
Pierre Elliott Trudeau's Liberal and 290 arrested. The disorders by Pearson during five years in
paty would win a majority in began as anti-Trudeau demon- office.
Parliament dstration by Quebec separatists and' While the 1968 election shaped
Early voting indicated a heavy turned into a wild clash in which up largely as a choice between
turnout despite rain in some sec- bottles and other missiles were Stanfield's staid Maritime con-
tions. hurled. servatism and Trudeau's tncon-
What had been a hard-fought The campaign was largely a ventional intellectualism, there.
but quiet political campaign personality contest between Con- were two issues which may have
wound up in a bloody melee Mon- servative party leader Robert left their impact.
day night when. the 48-year-old Stanfield and the prime minister, One was the question of Que-
prime minister appeared on the who succeeded Lester B. Pearson bec and the other the country's
---economic difficulties. Stanfield
hit hard throughout the campaign
at what he called Liberal failure
to halt inflation and deal with

J -Associated Press
A GROUP OF CUB SCOUTS exercise their own form, of gun
control by breaking up the toy -gun stock of Chicago wholesaler
David Perlin. The boys were asked by Perlin to smash the in-
ventory of nearly 1,000 toy guns. Perlin says he will no longer
sell toy firearms.
Senatemay prove

Subscribe Now to
SUMMER.FESTIVAL
'68
with
University Players I.
4. GREAT PLAYS
OPENING TONIGHT'
with'
4. 4
|| , ' 4't

June 30, 8-11 P.Me.
Welcome to new students
Leave taking to Dr. Jacobs

unemployment. Trudeau laid
stress on the Quebec issues.

r
ii

LIVE LC

strong gun
WASHINGTON (A) -President-
Johnson's second shot at more
stringent gun legislation 'appears,
headed for approval by the Senato
Judiciary Committee, but the
House is cool to the administration
bid.
PresideAtial assistant Joseph A.
Califano Jr., reported yesterday
White House mail is running about
4 to 1 in favor of more effective
gun laws, although there has re-
cently been an increase in letters
against Johnson's stand.
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana said mail
from his home state protests
stricter gun laws and is over-
whelmingly opposed to federal gun
curbs.
The President has requested a
law requiring the registration of
all firearms and licensing of gun
owners if states fail to enact laws
meeting federal licensing stand-
ards.

conrol bil
He signed a gun control bill
passed by Congress a few days
ago, but this was aimed at curbing
sales only of handguns. The new
bill would apply to all weapons.
Senate Republican Leader Ev-
erett M. Dirksen said a bill in-
cluding elements df various pend-
ing proposals to tighten firearms
law will likely be approved Thurs-
day by the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee.
Dirksen, the .committee's rank-
ing Republican, said he expects
the levislation to be a compound
of three bills. These include the
original administration bill ban-
ning mail order sales of rifles and
shotguns, and bills from the ad-
ministration and from Sen. Joseph
D. Tydings (D-Md) requiring reg-
istration and licensing.
Dirksen said he hasn't yet de-
cided which bill' to support; but
added: I am going to support
something that has teeth in it."

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by Art Ba rtne r

I

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appointment.

1429 H ILL

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