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June 15, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-15

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i

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 15, 1968

P.e.woTE,.CIANDAL

a , i i
i }r~,

Hundreds turn in pistols, rifles
after Kennedy's assassination

Defense budget cuts may delay
antimissile system installation

_ _. ... ... _ .. .. . , . ., j_1 ... ,. ._..

NEW YORK (A')-In a symbolic
gesture, hundreds of people are
turning in pistols, rifles and shot-
guns to police in cities across the
country.
The gun owners were moved to
action by the assassination of
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy.
More than 170 turned .firearms
over to police in San Francisco,
100 in Chicago, 14 in Philadelphia,
19 in New York City and 11 in
Buffalo-including a machine gun.
Last weekend Alan Schoening
walked into the police station in
Lancaster,- Pa., and handed over
a .22-caliber rifle and-.a 16-gauge
shotgun. "I want to give you these
guns so that you can destroy,
New relations
director named
Jack H. Hamilton, assistant to
Vice President Michael Radock,
has been named assistant director
of University Relations. The ap-
pointment is effective July 1.
In his new position, Hamilton
will aid the directors of the Uni-
versity Public Relations units.
Hamilton was director of new
and commentary for statiol'i
WDTM-FM and senior news edi-
tor for WJR in Detroit before
coming to the University.
A 1949 graduate of Northwest-
ern University's Medill School of
Journalism, Hamilton is complet-
ing work for a master's degree in
political science. Hamilton is a
member of the Civil Liberties
Board of the Faculty Assembly
and served on the University
Steering Committee for the De-
velopment of Academic Oppor-
tunities.

them," said Schoening, a hunter
for 2 years. "I don't feel like kill-
ing anything any more.'
The acts are a gesture of con-
science and concern, but from a
practical standpoint they don't
put a noticeable dent in the num-
ber of firearms owned by Amer-
icans.
A spokesman for the gun in-
dustry estimates there are 100
million guns in the United States,
enough to arm half the popula-
tion.
Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, (D-
Md), has proposed legislation to
require registration and licensing
of all firearms.
Calling it the most comprehen-
sive and far-reaching federal gun
control legislation ever proposed,
Tydings said he felt a gun control'
bill submitted to Congress by
President Johnson was inade-
quate.
Postmaster General W. Marvin
Watson announced regulations
Wednesday to hold up delivery of
any firearms sent through the
mails without prior notification to
local law enforcement officers.
He said all firearms sent through
the mails would have to be clear-
ly labeled as such from now on.
Mayor Joseph Aloto of San
Francisco called on gun owners a
week ago to turn in their fire-
arms. So far 170 guns have been,
received. One was a World War II
rocket launcher and another a
120-year-old revolver valued as a
'collector's item at about $30.
In Sacramento, an assembly
committee Thursday rejected a
proposed gun control law calling
for a state check on the sale or
gift of all firearms in California.
Gov. Ronald Reagan said he
thought gun control may be an

"over-simplification" to solving
the problems of violence.
About two dozen guns have been
turned in so far in Honolulu,
where police said "no questions
asked." The wives of several serv-
icemen said they would hand over
guns their husbands left them for
protection. One Navy wife, Mrs.
Harry Galten, has organized a
"Give Back Your Gun Club."
June is gun amnesty month in
New York State under the new,
penal code. Nineteen have turned
in guns in New York City, 20 in
Rochester and 11 in Buffalo.,
But in Buffalo the police also
report they are swamped with ap-
plications for pistol permits. Police
have issued 915 licenses so far this
year, compared with about 1,500
in 1967.
In Detroit the panic buying of
guns has pushed the cost of a po-
lice revolver up $20 or more over
the former price of $60 to $80,
according to Glenford Leonard,
public, safety director at Oak Park
and president of the Michigan
Association of Chiefs of Police.
James Murray of Sharon, Mass.,
said he tried to leave his dis-
mantled 12-gauge on the lawn of
the Hyannis police station, at the
rectory of St. Francis Catholic
church and at the Hyannis VFW
post, but was refused. St. Francis
is the church where the Kennedys
worship when in Hyannis.
A police spokesman said they
would have been glad to take the
gun, "but leaving it on the lawn
is another thing."
In St. Louis, J. A. Baer II, pres-
ident of Stix, Baer and Fuller
Stores, said the chain would dis-
continue selling firearms and hand
over about $25,000 in guns and
ammunition to state, city and
county police.

WASHINGTON (AP)-Pentagon
officials believe the defense budget
will have to absorb possibly $31
billion of the $6 billion in spend-
::.::::.;.:ing cuts demanded by Congress in1
return for voting the Johnson ad-
ministration a tax increase,. j
As a result, installation of an
antimissile system designed to
defend the United States against
a possible Communist Chinese
nuclear attack by the mid-1970s
may be stretched out.
China is believed to be at least1
:.Schreiber to
<retire July1
a p;Nicholas Schreiber, principal of
Ann Arbor High School for 22
years, announced yesterday he will
retire July 1, a year earlier than
planned.
Schreiber has been deeply in-
volved in the recent controversy
,,p over charges by AAHS black stu-l
dents of discrimination in the
,. "school's academic, athletic and
extracurricular activities.
Schreiber came under criticism
when he imposed what some stu-
dents called "partial martial law"
on the school after racial viqlence
forced the closing of AAHS for
A F" several days.
4 .:> Assistant Principal Theodore
-Associated Press Rokicki is being mentioned as a
- I 1' -ipossible successor.
litya , kids, i ya, i Ya In a letter dated May 19 which
There is more than an emotional change when pet and master was released yesterday Schreiber
have lived together for a long time, As Camus noted in "The had expressed this desire to retire
Stranger" after a long while old Salamano and his dog began early.
to look very much alike. This phenomena also seems to occur

six months late in its first test-
firing of a long-range ballistic
missile, and this could be used as
a justification for a delay in de-
ploying a U.S. missile .defense.
Other major defense programs
unrelated directly to the Vietnam
war also. are considered vulner-
able.
These include Navy plans to
build costly, modern fleet escorts,
new amphibious assault ships and
fast-deployment supply vessels.
The Army may have trouble
holding on to its partially organ-
ized 6th Infantry Division.
The Air Force may see its al-
ready-delayed Manned Orbiting
Laboratory, the biggest military
space project, slip even fuirther.
"There are going to have to be
some arbitrary cuts," one official
said. '
This may well intensify inter-
service feuding which has been
at a minimum in recent years.

"It's easy for the services to
get along when there is plenty of
money to go around," a civilian
official said. "But when money
get tight, the competition for
funds can get pretty hot."
Defense officials said they have
not yet. been told by the Budget
Bureau where to slice proposed
spending.
Much will depend on actions
taken by Congress. The. House and
Senate may direct significant pro-
gram cuts and leave little for the
Defense Department to decide on
its own.
Sen. John Sherman Cooper (R-
Ky.) and Sen. Phillip A. Hart (D-
Mich.) already have asked a, de-
lay on deploying the Sentinel
Antimissile System.
That system is calculated to
cost at least $5 billion but Penta-
gon budget authorities have esti-
mated actual spending this fiscal
year would be about $200 million.

in little children.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Miqbigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsbility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L, S. & A. Bldg., be-
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Studentx organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
Day Calendar
Pakistap Student Association of
America Annual Convention - First
Session, South Quadrangle, 9:30 a.m.
Cinema Guild - Paul Muni, Bette
Davis, Brian Aherne in "Juarez", Ar-
chitecture Aud., 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
SUNDAY, JUNE 16
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "The Management of Managers
ORGANIZATION
NTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in room 1011 SAB.
* , . *
Inter-Varsity: Michigan Christian
Fellowship. June 17, 1968, 7:30 p.m., at
University Church of the Nazarene,
409 S. Division, Gospel Concert by
the Chinese Christian Chorale.
Graduate Outing Club-Hiking, swim-
ming, camping, etc. Meets every Sun-
day at 2:00 p.n1, at Huron Street en-
trance to Rackham Bldg.
University Lutheran Chapel, June 16,
1968, 9:45 a.m., 1511. Washtenaw, Ser-
mon: "The Search for Security," by
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Holy Commu-
nion.
After
"A MAN AND A WOMAN"
the new
love story by
Claude Lelouch

No. 61, North Campus Commons, 8:15
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Pakistan Students Association of
America Annual Convention - First
Session, South Quadrangle, 8:30 ra.m.
Annual Meeting of the American So-
riety of Ichthyologists and Herpetolo-
gists-Registration, Sheraton Inn, 1:00
p.m.
MONDAY, JUN E 17
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"The Management of Managers
No. 62": North Campus Commons, 8:15
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Annual Meeting of the American So-
ciety of ichthyologists and Herpetolo-
gists - Registration, Lobby, Rackham
Building, 8:00 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business - "Training Systems Work-
shop": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m, to
5:00 p.m.
General Notices
TV Center Prdgrams: On Sun., June
16 the following programs produced by
the TV Center will have their initial
telecast in Detroit:
11:00 a.m., WJBK-TV, Channel 2 -
Christian Barnard. A color film of Dr.
Barnard's news conference on campus,
with comments by Dr. Donald Kahn,
U-M thoracic surgeon.
12:00 Noon, WWJ-TV, Channel 4 -
After Eden: "The Garden Splendid."
The great economic and cultural ex-
plosion in the state of Islam during
the 9th and 10th centuries A.D. is sur-
veyed,
Senate Assembly Meeting - Mon.,
June 17, at 3:15 p.m., 310 Undergradu-
ate Library.

TO STUDENTS WHO EXPECT TO GENERAL DiVISION tors, indust. psych or clinical psych.
EARN GRADUATE DEGREES AT THE Current Position Openings Received age range 30-40, broad bckrnd.
END OF THE SUMMER TERM: by General Division by mail mnd phone Bendix Corporation, Detroit, Mich.-
Graduates may elect to receive the -please call 764-7460 for further infor- Accountant at corporate hdqters, not
large diploma (si e 13x17") without mation: gnrl. acctg. Learn team consolidation,
additional cost provided written ap- Clark Equipment Company, Battle respon for 57 divisions, man, 2 yrs.
plication is made to the Diploma De- Creek, Mich.-Propect Engineer, BSEE. exper and courses, BA degree, prefer,
partment no later than sixty days Project Engineer BSME. Proj Engr., exper. .
before the closing date of the term in BSEE. Sales Trainee, Mk g. degree Bus. Opportunities for Further Study and
which the degree is to be earned. Ad. Management Trainee, bus. ad. or Financial Aid call 764-7460 for further
ME. BSEE Prlj. Engr. Engr. req. exper. info:
University of Pittsburgh Graduale
! E am rot W 1.<t Podut ange, Cm-Do to alOhio 1Mcdiieai Products, AIRCO, Mad-k School of Public Health, Dept. of Blo-
ra ExaAs.t." P " Manager, Coinstatistics, has grant to sponsor MS de-i
Doctoral Examination for: Charles tnerc, 1s. Ad degree. Methods Plan- gree in Public Health Statistics, fel-i
Daniel Dillman, Geography, Disserta- ningengrTI SME or IE and 1-3 yrs. Ilowships available, plus tuition, fees,
ion:i "The Functions of BrownsvilleOther po-itions for persons with less and dependent allowance. Bach. level
Texas and Mattmoros, Tamaulipas: Twint"rcup"e pc400 degrees in meth., soc., anthro.,econ.,
Cities of the Lower Rio Grande," on General Re.'eaarch Corporation, Santa educ., bus ad., poli. sci, psych., engrg.,j
Monday, June 17 at 10 a.m, in Room Barbara, Calif.-So i - Psychologit, ex- biol., nursir., or med. are likely back-
4508 Administration Building, Chair- per O% survey work and problems of grounds. Application should be made
man: R. N. Pearson. social chang, not work in human fac- before Aug. 1.j

TONIGHT!
BRIAN AHERNE
CLAUDE RAINS
"I WAS A
MIIIFUGITIVE
FROM A MUNI
CHAIN
GANG"
BETTE DAVIS
SET MEXICO FREE
in
JUAREZ
7:00 & 9:05
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
75c CHEAP

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Monday Noon Luncheon
BUFFET 25c
"Economics, Politics and Technolo9y"
PROF. BRANKO HORVATH, University of Belgrade
SUNDAY NIGHT FILM SERIES
Sun., June 16, 9 P.M., Canterbury House
"A WEAPON CALLED MEMORY"
program of tape and film-an attempt to bring an eady film, whose
social meaning was distorted and forgotten, to bear on the present:
THE CABINEt OF
DR. CALIGARI
silent film (1919), introduced by
THE PRAGMATIC WARRIORS ,
tape montage by Jeremy Lustig, re-edited by Randall Jacob
(tape is 1st part of program, film 2nd part..
About CALIGARI: the original story by Hans Janowit; and Carl Mayer
was drastically altered in meaning by the inclusion of a "framing
story" by director Robert Wiene and the studio (Kracauer, FROM
CALIGARI TO HITLER). While showing Wiene's altered story intact
after the opening "framing" scene, we will try to provide the film
with a context which suggests the authors' original intentions.
CALIGARI was one of the 12 "best films of all time" selected by
international critics in 1958.
Sponsored by VOICE-SDS
75c-coffee and rolls at cost

Placemen
kUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
3 P.M., Multipurpose Room
Undergraduate Library
METROPOLIS
Fritz Lang-Theau von Horbou
41927)
film vision of class conflict
in the future city,
distorted by "ornamental"
style and misunderstanding
of ideas.
Sponsored by Voice Film Series
Free-donation requested

TONIGHT at
Bob Franke
singing original, traditional, and
contemporary folk music 1421 Hill St.
playing banjo, guitar, and harmonica. 8:30 P.M.

HELD OVER BY POPULAR DEMAND

I

$1.00 cover includes free food

NOWHI -.

Program
Information
NO 2-6264

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor

EXCLUSIVE SHOWING
WED.-SAT.-SUN.
1:10-3:50-6:30-9:10
OTHER DAYS
7:00 and 9:18

'V

js ie cnd ws-
HRS ~UNTER'S as MILLIE
Wo~c~u o
'' AUNIVERSAL PICTURE." TECHNICOLORa4e

TODAY at 1:20-3:20-5:25-7:25-9:30

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Coming
NEXT

TOMMY STEELE in
"HALF A SIXPENCE"

Carefree
Parking

inside
Comfort

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We Make Our
Own Weather

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H ELD NATIONALr4NEALCORPTION
OVER FOR VILLAGE
3RD WEEK 375No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300

FEATURE TIMES
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7:00-9:25

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Shows at 1 -3-5-7-9

yVEs MONTANd
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ANNIE qIRARdOT
IVE
LEAD

NOTICE!!! CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS
EVERY DAY FOR THE SUMMER
".PLANET OF THE APES' IS A
BLOCKBUSTER.FASCINATING I"
-Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan
20TH CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
(IJARITAN I4RTIN

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