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June 15, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-06-15

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Saturday, June l5, 196S
Pick Abel to succeed'
Reuther as IUD head

THE MICHIGAN DAIL)

"I

Page Three

WASHINGTON (I)-I. W. Abel,
head of the United Steelworkers,
will be named to succeed Walter
Reuther as president of the AFL-
CIO's largest division, the Indus-
trial Union Department, informed
sources said yesterday.
Reuther lost the post when his
United Auto Workers union. was
suspended from the AFL-CIO a
month ago for refusing to pay
dues. The suspension followed a
two-year quarrel between Reuther
and AFL-CIO President George
Meany over leadership of the labor
federation.
Abel reportedly was chosen with-
out opposition at a meeting of
Industrial Union Department of-

ficials
elected
ecutive

and was expected to be
by the department's ex-
board later yesterday.

The department embraces 52 of
the federation's 128 unions and
nearly half its total membership of
13.6 million workers.
UndernReuther, the department
'had been active in helping union
organizing drives and in the re-
cent development of coordinated
bargaining, in which groups of
unions have handed together for
more strength in negotiating with
large corporations.
Reuther's union was suspended
fromtheAFL-CIO underan auto-
matic provision of the federation's
constitution after withholding
dues for three months.
The Steelworkers, with more
than one million members, became
the largest union in the AFL-CIO
after the suspension of the 1.6
million-member Auto Workers
union.
The suspension of the Auto
Workers followed Reuther's long
attack on Meany and other AFL-
CIO leaders, whom Reuther ac-
cused of failing to meet the chal-
lenge of the labor movement's
modern needs.
Reuther has sharply criticized
AFL-CIO policies on organizing,
bargaining, social programs, for-
eign affairs and virtually all other
matters.
The Auto Workers \for more
than a year before the split with
the AFL-CIO had halted their
heavy financial contributions to
the Industrial Union Department,
while heavy spending continued
for organizing drives and other
labor programs run by the depart-
ment.

Guarding the candidate
With security tightened for political figures since the death of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, Secret
Service men pave the way for Sen. Eugene McCarthy (D-Minn) as he arrives at New York's
Americana Hotel to address a luncheon.
PEACE SEEMS DISTANT:
Delegate's ponder talks

Bonn to c
on Berlin
Ambassador
called home
BONN, Germany (4) - West
Germany called home its ambas-
sador to Moscow yesterday and
planned talks with the heads of
the allied governments on how to
pressure the Soviet Union into
stopping East Germany's red-tape
slowdown of overland traffic to
West Berlin.
The lever might be a threat by
Bonn that it would not sign the
treaty to check the spread of nu-
clear weapons drafted jointly by
the United States and Russia.
The moves coincided with an
inflammatory editorial in the of-
ficial East German Communist
party newspaper, Neues Deutsch-
land, warning that "there will be
new unpleasant" surprises for
West Germany as long as it re-
fuses to recognize the East Berlin
regime.
Chancellor Kurt Georg Kiesin-
ger summoned Ambassador Hel-
mut Allardt for discussions Mon-
day that could deal with trading
West Germany's signature on the
test ban treaty for withdrawal of
the new East German travel re- Cowboy
strictions. "forever
Rainer Barzel, parliamentary ticularly
floor leader of Kiesinger's Chris- "the ins
tian Democratic party, said Kie- actors w
singer would get in touch by tele-
phone or letter with President, ^
Johnson, Prime MinisterHarold GOP
Wilson and President Charles de
Gaulle-the leaders of the three
countries that have responsibility
for West Berlin's security. G
Barzel said the party's leader-
ship had discussed combining the
nuclear issue with that of access to
to West Berlin, hinting that the
United States should exercise its
influence on the Soviet Union and
its East German ally. Republica
Border control points at Berlin here unit
and Helmstedt on the 110-mile GOP
autobahn that links West Berlin "I doi
and West Germany through East Claude Ki
German territory reported normal as a poten
traffic yesterday after chaotic de- Gov.
lays Thursday. not the ti
That was the first day on which port in hi,
the East Germans collected new Hoe
visa fees and travel charges. TheyHowe
also have demanded that West powerfulI
Germans obtain passports by July delegation
15 in order to use the highway. deny that

consult allies
travel rules

I. W. Abel

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PARIS (m)-U.S. representatives
conferred yesterday on strategy
for the next session of the dead-
locked Vietnam talks. But the
thunder of propaganda guns from
Hanoi made the goal of peace
seem as distant now as when these
conversations began five weeks
ago.
U.S. Ambassador W. Averell
Harriman put in a working day,,
part of it in conference with his
deputy, Ambassador Cyrus R.
'Vance.
The two, along with their aides,
studied the statements to date of
the North Vietnamese and newr
blasts from North Vietnam's capi-
tal.
North Vietnam, for its part, has
kept up its sustained propaganda
attack. The latest barrage came
yesterday in the form of an inter-

view of the Algiers newspaper El
Moudjahid with Defense Minister
Vo Nguyen Giap, the North Viet-
namese general who masterminded
the battle of Dien Bien Phu and
the Viet Minh strategy that ousted
France from Indochina in 1954.
The newspaper quoted Giap as
saying that all the current battles
in South Vietnam are part of new
,nd long-term Dien Bien Phu in
which he said "victory is ours-
that is certain.
Gap, the newspaper said, was
asked whether a victory such as
seizure of an important city lile
Saigon might open the way to
some sort of accord in Paris, as
the fall of Dien Bien Phu had led
to the 1954 settlement at Geneva.
Giap replied that no historical
analogy was ever complete, but
that there were parallels in the

two situations, adding that he
was confident in the ultimate vic-
tory of "the whole people of Viet-
nam."
The North Vietnamese defense
minister claimed President John-
son, while talking of peaceful in-
tentions, was continuing massive
bombardment of "the most im-
portant part of our territory," and
added: "Is this new proof of the
peaceful intentions of the Amer-
icans? I don't think so."
The territory Giap referred to
lies in the panhandle of the coun-
try below the 20th parallel. John-
son on March 31 limited the bom-
bardment to the area south of that
line, and his action led to the cur-
rent talks in Paris.
However, the President now is
believed to be under mounting
pressure to modify his restraint
order, in view of the rocket bom-
bardment of Saigon. The attacks
are viewed here as an attempt of
the North Vietnamese and the
Viet Cong to win some sort of
military advantage which would
give them a heavy and perhaps
decisive advantage in the Paris
talks.
In some quarters it is considered
possible that unless the attacks on
Saigon come to an end, the United
States will be persuaded eventual-
ly that its restraint in the bomb-
ing of the North has failed to pay
off.

MEETING:

-Associated Press
Abandoning violence
star Rex Allen yesterday hung up his $2,500 six-shooters
r." Allen said the events of the last few months, par-
y the assassinations, prompted him to rethink his use of
struments of murder or violence." He said he hopes other
will do the same.

Ew r osUchoose. candidate
SA, Okla. (IP)-.There -were no indications yesterday that
n governors would emerge from their two-day conference
ed behind any of the announced or potential candidates for
presidential nomination.
n't see how they can come up with a concensus," said Gov.
irk of Florida. Gov. Ronald Reagan of California, regarded
ntial candidate, agreed with Kirk.
Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York said the conference "is
me or the place" for him to seek public expressions of sup-
s drive for the nomination.
ver, reports circulated that Rockefeller might soon get a
boost in the form of some 50 votes from the Pennsylvania
a. Gov. Shafer, answering a question, refused to confirm or
he is preparing to announce his support for Rockefeller
ion a television program "Meet the

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National news roundup,

The House by
the Stable
and
Grab and Grace
TW OPLAYS
by Charles William
7:00 P.M.
at
Christian Reformed Church
1717 Broadway

By The Associated Press
TRACY, Minn. - An army
of about 1,500 rescue workers
swarmed over this tornado-devas-
tated town yesterday, pulling dead
and injured from the wreckage
and trying to return the town to
normal.
Authorities said at least nine
persons died and 300 were injured
when the twister smashed through
the small farm town Thursday
evening.
Some 300 homes and businesses
were destroyed or damaged by the
tornado which caused about $3
million damage. The federal gov-
ernment declared Lyon County and
adjacent counties a disaster area.
* * *
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - George
Wallace, declaring "every person

is a racist by somebody's defini-
tion," insisted again yesterday he
is running for president on a bi-
racial platform.
"I would like to have the sup-
port of Negro citizens of Nashville
and Tennessee," Wallace told
newsmen after arriving from At-
lanta on the fourth day of a fund-
raising swing through the South.
* * *
NEW YORK - The Kennedy
family will broadcast a message
to the nation over the three tele-
vision networks today to express
their appreciation for kindnesses
during the period of mourning for
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and
Mrs. Rose Kennedy will speak for
the family from the compound at
Hyannis Port, Mass.

Press" next Sunday.
}Shafer and a number of Penn..
sylvania delegates have long been
regarded as supporters of Rocke-
feller.
"I have committed myself as a
favorite son," Shafer said, "Aid
will not make any change until I
have completed my discussion
with my own delegation. Then we
will make a decision."
Rockefeller's aides also were
elated over the results of a poll
published yesterday by the Min-
neapolis'Star-Tribune. The survey,
taken in late May before the as-
sassination of Sen. Robert F,,Ken-
nedy, showed:
Rockefeller 48 per cent, Vice
President Hubert Humphrey 46
per cent, 6 per cent undecided;
Richard M. Nixon 42 per cent,
Humphrey 52 per cent, 6 per cent
undecided; Rockefeller 49 per
cent, Sen. Eugene McCarthy 44
per cent, 7 per cent undecided;
McCarthy 49 per cent, Nixon 44
per cent, 7 per cent undecided.
Rockefeller mapped a heavy
schedule of appearances in Min-
nesota, and North ]Dakota for to-
day, followed by more intensive
campaigning the next week.
The strategy now, in his effort
to overtake Nixon, is to make as
many public appearances as possi-
ble, attend as many rallies as he
can, and strive for the maximum
amount of exposure for his ideas.
At the conference the governors
have been preparing a "handbook"
of legislative proposals to be used
as source material in writing the
GOP platform this year.

aa
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