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June 04, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-04

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 4, 1968

A lookat.
'Planet of the Apes'
by Daniel Okrent
THE FOX VILLAGE'S Planet of the Apes is one of the better
films I have seen in recent months. Making good use of
its obvious potential, and generally playing down the spots
which might make it far less palatable, screenwriters Michael
Wilson and Rod Serling and director Franklin Schaffner took
fine advantage of a good thing and played it into an entertain-
ing, intriguing motion picture.'
The premises from which it starts, taken from the novel by
Pierre Boulle, was a good foundation for the makers of the film
to apply their fitting tools. Charlton Heston (thank God this
isn't a "happy" film; too many of Heston's 85-tooth smiles
could make the viewer go blind within 15 minutes) is a man on
a planet ruled by, well, baboons. True, Heston, a lost space
voyager, is an intelligent, almost too sensitive man-but he is a
man, neverthelss. And the apes, lorded over by a very con-
vincing Maurice Evans, don't think much of men, who in their
experience are nothing more than wild beasts. For a little more
than two hours, we sit and watch a zany reversal of roles, and
groan under the weight of an agonizing load of indignities that
our fellow Homo sapiens endures.
THE FILM COULD have been an absolute failure if Schaff-
ner hadn't seen to it that "subtle" parallels remained uncon-
structed. Of course, the reason why it-wasn't turned into an ob-
tuse hawking of the standard Hollywood civil rights package
is that we couldn't really be told that we are too unkind to our,
four-legged (read this "Negro") friends. As Heston is beaten
and bashed and otherwise tormented, we see a bunch of monkies
knocking around a man. It would have stretched things if the
viewer were led to imagine that maybe this is how we treat our
Negro (read "four-legged") neighbors.
It isn't really that preposterous a suggestion. When Planet
of the Apes does stray into moralizing, it suffers. Pre-beast
Heston, when he first lands on the alien planet, is portrayed as
a misanthropic gadabout who is, looking for a race better than
greedy, unloving man; at the film's end he is offering a frene-
tic "I-told-you-so" lamentation of the fate of men as he learns
of what has happened fo them that led to the apes' placement
on top of the evolutionary heap.
BUT, GENERALLY, the film stays away from the holy crap.
Instead, it flexes its true muscle with repeated flashes of ima-
gination and playfulness. The much-ballyhooed make-up for
the apes may not be as convincing as that of the straggle-haired
neanderthals Stanley Kubrick offers in the opening movement
of 2001: A Space Odyssey, but it is far more enjoyable, and lends
itself to the mixed society of futurism and backwardness that
charactizes apes' society.
Similarly, Heston's frustrations-at first, he cannot show his
captors how intelligent he is because an injury has cost him his
speech facility-are played out and lengthened and stretched
and squeezed for all their worth, then are summarily exploded
when he utters his first words just before an excruciatingly
placed intermission.

RFK expected to edge McCarthy'

(Continued from Page 1)
any connection with the Lynch
slate, but the majority of its mem-
bers favor him.
In response to a kennedy sug-
gestion that the two join after
the California primary to fight
the presidential bid of Vice Presi-
dent Humphrey, McCarthy said
"under no circumstances" would
he do so.
In the South Dakota primary,
Vice President Humphrey is ex-
pected to make his strongest bid
Police patr

to overtake Sens. Kennedy and
McCarthy. I
However Humphrey's name is
not on the ballot. President
Johnson is on the ballot. Since
no write-in votes are allowed in
the state, Humphrey backers
waged a high-pressure campaign
to convince Democrats that a
vote for LBJ is really a vote for
Humphrey.
The 24-member slate previously'
committed to the P r e s i d e n t
switched its allegiance to Hum-

phrey after Johnson decided not But a list-minute. write-in
to seek re-election. campaign on behalf of former
The Kennedy forces rebutted Vice President Nixon has shaken
the Humphrey campaign tactics GOP ranks-'in the state.
by arguing that a vote for John- Robert R. Douglass, campaign
son will be interpreted as sup- manager for Gov. Nelson A. Rock-
port for the President's adminis- efeller, charged that Nixon forces
tration whose agricultural policies had violated a pact that neither
are highly unpopular in this farm candidate would attempt to sway
and ranch state, any of the 40-member delegation.
Richard M. Nixon is running Diouglass termed the write-in
unopposed on the GOP ballot and campaign by the New Jersey Nix-
only a toen amount of the 165,- on Now Committee a "tricky
282 Republicans are expected to maneuver."}
visit the polls. Edward Bond, Nixon Now
A bid for convention delegates chairman, yeplied that no su'ch
by McCarthy and 'an eleventh pact existed, and said Nixon him-
hour wtrie-in campaign by sup- self cautioned against such a,
porters of Nixon highlight today's campaign.
New Jersey primary. _
While the New Jersey contest
is overshadowed by the California B acksprotest
clash between McCarthy and .
Kennedy, the delegation 'selected atGlh gh e ool
Democratic convention at Chicago("e P
in August. (Continued from Page 1)
Delegates pledged to McCarthy voted nearly unanimously to sup-
will challenge an uncommitted port the black demands.
slate pledged to Gov Richard B Later that afternoon, the fac-

Senate may receive
- -I
Negro educati0 bi
WASHINGTON (CPS) - Sen. tions is only about three per cent.
Harrison A. Williams Jr., a mem- On most white campuses, black
ber of the Senate Education Sub- students compose less than one
committee, plans to present to} per cent of the student body.
Congress a far-reaching legisla- An aide to Williams noted the
tive package designed to bring proposed legislation definitely
about the fuller integration of "would have to affect the future
Negroes into higher education. of Negro colleges. We will have
The details of the legislation to take a good. hard look at them
have not been worked out yet. before drawing up a bill."

ol AAHS,

enforce 'martial law'
(Continued from Page 1) Westerman informed the pr
After school began, Westerman testers, "There is a general sch
told the protesters "I think you regulation barring the unauth
hurt our ability to conduct an rized distribution of materialc
orderly school." He added, "Our campus."
objective is to provide an atmos- The pickets left the sch
phere of calm. Disruptive activity campus 45 minutes later, and i
sets us back in our task and puts turned to renew their protest
us in danger." 2:45 p.m., near the end of scho
--_____ _ -- Schreiber said school proceed
in an orderly manner and wit
out any serious incident. Obser
ers from Ann Arbor Human R
1l w I e lations Commission and, the Pa
ent Teacher Organization w
present in the school.
(Continued from Page 1) When the pickets returned
ment included more than just the the afternoon, Ann Arbor Poli
two changes to which Cutler has Chief Walter Krasny told the
conceded. "There is the possibility if y
The group includes SGC Presi- cooperate with us there will1
dent Michael Koeneke, SGC Ex- no injunction filed by the scho
ecutive Vice President Robert board." He said police wouldr
Neff, Prof. Irving Copi, chairman turn again today.
of the Senate Advisory Committee ' The protesters separated i
on University Affairs, and Prof. three groups to picket the th]
Robert Knauss, of the law school major qxits of the buildi
and a member of the Hatcher Again the high school studen
Commission. crossed the picket lines with
Cutler expressed doubt as to incident, many of them accepti
whether he could accept any other the leaflets offered to them.
recommendations at this time. The students took the proteste
He 'said he would submit the In stride. "I think they (
ad hoc group's bylaw proposal to pickets) have the right tot
the Regents "if the document is whatever picketing they want
exactly as Mr. Neff, Mr. Koeneke, do," said one. "They seem to1
Prof. Copi, Prof. Knauss and my experienced in this sort of thin
fstaff and I originally wrote and she added.
agreed upon," with the exception Another said, "I say that if th
of the two concessions. yt ..,,r n c

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hey

But Sen. Williams (D-N.J.), has
announced he hopes the legisla-
tion can be included in the 1968
higher education bill now being
considered by the Senate Educa-
tion Subcommittee.
Williams said he has 'invited
leading Negro and white educat-
ors, sociologists, representatives
of foundations, civil rights lead-
ers, and legislators to attend a
one-day workshop during the
third week in May on the problem
of integrating higher education.
He said participants in the work-
shop will be asked to contribute
ideas, for the proposed legislation,
The percentage of Negroes at
the nation's public and private
universities is only 5.6 per cent,
Williams found. Negro enrollment'
at predominantly white institu-

In his statjient, Williams said,
."There are no greater domestic
needs than to ;bring Negroes fully
into the mainstream of American
cultural and economic life and to
build understanding between Ne-
groes and whites. There isno et-
ter place/to accomplish both these
aims than the college campus. Ad-
ditionally, the intellectual, moral,
and social values of those who will
lead the nation are molded to a
great degree at college, -and this
should not be done in an atmos-
phere which excludes the Negro."
Williams said white colleges
have a growing awareness of the
need to bring about greater Negro
enrollment, and "some of them
have made substantial beginning
efforts to bring this about."

-_ 4 j+ U 4 -v . ililq1 .
Hughes, said to be leaning toward
Vice President Humphrey.
Hughes, who was a staunch
supporter of President Johnson
but has remained publicly neutral
since Johnson's withdrawal from
the race, says McCarthy may wind
up with 20 of the state's 82 con-
vention delegates.
Supporters of the Minnesota
senator predict their man will
gather at least 15 delegates.
"Hughes has conceded us 20
delegates but we'll be very happy
with 15," said a spokesman for
Volunteers for McCarthy.
On the Republican side, the
uncommitted GOP ticket, is head-
ed by Sen. Clifford P. Case, a
potential favorite-son candidate.

ulty appointed a committee to
consder the 21 demands to report
their conclusions to the board of
education May 29.
The situation was relatively
calm until two fights broke out
last Wednesday between white
and Negro students. The school
was closed and' all students sent
home after police broke up the
disturbance. Classes were called
off until yesterday.
At a ten-hour meeting last Fri-
day, the board of education
adopted fifteen of the original
demands of the black students.
The faculty stated that "all
other demands not specifically
acted upon shall be referred to
the citizens advisory board."

{
}
i
)

Ending
Wednesday

1

TONIGHT
at 7-9 P.M.

r(p MCA.

DIAL
6-6290

inciuding
BEST ACTOR ROD STEIGER
MIRISCH
iiSIDNEY POITIER ROD STEIGER
,THE NORMAN JEWISON-WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
A li f 10T OFTW ENIGTM"
COLOR by OsDOLUI iM2J United APtists
FRIDAY: "YOUNG GIRLS OF ROCHEFORT"

4

"SUPERIOR ENTERTAINMENT -warmth and wisdom meka
the laughter even more enjoyable!" -Life 'Magazine

'L

'DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
~ ': i.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan - for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN . form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, JUNE 4
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "The Maangement of Manag-
ers No. 60, North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to
9:00 p.m.j
Advanced Fire School II - Registra-
tion, Civil Defense Center, 8:30 a.m.,
Mon., June 2.
General Notices
Botany Seminar: Dr. David Francis,
University of British Columbia will
speak on "Differentiation in Slime
Molds," Wed., June 5, at 4:15 p.m.,
1139 Nat. Scl. Bldg.
Foreign Visitors
The following are foreign visitors
who can be reached through the For-
eign Visitor Programs Office, 764-2148.
Mr. Ifeanyi Ogbu, Secretary, Commit-
tee of Vice-Chancellors of Nigerian
Universities, National Universities
Commission, June 2-9.
Mr. Kyoshi Igarashi, Dean of the
Law School, Hokkaido University, Ja-
pan, June 4-6.
Dr. Shanta Rao, Officer in Charge,

Reproductive Physiology Unit, Indian I
Council of Medical Research, Seth
G. S. Medical College, Bombay, June
3-9.
Eleven Indians, Ten judges and one
lawyer, June 11.
Doctoral Exams
Hiroshi Maki, Chemistry, Disserta-
tion: "Esterolytic Catalyses by Copoly-
mers of 4(5)-Vinylimidazole with Acid
Somonomers," Mon., June 3, 11 a.m.,
Rm. 3003 Chemistry. Chairman: C. G.
Overberger.
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings Received
by General Division by mail and phone
-please call 764-7460 for further infor-
mation:
Torrington Area Health District, Tor-
rington, Conn. - Public Health Sani-
tarian, mileage and benefits paid, sub-
mit resume.
Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc.,
Southfield, Mich. - Publisher's Rep-
resentative, 9 openings, sale of college

texts through professors, academic at-
mosphere, editorial responsibility based
on soliciting and screening manuscripts
for publication, man, BA/MA Sci., Lib.
Arts,, all majors, or Bus. Ad., age 21-28,
experience open.
Local Firm - Salesman of photog-
raphy, sportswear and party favors to
fraternities and sororities at several
Michigan colleges and Universities. Op-
por. to become partner in the com-,
pany, man, recent grad, pref. Bus. Ad.
member or familiar with Greek System.
R. & M. Kaufmann, Inc., Detroit,
Mich., - General Assistant to senior
salesman with sales and office work
to learn the business of marketing and
sales, good future with large dress
manufacturer, man, degree in bus, ad.,
pref. mktg. related courses.
International Atomic Energy Agency,
Base in Wash. D.C. for hiring, all posi-
fixed two year terms. Technical open-
tions in this bulletin are in Vienna for
ings in areas of nuclear power and re-
actors, isotopes, physics section, Lab.
Seibersdorf, Health, Safety and Waste
Disposal, Food and agriculture, one ,
non-tech. position for acctg. degree
and 6 yrs. exper. Tech. positions gen-
erally req. PhD. and 10-15 yrs. in this
field.

wvane o wam aroun an me sun
like that, it's okay with me."
Near the end of the day Sch-
reiber gave reasons for what he'
called "drastic measures" taken
by the administration. "There was
a definite plan by a group of
white students to take violent re-
taliation in response to last week's
racial disturbances," he said.
Schreiber said the crisis forced
him to take 17 members' of his
staff of counselors and class ad-
visors off their normal, duties.
"I assigned 12 of them to ac-
company plainclothes policemen
in their patrol of the halls," he
said. "The other five supervised."
Schreiber specified that the
function of the police was to
"only observe what happens and
not to attempt to enforce school
rules." However, there were re-
ports from students that unac-
companied policemen were check-
ing corridor passes by themselves.
Second class postage paid at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 420 Maynard St., Ann
Arbor, Michigan, 48104,
Daily except Monday during regular
academic school year.
Fall and. winter subscription rate:
$4.50 per term by carrier ($5 by mail);
$8.00 for regular academic school year
($9 byinail).

OLOR
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"THE BRILlANT SLEEPER FILM OF THE YEAR. I am so
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-Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan
"THE THINKING MAN'S COMEDY OF THE YEAR! Utterly
delightful. 'Bedazzled' is bedazzling!"
-Judith Crist, NBC-TV TODAY SHOW
"THE BEST COMEDY AROUND. Peter Cook and Dudley
Moore turn in wonderfully sardonic performances in this
image shattering bawdy, unprincipled funny funny film.
In the hands of these two men 'Bedazzled' rises to
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"A FLUFFY AND FUNNY VERSION ofthe Faust legend in
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-Newsweek Magazine

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This is Commander Taylor. Astronaut.
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RAQUEL WELCH as Lust

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