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May 21, 1968 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1968-05-21

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, May 21, 1968

N

Tuesday. Mov 21 196~

a

I

records

Riggs'
By R. A. PERRY
There is no record-company
today which can produce the
monthly number of releases
that Columbia continues to
pour onto the market. Accord-
ingly, when the producers de-
cide to feature one of their art-
ists, they do so in an enthusias-
tic and all-out fashion.
May, for instance, has been
declared E. Power Biggs Month
and Columbia has released no
less than ten re'cordings by this
seemingly omnipresent Ameri-
can organist.
The major release in this or-
gan orgy comes in a two vol-
ume set comprising the sixteen
organ concerti of George Fred-
erick Handel. A certain amount
of controversy has surrounded
this set '(D3S 777-8), in which

organ orgy:

Baroque,

Biggs is accompanied by the
London Philharmonic under the
aegis of Sir Adrian Boult.
The Columbia production
crew, at the instigation of Biggs
no doubt, sought and found an
authentic organ upon which
Handel himself was known to
have played. When Columbia
thus professed sonic authenti-
city, the D.G.G. Archive ,Co,'
which also recently issued an
integral set of the concerti,
cried foul.
The "Handel organ," they as-
serted, had been adjusted to
meet the tuning pitch of the
modern orchestra, and thus Co-
lumbia's claim was spurious.
Biggs retorted that the pipes
were only raised a fraction of a
semi-tone, and that D.G.G. was
merely a sour grapes company.

In any case, the Handel or-$
gan of the Great Packington
Abbey in Warwickshire, Eng-
land, sounds sweet, rich, and
justly limited in swell. Some
tracker noise can be heard, but
seldom does it become discon-
certing. Biggs is at his exuber-
ant best, and Boult hones the
scaled-down Philharmonic into
an incisive and idiomatic part-
ner.
Handel often used these con-
certi, six in Opus 4, six in Opus
7, and four miscellaneous works
(Grove lists twenty-one, but
many are transcriptions), as
interludes in his oratorios. Used
thus to lighten a concert at-
mosphere, the works comprise
airs, dance forms, pomposo
marches, and free fugues.
I first came to know these

lively, open, and tunefu
in now-deleted Epic rec
which featured the orga
hannes Kohler in simp
relaxed performances
still enchant me.
Biggs uses an older, mi
thentic score and hisv
abound in enriching or
tation, though they ar
what more serious and
mined. Columbia has p
full and rich sound w
end-groove distortion.
And there certainly
not be any end-groove
tion, since the record si
erage only fifteen minut
This bit of extravagance
lumbia's part is balance
ever, by the fact that the
record sets sell for the
two.
If you wish to caution

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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beautifl
il works dulge in the enjoyable fare,
cordings Volume I may serve your pur-
nist Jo- poses better, for it contains the
)le and thoroughly winning numbers
which four to six.
For Bach, Biggs will not win
iore au- everyone's vote of -confidence.
versions Many prefer the more convinc-
namen- ing spiritual fervor of the blind
e some- German organist Helniut Wal-
l deter- ca, and some enthusiasts are
rovided turning to the cleanly delineat-
with *o ed structures rendered by the
Englishman Lionel Rogg.
should Biggs' approach may be lik-
distor- ened to that of Leonard Bern-
des av- stein - an all out enjoyment of
es each. making music which sometimes
on Co- subsumes, in its headlong zeal,
d,' how- lighter and finer shades of
e three- phrasing.
price of On MS 7108, Biggs presents
three Prelude and Fugues
usly in- (BWV 549, 539, and 533) and
the six Schubler Chorale Pre-
ludes. It is the latter group of
pieces, favorites of Bach him-
self, which give the disc its
special distinction. Published
when Bach was 61, the chorale
preludes derive from instru-
mental movements of the can-
mmas. Ar- tatas and they exhibit the same
Morocco, range of dramatic feeling, not
sion spec- mere compositional agility, that
Ile, radio-
, reactor the cantatas do.
phy and Moving from the ecstatic.
trom, nteters.
d int dolor of Bach to the splendor
c gauges. of Spanish ceremonial music
oil chem. requires a change in organ
bia, radi a- sound as well. In Historic Or-
gans of Spain (MS,7109), Biggs
io -_ sys waxes gloriously on the great
math plus cathedral organs of Toledo, Se-
engineer govia, Salamanca, and Madrid.
st. mgmt
an. Cost Little of this comnmemorative
tors and music is profound (Soler, Seix-
mer prod- as, Valente, Pasquini) and the
chem, de- organs themselves are rightly
arporation, highlighted.
al Engrs., The organ of Toledo Cathed-
BS plus ral emerges as an enormous
Smist, B fusty bagpipe that whines and
ngrg. Me- growls, spotlighted by the spe-
o yrs. Ac- cialty of the house, the trumpet
rnal Aud-
in acetg reed stops. Segovia too pos-
or, data sesses an organ of unique sound
exper, and when it is singing out So-
Chicago, ler's "pop goes the weasel" son-
ct, Natur- ata in A, few will not want to
join in the march.

WASHINGTON (CPS) - A pass the Senate. But the amend-
Senate subcommittee completed ment faces several obstacles to
hea ings this week on a Consti- adoption which were brought out
tutional amendment to lower the in the subcommittee testimony.
voting age to 18. A big problem in getting the
Affected would be 12 million bill through the Senate may be
persons between the ages of 18 the argument that the decision
and 21, 47 per cent of whom are on a minimum voting age should
college students. Only Georgia be left to the individual states.
and Kentucky have lowered the Several opponents of the bill ar-
voting age to 18, while Alaska gued that 18-year-olds should not
and Hawaii, when entering the be given the vote because they do
Union, had voting ages of 19 and not have many other legal rights
20 respectively. of citizenship, such as making

draft eligibility. They argued that
if 18-year-olds 'were being asked
to die for American foreign pol-
icy objectives, they ought' to have
a role in shaping those objectives.
The recent wave of student
demonstrations may also prove to
be an obstacle, especially in the
House, which recently voted to
deny federal aid to students who
participate in unlawful campus
demonstrations.
At the hearings, opponents of
the bill, including Sens. Spessard
Holland (D-Fla.) and Jack Mil-

to i

The bill is sponsored by 44 sen-;
ators, including Majority LeaderX
Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.) and
Minority Leader Everett Dirkson3
(R-Ill.), and thus seems likely to
Florida Stat

contracts and marrying, with

rout I

parental consent. ler (R-Iowa), said that the dem-
Supporters responded that 18- onstrations show a lack of ma-
year-olds do have many adult re- turity on the part of many 18, 19,
sponsibilities, including their and 20-year-olds, who "are prone
to take an extreme point of view
and push their ideas to the ex-
ex clusion of all others," acc'ording
to Mller.
perhaps the greatest obstac~le

4

Lowered voting age bill faces
tough battle in Congress, states

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which Tpie
Michigan Daily assumes no edi/or-
lal responsibility. Notes should be
sent in TYPEWRTTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear Only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
miore ififormation call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, MAY 21
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"The Management of Managers
No. 59": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
Basic Firemanship Training Course
1 - Morning Session, Civil Defense
Center, 8:30 a.m.
Baseball - U-M vs. Central Michigan
University, Ferry Field, 3:30 p.m.
Department of Psychiatry Lecture -
Natalie Shainess, M.D., Asst. Clinical
Professor, New York School of Psy-
chiatry,, "Images of Woman: Past and
Present, Overt and Obscured": Aud.;
Children's Psychiatric Hospital, 4:30
p.m.
General Notices
Tuition Refund Schedule-The Reg-
istrar will honor student refunds
through 4:00 p.m. on the dates given
below.

plication blanks are available in Rm. Mr. Eikichi Otsuka, Staff member,
3014, Rackham Bldg. for thb National Placement office, Waseda University,
Teacher Examinations. The next ad- Japan, May 27.
ministration of the test will be on
Saturday, July 6, and applications
must be received in Princeton, Newa
Jersey by June 14. Plc m n

scopy of
gentina,
uranium
troscopy.
isotopes
phys. IL
eectrom
Iraq, rad
engrg. y
Greece,
Ecuador,
topes in

Law School Admission Test: Appli-
cation blanks are available in Room
3014 Rackham Bldg. forthe Law School
Admission Test. The next administra-
tion of the test will be on Sat., Aug.
3, and applications are due in Prince-
ton, N.J. by July-13.
Foreign Visitors'
The following are foreign visitorso
who can be reached through the For-
eign Visitor Programs Office, 764-2148.
Mr. . and Mrs. G. G. Mbau, AfricanI
Personnel Officer, de Beers Mines,,
South Africa, May 17-25,
Miss Patricia O'Connell, Public
Health Nursing, England, May 22-25.
Prof. Julio Vega, Dean of the School
of Economics, National Autonomous1
University of Nicaragua, May 22-25.
Prof. Arnold Weddle, Dept. of Land-
scape Architecture, University of Shef-
field, England, May 22-24.
Dr. Milos Kalab, Dr. Zdenek Strmis-t
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of this column for announce- z
ments is available to officially
recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are t
available in room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Bach Club meeting, Thurs., May 23,
8:00 p.m. Guild House, 802 Monroe,
speaker: Dale Bonge, "The Unseent
Structure in Bach's Music," for fur-e
ther information please call 769-2922 crt
769-1605.1
* * ,
Christian Science Organization Testi-j
mony rpeeting, Thurs., 7:30 p.m., Rm.
3545 S.A.B.
ka, Director and Deputy Director, In-j
stitute of Sociology of Czechoslovakt
Academy of Sciences, Czechoslovakia,1
May 27-28,

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION

1
#]
;,i
ii

ion cee
Interview Announcement: Wednesday,
May 22: B. F.
Navy Employment Office, Great Lakes, tems An
Ill. (35 min. from the Loop) is seeking computes
any degree graduates, August and De- trainee,
cember, for positions in the areas of BA. Dii
personnel, computer work, manage- Acct.,(
ment and budget analysis, bus ad., and trainees.
any engineering-fields. Appointments ucts. Te
are at levels GS-5 and 7. Federal Serv- gree, col
ice Entrance Exam, required and can A
be given at the interview, Wednesday, Ancho
May 22. Scoring will be done on the Lancaste
spot. Please call 764-7460 if interested 5-,0'o e
in these, and arrange for the interview. 51ntros
physical,
Current Position Openings RteceiWd chanical
by General Division by mail and phone itors, m
-please call 764-7460 for further infor- Commun
mation :processin
Navy Activities Employment Office, Cook4
Great Lakes, Ill. - See above for in- Ill - F+
terview arrangements, Personnel Man- alist I,1
agement' Trainee, on-the-job trng.,
and some classroom train. Assignments Linda
in recruiting, promotions, wage and'teriais S
salary admin., grievances and disciplin- son with
ary actions, employee development and visual ea
special training 1ianagement Analyst Midwe
Trainee, analyzing, evaluating, devel- City, M,
oping, advising on, or promoting im- BS. Mic
privement in mgmt. policies, practices, PhD. pr
methods, procedures and organization- PhD. A
al structures. Chemical
International Atomic Enegry Agen- lyst, que
cy, Contact Bureau for further infor- ming, i
mation, locations listed below. Requests producti
from foreign government for expert ment si
advisors/consultants in many areas of! PERT
atomic energy usage. Assignments may necess.(
vary from 3 mos. to 2 yrs., most re- Statistici
quire advanced degrees and extensive or ci.i
experience. Romania, gamma ray spec- or Exper
troscopy. Yugoslavia, radiation chem. tree req.
Bulgaria, radioisotopes. Nicaragua.
health physics. Nigeria, nuclear phys.
Hungary, chem. radiation dosimetry,
Uruguay, U.A.R., and Turkey, radio-
isotopes, (agricult.). Tunisia, neutron
physics: Thailand, gamma radiography,
food preservation. Singapore and Ecua
dor, health physics. Austria, nuclear
phys. or engrg. Peru, China, and Bo-
livia, radio chem. Pakistan, spectro-

neutron capture ga
radioisotopes prod,
geol. Mexico, emis
Lebanon.and Chi
(Agricult.). "Korea,
srael, radiocardiogra
ignetic mass spec
lation protection In
w/exper. in nucleoni
radioisotopes in so
Radioblol. Cyprus,
entomology. Colom
sm.
Goodrich, Akron, Oh
al., physical sci. orn
r exper. Industrial
BBA, math or Indu
stribution Statistici
degree. Field audi
Sales trainees, consu
chnical Librarian,c
rmputer exper.
r Hocking Glass Co
r, Ohio - Industri
xper. Electrical Engr
s.Electronics Spedi
syst., 0-5 yrs. Che
ChE or Ceramic er
Engr., BS plus 5-10
s, BS, no exper. Inte
An. 1 yr. exper, BS
ications Coordinat
g, degree plus 5 yrs.
County Civil Service,
orest Preserve Distri
nat'l. sci. BS degree

resigns following protest
TAILAHASSEE, Fla. (CPS)- however, held an emergency meet-
Florida State University President ing and refused to accept Chain-
John Champion resigned this pion's resignation. Champion has
week in the wake of a censorship not responded to the board's ac-
dispute over the use of four letter tion, but many observers think he
words in the campus literary will make his resignation stick.
magazine, but the board of re- Others say he can be persuaded{
Dents has refused to accept the to stay.
resignation. Three of Champion's assistants
Champion resigned after the resigned along with him.
arts and sciences faculty, repre-
senting the largest college in the
university, held a special meeting Wednesday & Thursday
to discuss the administration's DEPARTMEN
censorship of student publications. STUDENT LABOR
The faculty . tabled by a vote of pres
175-165 a motion to censure the MAID TC
president and demand his resig-
nation if he would not reverse by EUGEN
his decision to censor an article
written for the Legend, the liter-
ary magazine.

r

4:10 P.M.

T OF SPEECH
ATORY THEATRE
sents
)MARRY
E IONESCO
WARFS
LD PINTER

.4,

of all is the problei of getting the
required three-fourths of the
state legislatures to approve the
amendment
State legislatures have been ex-
tremely reluctant to lower the
voting age below 21. The legisla-
tures have been reluctant to even
-but the voting age on the ballot
in many states. In 43 states, leg-
islatures,hhave considered propos-
als to put the voting age on the
ballot, but only 11 have done so.

by HAROL

The, president announced his
resignation only 30 minutes after
the faculty vote. "In view of this
sentiment, I hereby tender hny
resignation, effective immediate-
ly," he said. His statement also
said, "It is evident that It no
longer enjoy the confidence of a
major segment of this university
faculty."
The Florida board of regents,

22nd and 23rd May Admission Free
ARENA THEATRE, FRIEZE BUILDING

W

Atchinson Instructional Ma-C---
5ervic, Monroe, Mich. - Per-
some sales exper. and audio
xper. preferred, will train. j
st Research Institute, Kansasa
o. - Biologist-Bacteriologist,
robiol-Virologist-Immunologist,
ef, Physiologist-biochem., MS/
analytical Chemist, MS/PhD.
SEngr.BS/MS plus 0-3 yrs.
r Associate, Operational Ana-j
ueing theory, linear program-
nventory theory, simqlation,
on sched. Associate Manaae-I
systems Specialist, CPM and
techniques, computer exper.
Chemical Physicist, PhD. Bic-
an, adv. degree in engrg., math
fld. Human Factors En[iner
rimental Psychologist, adv. de-

Kind of
Refund
100 %
Withdrawal
Reduction,
course load
50%

Spring-
Summer
Term

Spring'
1z
Term

Summer
Tr
Term

Shows at
1,3, 5, 7,
& 9:05
DIAL
5-6290 p a
simaa
NO iID K[~iDY Mi ORO KENNEDY to die!"
S811MuR P0Mo8COIRODON EASTMANCOwR
COMING FRIDAY: "P.J."

incluang
BET TRROD STEIGER j
THECf'R MRAIO esCH RO
CRA SIDNEY POITIER ROD STEIGER
nIHE NORMAN IEWISON-WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
N EORNIEALTE sF TIEdPNIChl T
IN MMTOMWCOLOR byiLuxe <i sa United Artists

May 15 May 15 July 11
May 15 May 15 May 15

DIAL
861416

Withdrawal June 13 May 22 July 13
Appropriate adjustments will be
made for students in schools having
opening dates other than May 1 and
June 26.
Colloquium in Education-Dr. Robert
Rosenthal, Psychologist, Harvard Uni-
versity, co-author with Lenore Jacob-
son of Pygmalion in the Classroom:;
Teacher Expectations and Pupil Per-
formance, will speak on "Ethics of
Deception in Research" and "Teach-
ers' Expectations: Determinants of Pu-
pils' IQ Gains" may 22, 4200 UHS, 4-6
p.m.
The University of Michigan presents
the first annual Arthur H. Vanden-
berg Lecture, on May 22, at 8;00 p.m.,
in the Rackham Amphitheater. The
lecturer will be Mr. James B. Reston,
Executive Editor of The New York
Times, who will speak on "The Van-
denberg Tradition." This lecture is
open to the public without charge.
Regents' Meeting: Friday, June 21.
Communications for consideration at
this meeting must be in the Presi-
dent's hands no later than Thursday,
June 6.
The Department of Linguistics has
scheduled the M.A. French and German
language examinations for May 28th
and 29th. Please sign up in the depart-
mental office (218 Gunn Bldg. or
phone 764-0353) as soon as possible.
The preliminary examinations for the
department will be offered on June 6
and 7. Please sign up in the depart-
mental office (764-0353) as soon as pos-
sible.
National Tecaher Examinations: Ap-

7 and 9 P.M.

r

mono="

NO 2-6264
2o Di
pE R= un Davis

at 1:15-3:15-5 20
7:20-9 30

CtNt
TI

DON'T WRITE HOME!
Send
764-0058

COLOR BY DELUXE _
A S14NARIS HAMMER PRODUCTION
{ ex'Mary TylerM,
A 6 FT. KARATE
EXPERT WRITES A
SEXBOOK..and .0-
"don't just STAND there!"
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE ECHI4IICOLOR_

HELD OVER-ONLY 2 MORE DAYS
"IT SHOULD BE SEEN"-Okrent, Doily
"A MOST EXTRAORDINARY FILM!
-NEW YORK TIMES

DOORS OPEN 7:00 P.M.
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES "0
FOH VILLaGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-.769-1300

VERY LAST DAY
BEACH RED 7:40 Only

1,000,000,000 BRAIN 9:30 Only

STARTS TOMORROW.
DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM

I

_.__i.___._____ - -

ONE OF
THE MANY
WOMEN...
who
stopped
at nothing
to win!

THE
ALGERIAN
STREET
BOY..
who becam
a rebel
hero!-

THE
FRENCH
COLONEL...
who was
e forced even'
to torture!
b ~*,.

!r

BATTLE OF
THE REVOLT
WHAT STIRRED
THE WORLD"
§ A AEAR TISTS
Gene Wes un Albert Schwartz Hamr Diamond p v A FILM OF GIIIO !PONTiECORVO Releas

2ND FEATURE

You are cordially
invited toenjoy
a perfectly p

f ..
/

CHARLES K.
FELDMAN
JOSEPH L.

- ili 'WWA -"W* w-

I

I I

I,

1 ,

I

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