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September 20, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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11

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"LOTS OF
FUN "
-N.Y. Herald Tribune

View Student Involvement
Within Larger Community

Williams' Son Heads
Kennedy Movement

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Homecoming Meeting

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DIAl. NO 5-6290

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nto the
uture

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'Solid Entertain-
ment" - N.Y.
Daily News

ROD TAYLOR - ALAN YOUNG

Dial
Q-6264

4

ENDS
FRIDAY

By ANDREW HAWLEY
The broadening scope of the
student's role within and beyond
the University community was
the general topic of an informal
discussion at the Friend's Center
Sunday night.
Vice President for Student Af-
fairs James A. Lewis, Student
Government Council President
John Feldkamp, '61, and Daily
Editor Thomas Hayden, '61, were
the principal speakers. Each dis-
cussed an aspect of the respon-
sibilities confronting today's stu-'
dents, before the meeting, attend-
ed by approximately 20 students,
was opened to general discussion.
Emphasizes Total Student
Lewis, who spoke first, empha-
sized the necessity neither to dis-
ROTC Unit
To Convene
Pershing Rifles Company D-3
will hold four "get-acquainted"
smokers, the first at 7:30 p.m.
tonight in the Army's Temporary
Classroom Bldg, behind the Den-
tistry School.
Subsequent smokers will be held
on Sept. 22, 27, and 29. Army,
Navy, and Air Force ROTC Stu-
dents are urged to attend.
Pershing Rifles is a competition
drill team, organized to help the
individual gain leadership ability
and skill at marching above that
of the average ROTC student.

NOYT EIIEATER SO~

F EXTRA
'rIfE BIG DSoutCEv
the stogy, of the0
echo satellite

tinguish the student as citizen
from the total community nor to
treat him as a child to be pam-
pered, but rather to consider him
as a force that is shaping the fu-
ture,
On the other hand, he noted,
the students should support other
elements of society in the search
for a better way of life and be
loyal to ideals for their own
sake, sooner than for the sake of
international competition. "To be
loyal in our society one must
sometimes refuse to conform,"
Lewis said. He pointed out the
need to "narrow the gap between
what we say and what we do."
Sees New Attitude
Hayden briefly traced the de-
cline of philosophic commitment
through the existential move-
ment to a virtual emotional vac-
uum in the United States in re-
cent years. He then described the
appearance of what he considers
a new attitude on the part of
students, and Itsospecific mani-
festations in the forms of politi-
cal and social action.
He then urged a change of the
student's commitment from pub-
student's commitment from pri-
vate to public. "Human love ex-
tended beyond a small circle" of
friends and family, and called
for "an attitude that asserts I
am capable of governing my af-
fairs and taking care of myself
and society."
Control Needed
The student, Hayden said,
should work toward controlling
all his affairs within the Univer-
sity and the public, both through
mass action such as picketing
and interaction in groups such as
the National Student Association,
and student governments.
He also advocated the forma-.
tion of a campus political party,
such as several other campuses
have, and, noted a crisis in stu-
dent governments, in that active
movements are moving away from
them to avoid the bureaucracy in-
volved in working through them
for reform.
Continuity a Problem
Finally, he mentioned the prob-
lem of continuity, of keeping the
level of awareness and involve-
ment high on American cam-
puses. "We will make or break
our generation in our college
years," he warned.
Feldkamp said the world crisis
arises from the conflict between
two basic philosophies, one based
on the individual and'his contri-
bution to society and the other
on society and its demands on
the individual. The student can
act on his own or in groups, he
said, but he noted the increasing
responsibility of students as in-
dividuals to act effectively in the
student movement if it dissatis-
fies them, because they are asso-
ciated with it anyway.

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
Registering students and pass-
ers-by at Waterman Gymnasium
had the opportunity to shake
hands and discuss political issues
with Gery Williams, son of Michi-
gan's Governor G. Mennen Wil-
liams.
Wearing a white paper hat and
Kennedy lapel pin, Williams dis-
tributed literature and spoke
about the Michigan 'Students for
Kennedy' movement, of which he
is chairman.
The movement is part of the
national Young Citizens for Ken-
nedy organization, , which has
Rea Reports
Loan Total
Shows Rise
Student loans at the University
increased by one-third last year to
$1.4 million, Dean of Men Walter
B. Rea says in his annual report
to University President Harlan
Hatcher.
Rea, chairman of the Commit-
tee on Student Loans, notes that
more than 7,500 individual loans
were processed by the committee
during 1959-1960. Total loans out-
standing rose to $1.9 million at
the- end of the fiscal year end-
ing last June.
Interest in scholarships contin-
ued to increase, he added. Over
2,000 high school seniors applied
for scholarships as entering fresh-
men. The Regents-Alumni Schol-
arships for full tuition were
awarded to 550 freshmen and 90
honorary scholarships of $50 were'
presented. -
In addition to these scholar-
ships and loans, the University
made 329 grants-in-aid last year
to men students, totalling more
than $50,000.

chapters all across the country.
The state chairman of the Michi-
gan Citizens for Kennedy andj
Johnson is University Regent Mc-
Inally.
To Enlist Members
Williams will spend the next
two weeks traveling around Mich-
igan enlisting members on cam-
puses including Wayne State and
Michigan State Universities.
He has taken a year's leave
of absence from Princeton Uni-
versity where he is a sophomore,
to work on the elections. He is
now working "from eight to 12"
in his father's Lansing office. Al-
though he is unsure what his own
plans will be after Nov. 8, Wil-
liams hopes that "some people
from Michigan will be moving to
Washington along with Senator
Kennedy."
Paul Hell, '63, co-chairman of
the campus Young Citizens for
Kennedy drive, says that the
booth outside the gym has signed
up an average of 150 people every

The Homecoming mass meeting
will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
in the League Ballroom.
The various Homecoming acti-
vities and jobs will be described,
Ism Cards
To Identif
'U Students
The IBM receipt cards are the
only University-accepted identifi-
cation cards, the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs has announced.
They will be official for at
least this semester and next. Old
identification cards may be used'
as aids in identification, but only
the receipt cards will be official.
The reason behind the change
is a raft of forgeries of the new-
type cards issued students last
year.
Lost cards may be replaced for
a five-dollar service charge.
Two Scholars
Given Award
Harold Borkin, research asso-
clate, and Prof. Joseph J. Wehrer
of the architecture and design
college have been named joint
winners of a $10,000 prize in the
nationwide competition to design
a Roosevelt Memorial for Wash-
ington, D.C., the Franklin D.
Roosevelt Memorial Commission
announced recently,
Congress appointed the com-
mission in 1955 to consider a way
in which to honor the late Presi-
dent, A site on the lagoon where
the Lincoln and Jefferson Memor-
ials now stand was reserved in
1955.
Prof. Wehrer is now among the
six finalists who may submit plans
for the final stage of the com-
petition. The final Judging will
be made in December, and the
winner will receive an award of
$50,000.

Sday

Anxious to Discuss

atorts Saturday
Bing Crosby-Fabian
"HIGH TIME"

and there will be an opportunity
to sign up for work.
* * 9
The position of Assistant Chair-
man of Woman's Judiciary Coun-
cil is now vacant, Ellen Wein-
berger, '61, interviewing and nom-
inating chairman, announced re-
cently.
Senior women who are interest-
ed should pick up petitions at th.
League undergraduate office. In-
terviewing will be held Sept. 28,
from 3:30 to 5 p.m.
* , ,
Weekly rehearsals of the Ann
Arbor Civic Symphony Orchestra
will begin at 7:15 p.m. tonight in
the Ann Arbor High School In-
strumental Rehearsal Room,
University students and faculty
are invited to join the group by
coming to the rehearsal. Trans-
portation is available through
Ruth Dau or Mrs. James H. Rob-
ertson.
Dr. George C. Wilson, Vice-
President of the Interlochen Na-
tional Music Camp, will direct the
orchestra, which is in its 30th
year. Refreshments will be served
at each rehearsal.
* * 9
The political situation in the
Congo will be the subject of a
panel discussion sponsored by ISA
at 8:00 p.m. Wed, in the multi-
purpose room of the UGLI.
Prof. Henry L. Bretton of the
political science department and
Gilbert Bursley, assistant direc-
tor of the development council,
will lead the discussion.
Prof. Bretton has been in Ni-
geria and Ghana and coordinates
a course on African political af-
fairs. Bursley was the American
consul in the Belgian Congo from
1955 to 1957, where he headed
the United States Information
Agency, operating there and In
central Africa.
Members of the panel include
students from Basutoland, Port
Elizabeth, and Pakistan.
DiAL 8-6416
Feature daily at 6:45-9:05

i

m

Heil and Williams along with
other members of the local chap-
ters have been anxious to discuss
issues with University students
and believe that they have con-
vinced many disappointed Stev-
enson supporters of the necessity
of electing a Democratic Presi-
dent this year.
They say the issues of most
concern to the students are fed-
eral aid to education and enlarge-
ment of the National Defense Ed-
ucation Act and the deletion of
its disclaimer affidavit, both of
which Kennedy supports.
The first meeting of the organi-
zation will be held tonight at the
Union. Heil announced Williams
will attend tonight's meeting, and
Charles Brown, of Kennedy's
staff, will address the rally. "The
primary business of this meeting,"
Heil said, "will be organization
and plans for the campaign."

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE PLAYBILL

Oct. 6, 7, 8
Nov. 3, 4, 5

1960-61
DARKNESS AT NOON . . . Sidney Kingsley
Directed by Jerry Sandler
BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE . John Van Druten
Directed by William Taylor
JOAN OF LORRAINE . . Maxwell Anderson
Directed by Ted Heusel
THE FLOWERING PEACH . . Clifford Odets
Directed by Jerry Sandier

Jan. 12, 13, 14
Feb. 23, 24, 25

Mar. 30, 31 and Apr. 1OUR TOWN . . . . . - Thornton Wilder
4,.Directed by Clarence Stephenson

Regular Season Ticket Prices

$6.00 for Thursday
$7.00 for Friday and Saturday

.-.--.-.-.---.- -- --------------------------i
NAME ADDRESS I
PHONE Please reserve - season tickets for
I Thurs.- Fri. Sat. Amount enclosed
I Pick up at box office or please send -
I Interested in discussing Civic Theatre Membership
Send to-A------ O-- ------------ - ..... - --.---
Send to ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE, P.O. Bo 87, Ann Arbor

[DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
The Daily !Official Bulletin is an The names of those persons who hav
official publication of The Univer- been selected as ushers will appear t
sity of Michigan for which The Michi- this column on Tues. and wed., Sep
gan Daily assumes no editorial respon. 27 and 28. Be sure to consult this lis
sibilitr. Notices should be sent in when you pick up your usher tickets.
TPYEWRITTEN form to Room 3519 Ad-____
ministration' Building, before 2 p.m..Scholarships, Colleges of Litreatur
two days preceding pubiScatio". Science, and the Arts: Applications <
the fall semester 1980 are now avail
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 able In Room 1220 Angell Hall. All ap

ll

I1

General Notices
Special Notice: To all persons who
signed up to become ushers for the
Choral Union and Extra Series Con-
certs and for the Platform Attractions:

presented by
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
,Instruction for Beginners
Dancing for All
Tuesdays at 8 P.M.
Student Activities Building

. .rr
a. . 1

CHORAL UNION SERIES

EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

TEN CONCERTS

FIVE CONCERTS

MARY CURTIS-VERNA

Thurs., Oct. 6

Dramatic soprano of the Metropolitan Opera
makes her Ann Arbor debut.

BOSTON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA . .

. Sat., Oct. 29

CHARLES MUNCH, Muskc Director

VAN CLIBURN

. . . Wed., Nov. 2

America's sensational young pianist.

BRANKO KRSMANOVICH CHORUS
OF YUGOSLAVIA (2:30) Sun., Nov. 6
BOGDAN BABICH conducts this international
prize-winning chorus of eighty voices in its
first tour of America.
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN . Mon., Nov. 14
Veteran world-famous pianist returns for his
tenth Ann Arbor appearance.

JEROME HINtS . . . Mon., Oct. 17
American basso of the Metropolitan and La
Scala Opera Companies, and Bayreuth Wag-
ner Festival.
VAN CLIBURN . . . Mon., Oct. 31
The Ann Arbor debut of America's most
celebrated young pianist.
ROBERT SHAW CHORALE
and ORCHESTRA . . Thurs., Jan. 12
A favorite event in Ann Arbor's rich music
season.
ZINO FRAN2CESCATTI . Tues., Mar. 21
Foremost violinist returns for sixth appear-
ance in Hill Auditorium.
CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA
of AMSTERDAM . . Sun., Apr. 23
EUGEN JocHUM, Conductor
TICKET INFORMATION
CHORAL UNION SERIES
$18.00-Block A. Few remaining un-
claimed seats in the three center sec-
tions of both Main Floor and in First
Balcony, front to rear.
$15.00-Block B. Two side sections on
both Main Floor and in First Balcony,
front to rear.
$12,00-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8
rows.
$10.00-Block D. Top Balcony, rear 13
rows.
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

Meaningful membership
noa
Meaningful organization
means joining the
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation

I

Affiliation -fee:

$3.00 year

SIMPLY MAIL THIS COUPON and
$3.00 to HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.

Name

Local address.

Phone

Parent's name
Home address

city

state

I

WARSAW
PHILHARMONIC

Home congregation

. Wed., Jan. 18

WrroLI RowICKi, Music Director

Sex _______ Class

Age

Affiliation

Married? -

HENRY SZERYNG,
Violinist . . . . . Tues., Feb. 14
"Here is a string virtuoso of consummate
technique and true musical sensitivity."
(Boston Globe.)

Special interests: (drama,

art, etc.)

rc" """-"'"" """tt"'""""""""" """a®"" """""""";
I would also be interested in committee

TOl BE ANNOUNCEDl,~

. ue. Feb. 29

I v P16

G / \#\ i-f V- --8 I tt wir +.

I

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