100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

hrushhev Wants Talks
Wit Ie aUNAsml

UN TALKS BEGIN:
WashingtonCool to Reds

WASHINGTON () - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower said yes-
terday "there seem to be some
trouble makers trying to come toy
our country."
Secretary of State Christian A.
Herter saw no brightening of the
slim prospects that Eisenhower
will get together with Soviet Pre-
mier Nikita S. Khrushchev.
And he discounted . the possi-
bility of serious negotiations at
a big United Nations General
Assembly meeting.
Reaction Cool
These comments just about
summed up first Washington re-
action to the second U.S. visit of
Khrushchev, Washington's No, 1
cold war foe.
U.S. strategists professed little
surprise in Khrushchev's opening

declaration that the Soviets want
peace and desire serious disarma-
ment negotiations among govern-
ment heads at the United Nations.
They said U.S. policy still favors
arms-cut talks in a less unwieldy
form-such as a renewal of the
10-nation east-west Geneva talks
which the Soviets walked out of
last June.
Demanding Concession
And they pictured Eisenhower,
the butt of constant Kremtlin at-
tacks since the summit blowup
last May, as steadfastly resolved
not to meet Khrushchev this time
without noteworthy concessions
from the Soviet boss.
Eisenhower, who goes to New
York Thursday to address .the
General Assembly, made his re-.
mark about trouble makers while

/ CAPABLE and ENTHUSIASTIC
SERVICES ARE NEEDED!
PETITION NOW
for committee chairmanship:'

MEMBERSHIP'
PUBLICATIONS
SUPPER CLUB

INTERFAITH
SERVICE
UJA.

Petitions due by Thurs., Sept. 29
2lnterviews held on Sun., Oct. 2
Hillel offices: 1429 Hill Street
THE B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL POUNDATION

talking to a Republican campaign
group at the White House. Some
reporters understood him to say
"there seem to be some trouble-
makers coming" but an official
text released later made it "try-
ing to come."-I
Ike Asks Calm
The President did not specify
anybody by name and the White
House declined to amplify. Over
the weekend Eisenhower had ap-
pealed to Americans to be calm
reasonable and dignified toward
the UN visitors even though they
may have vilified the United
States,
Herter was interviewed as he
took off for New York for the As-
sembly meeting which starts to-
day. He is to remain there as
head of the U.S. delegation.
Asked whether there was any
improvement in the already-poor
prospects- of an Eisenhower-
Khrushchev get together, Herter
replied: "No, I don't see any"
Herter Not Hopeful
As for the possibility of ser-
ious disarmament negotiations,
the secretary of state referred to
his statement of last week. At that
time he ridiculed the possibility of
serious talks on this complicated
subject among heads of govern-
ment sitting together, as Khrush-
chev would have it.
"I've had my say about serious
negotiations with 82 to 96 heads
of government," he said.
Herter was accompanied to
New York by a plane full of top
advisers including Joseph C. Sat-
terthwaite, assistant secretary for
African affairs; UN-Russian ex-
pert Charles E. Bohlen; and dis-
armament specialist Philip Par-
ley.
U.S. Supportf
Ends Pakistan,
Indian Dispute
KARACHI, Pakistan, (A') -
India and Pakistan, won over by
a United States-supported billion
dollar investment plan, ended
yesterday a dispute as old as their
countries--division of the Indus
river waters.
A treaty formally settling the
13-year-old issue was signed by
Prime Minister Nehru of India,
who arrived here earlier yesterday;
and President Mohammad Ayrub
Khan of Pakistan.
The two leaders expressed con-
fidence the pact will enable them
to clear up other issues between
their nations, including the stub-
born argument over ownership of
the border state of Kashmir. They
will hold 3%/$ days of discussions.
The billion dollar investment
fund will be established under the
treaty by the World Bank and six
member nations -- the United
States, Australia, Canada, West
Germany, New Zealand and Bri-
tain.
The dispute dated back to 1947,
when the two nations won inde-
pendence from Britain and the
boundaries fixed between them cut
through 20 ,million acres in the
arid Junjab district. Pakistan re-
ceived 80 per cent of the irrigated
area but India got the head-
waters of the six rivers of the
Indus system which provide water.
for irrigation.

Begins Stay
W * I
With Speech
In New York
Attacks President,
Herter on Policies
NEW YORK UPl) - Soviet Pre-
mier Nikita S. Khrushchhev in-
dicated yesterday he wants to talk
about disarmament with United
States President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower at the United Nations and

Nixon Sees
.Free Peace
For Eutrope
WASHINGTON, tP' - Republi-
can presidential candidate Rich-
ard M. Nixon declared yesterday
"we can achieve . .. without war"
the goal of freedom for the captive
peoples behind the iron curtain.
The vice-president offered this
hope to a group-some in cos-
tumes of comfmunist - dominated
Poland and Lithuania-organized
to push his candidacy among
foreign-born Americans.
Nixon met with leaders of
American Nationalities for Nixon-
Lodge a few hours before em-
barking on his second big week
of' stump speaking and hand-
shaking.
Heads West
Starting with visits to Wilkes-
Barre and Scranton, Pa., Nixon
was outward bound on a 4,000-
mile swing through the Midwest
and into the deep South. On hi
itinerary are Michigan, Indiana,
Kentucky, Missouri, Illinois, Wis-
consin, South Dakota, Louisiana
and Mississippi.
A high point of this tour will be
an appearance Friday at the na-
tional plowing contest in Sioux
Falls, S.D., where he plans the
second of two major farm policy
speechs. He outlined part of his
farm program in Iowa last week.
Meets Ike
Before leaving for Pennsylvania,
Nixon had a 45-minute meeting
with Eisenhower at the White
House and an aide said they dis-
cussed the'campaign.
Nixon met with his nationalities
committee as Soviet Premier
Nikita S. Khrushchev and other
communist chiefs landed in New
York for the United Nations
General Assembly meeting.
Nixon alluded to aspirations for
the liberation of the satellite
peoples, saying some people bring
up the ill-fated Hungarian revolt
in asking how the subject peoples
can be freed without war.
Laos Rebels
Shell Capital
VIENTIANE, Laos, (') - Troops
loyal to neutralist Premier Sou-
vanna Phouma manned mortars
and set up roadblocks on the out-
skirts of Vientiane last night fol-
lowing a rebel threat to attack
this administrative capital.
Military officials dismissed as
propaganda a declaration by the
opposition regime of Gen. Nosavan
that its forces planned to seize the
city, but said they looked for
another shelling.
A 30-minute machine gun and
mortar barrage early Sunday
damaged a waterworks station and
three homes. The fire came from
across the Mekong river in Thai-
land.
"They (the rebels) are trying to
harass us and scare us out but
they won't succeed," said Gen.
Quane Rathikone, Phouma's army
commander.
CARLOS
MONTOYA
Coming
Friday, October 7th

IL -- - . I

NEW YORK (J--An angry Fi-
del Castro stayed behind a for-
midable police guard yesterday,'
refusing to budge from the hotel'
suite to which he has confined,
himself since his arrival Sunday.
The Cuban prime minister's
wrath came out in an official pro-
test to the United Nations over
the manner in which he said he'
was treated by his American'
guards Sunday upon his arrivalf
from Havana.
Castro is here to address the
United Nations General Assem-
bly which starts tomorrow. The}
airport incident to which the pro-I
test referred was certain to add
fire to the blast Castro is expect-
ed to level at the United States in
the General Assembly.
Reported Displeased
Cuban newsmen said the Cuban
strongman was displeased with
the reception he has received so
far in this city that received him
so enthusiastically on his first vis-
it in April, 1959.
Tempers also were getting
shorter between the C u b a n
strongman's own guards and the
American security forces. This
was in evidence this afternoon
whenanti-Castro forces, small in
number but noisy, made their first
appearance near the hotel.
Protests to UN
Castro protested to the United
Nations yesterday over the "un-
civil and violent" treatment he i

rro. &Caro~
..71ieV4, oii oard

i
r, ,,

ANN ARBOR

HIGH * FRI., OCT. 7-8:30 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED

$3.50 - 2.75--2.25-1.75 (tax nci.)
Tickets on sale at the DISC SHOP, 1210S. Univ.2

LETTER TO UNs:
Castro Protests Police Acti*o:

rvn. c. cranI4

enlorie:

DIVIDEND CHECKS in FLANNELETTE'

said he received from security
guards Sunday upon his arrival.
Castro's protest was delivered
yesterday by Cuba's Ambassador
to the UN, it was revealed at a'
brier press conference at Castro's
hotel headquarters by Raul Roa,Y
Jr., son of the Cuban foreign min-
The letter of protest charged
specifically that the prime min-
ister's armi was pushed when hej
sought to step out of a limousine!
to greet pro-Castro Cubans as-
sembled at the airport. Police

Jacobson's
Are Now
Taking Applications

For Their

U of M
College Board

blocked the Cuban prime m
ister's efforts to leave his cat
Later Castro moved his hC
headquarters to the Negro sect
of New York last night after co
plaining to Hammarskjold ab
the "inhospitable" conditions su
rounding his visit to this city.
Aides said Castro was so ni
he threatened to import ter
from Cuba and pitch them on't
UN grounds as housing forl
delegation. This source claim
the first hotel had said it wo
prefer that Castro get out.

NIKITA S. KHRUSHCHEY
... visits U.S.
thus, in effect, turn the coming
U.N. General Assembly session in-
to a world summit meeting.
The Soviet Premier and his Red
bloc retinue arrived Monday, to
a soggy and coldly hostile New
York welcome. Khrushchev at
once suggested Eisenhower should
attend the Assembly session for
"serious negotiations" on disarma-
ment.
Khrushchev, beginning his se-
cond stay in the United States
with a lecture to Eisenhower,
urged the President to take "really
constructive" part in the Assembly
session and avoid making just a
"fancy speech."
Attacks Herter
The boos and catcalls marking
Khrushchev's arrival at a decrepit
East River pier had hardly died
away before the Soviet leader
launched an attack on Secretary
of State Christian A. Herter.
He said he found "very strange"
Herter's recent statement that
Khrushchev's mission in the
United States would be one of
making propaganda.
Khrushchev said he objected to
Herter saying" that the Soviet
proposal regarding participation
of leading statesmen in the dis-
cussion of the disarmament prob-
lem at the General Assembly is
'completely ridiculous.' " He called
this "a strange sort of logic."
Out of Context
A United States spokesman at
the% United Nations retorted that
Khrushchev had presented the
Secretary's remarks out of context.
He said Herter was not referring
to talks "by leading statesmen"
but to talks by the heads of 82
nations on a matter so complicat-
ed as disarmament.
Thtre was no other American
comment on Khrushchev's ar-
rival remarks except that the
spokesman noted there was noth-
ing unexpected or new in the
Soviet leader's talk. He said a
Eisenhower would make the
United States position perfectly
clear in his Thursday address to
the Assembly.

441
b w
-x/
n k../

They're

Fashion! Miniature checks with
a bonus of blossoms bordering
the hemline . . . brightening
the vo lace edged yoke. Yours
to enjoy in these heavenly
warm, soft flannelette dream-

I

I

I

ers. Pink or blue.

$6.00

certified

Peignoir Gown
Sizes 32-40

Americana

Butcher Boy
Pajama
Sizes 32-40
teen 8-16
junior 7-15

Sleep Coat
Sizes small,
medium, large

I

I

I

Lower Level

11 1
e (/ate

LUu renc

sop

I

THE

8 Nickels Arcade

L

KNIT and WEAR
SHOP

I

220 SOUTH FOURTH AVL

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
7:00 A.M. to 12:00 A.M. Weekdays
9:00 A.M. to 12:00 A.M. Weekends!
I 'ecwdqrl lit PIZZA
;I
CCIQ~lI~g I1

L'
44I
.1

9

1-
A.:.
i
P {~
-.
_ Y
K
k ' ± . . .......

I

I-
Authentic
INDIA
IM ARAS
Dresses
SPECIALLY PRICED
at
REG. $22.95
t Sizes 8 to 16

I

' y :7
//////''' r
4l +i
.
'
\1,
I

I

Small Large
......$ .30 $ .70

Plain

Pepperoni .....
Mushroom .....
Beef ..........
Sausage ......
Bacon .......
Green Pepper,.
Onion.........
Super Deluxe .

.40 .85

.45
.45
.45
.45
.40
.40
.60

.85
.85
.85
.85
.85
.85
1.25

X-Large
$1.25
1.40
1.60
1.60
1.60
1.45
1.45
1.45
2.00

f
i
I
i

I

I

i
t.

1
k
ii
{ +
{

also

t

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan