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January 19, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-01-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Says

U.S.

Economy

ready f or Sound Growth

ST PRESS CONFERENCE:
President UrgesFirmPlc
SHINGTON (A - President
it D. Eisenhower urged the
ing Kennedy administration
day to keep America "strong
irm and yet conciliatory" in
ng the global challenge ofx

The retiring President, in an
miable mood, closed out his
Thite Hbuse news conferences
ith a wide-ranging discussion of
omestic and foreign problems. It
as his 193rd meeting with re-
orters as President and 305 of
hem turned out.
Today Eisenhower will confer
'ith President-elect John F. Ken-
edy to wrap up final details of
he transition from the old Re-
ublican to the new Democratic
dministration. On Friday he will
0 out of office when Kennedy
akes the presidential oath at
oon.
Suggests Amendment
To smooth the way for future
ransitions, Eisenhower yesterday
iggested a constitutional amend-
rent advancing the time of pres-
lential elections and inaugura-
ons. He said the new chief exec-
tive should have 80 days in which,
o organize his administration be-
ore he starts dealing with Con-
ress.
In his farewell appearance in
he ornate Indian Treaty Room
f the old State Department
uilding next to the White House,
|isenhower was nostalgic, reflec-
ive and wryly humorous.
He was also solemnly authori-
ative in outlining what he re-
ards as Kennedy's gravest prob-
em, his own greatest achieve-
aent, and his biggest disappoint-
ient in eight years in the presi-
ency.
'Unreasonable' Attitude
The legacy he reluctantly will

MEETS PRESS--At his last press conference, President Eisenhow-
er charged President-elect John F. Kennedy to maintain a firm
America, but at the same time to keep a conciliatory policy for
the nation. In a report released yesterday, he also expressed his
views on the economic state of the country.
have to leave Kennedy, Eisen- have plunged the world into a dis-
hower said, "the the intransigent, astrous war.
unreasonable attitude" of the His formula, he said, lay in "the
Communist nations. kind of understanding and firm-
To meet this he said not only ness and readiness to take the
the new President but every4ody risk" that prevented a destruc-
else will have to concern them- tive clash with the Communist
selves with "what to do to keep bloc.
ourselves strong and firm and yet
conciliatory in trying to meet .. .
this terrible problem that is none 17171ld News
of our making."
Eisenhower said he believes his
own greatest achievement lies in, Ro ndu
having developed policies that kept
the peace when weakness might
By The Associated Press
OMAHA - The Strategic Air
Command announced yesterday
that United States heavy bombers
now are in the air around the
S clock.
G :a Thnt A- Power- com-

Report Sees'
No Downturn
In Business
Emphasizes Need
For Balanced Budget
WASHINGTON VP) - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower yesterday
painted a rosy picture of the na-
tion's economy and said his ad-
ministration has laid a firm base
for "a period of sound growth."
And Eisenhower placed at the
feet of his successor, President-
elect .John F. Kennedy, the key
role in spurring the growth. With-
out naming Kennedy, the Presi-
dent said the federal policies
needed could, to a considerable
extent, be achieved "administra-
tively and require no legislative
action by Congress."
Eisenhower's annual economic
report-his last big message to
Congress-fisted 14 "important
matters" on which he said Con-
gressional action is needed. Most
of these, however, he has already
called for in one form or another.
Plea for Balance
None of the proposalsi could be
called an anti-recession measure,
such as some economic experts
say are needed to spur the fal-
tering economy. Heading Eisen-1
hower's list was a plea to keep his
new $81 billion federal budget in
balance and keep inflation under;
control.
The whole tone of Eisenhower's
message was opposite to the only
comparable document, a report on
Jan. 5 to Kennedy by his eco-
nomic task force.
That Democratic group recom-
mended swift emergency measures
to combat the business slump, but
cautioned against pushing the
panic button.
Extend Compensation
Among other things it called for
extending unemployment compen-
sation pay, along with other pro-
grams to raise federal outlays by
$3 billion to $5 billion in the year
starting next July 1.
Eisenhower conceded that Con-
gress might supplement jobless
pay in "periods of especially high
rates of unemployment." But
newsmen were told by his eco-
nomic advisers that the present
rate of 6.8 per cent jobless isn't
high enough to justify federal
aid.
The President's message no-
where spoke of a recession, busi-
ness tip or downturn as occur-
ring in the final months of his
administration.
Eisenhower said "economic ac-
tivity continues high as the year
1961 begins, despite declines in
production and employment that
have occurred since the middle of
1960."
Then suggesting ways in which
he expects this trend to be stop-
ped, Eisenhower said:
"Consumer outlays may be ex-
pected to increase as the factors
of expansion raise personal in-
come, and especially if the prices
of consumer goods remain free
from inflationary pressures,
"An increase in general econom-
ic activity should not, according-
ly, be long delayed."

Lumumba
Imprisoned
In Katan ga
JACOTVILLE, The Congo (P) -
Patrice Lumumba was locked upJ
yesterday in this province's most]
secure prison, nursing cuts and'
bruises from a severe beating by
Katanga police.
The Katanga government of
President Moise Tshombe, which
seceded from the Congo during
Lumumba's turbulent term as pre-
mier, announced he was brought
to Katanga because the Thysville'
military camp in the Leopoldville'
area was not secure enough to
prevent his escape.
Troops at Thysville rioted over
pay last Friday and Lumumba
was freed briefly during the con-
fusion.
Apparently shaken by the inci-
dent, Congo President Joseph
Kasavubu ordered him transferred
to Katanga. Tshombe's govern-
ment said Kasavubu issued the
order because "the Thysville pris-
on did not offer sufficient guar-
antees." Kasavubu and Tshombe
have resumed political contacts
since the president dismissed
Lumumba as premier last Sep-
tember.
Swedish United Nations troops,
following orders not to intervene
in Congolese politics, did not stop
the beating administered Lumum-
ba and two political associates on
their arrival from Leopoldville
Tuesday,
Soviet Leader
Asks Reform
In Agriculture
MOSCOW (1P) - So much that
is wrong with Soviet agriculture
has been disclosed in a nine-day
session of the Communist Party's
central committee that stern
measures taken by Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev seem to be the
minimum necessary to whip up
production.
Theft of crops, bribery of manu-
facturers in order to get tractors,
faked harvest reports designed to
hide production failures-all these
have been brought out under bit-
ing questions of Khrushchev at:
the assembly which ended yester-
day.
Khrushchev told farm leaders
and local party officials that pro-
duction in their areas is going to
be the deciding factor as to
whether they stay in power.
"These jobs are not hereditary,"
he warned.
Those who produced well got
kindly words. Those who slacked
off got a public blistering._
High officials and low have
heard Khrushchev's upbraiding in
meetings behind closed doors and
then have seen the whole affair
published in Pravda. With its
many local editions, Pravda blan-
kets the Soviet Union.
The effort to make this coun-
try produce more than the United
States is more than an obsession
with Khrushchev. He is prepared
to make a grand tour to tell Rus-
sian farmers personally how "to
grow more corn, how fat to make
their hogs before butchering and,
above all, howe to fire farm mana-
gers with sloppy records in the
bad seasons of 1959-60.

GROUPS NOT UNITED:
Plot Anti-Castro Reve
By HAL McCLURE
Associated Press staff Writer the organization was completing bas, former treasurer
A few blocks from hustling, a draft of a platform to unite tro revolt.
frene Times Square inthe anti-Castroites. It calls for: The MRP claims it
frenetiheart of Manhattan i the New Establishing a provisional gov- derground army of 20,
Yor hedquarterns one of the ernment to take over when Castro responsible for hundre
York headquarters ofof sabotage a day.
largest and most active anti- topples.g a ay
Prime Ministe Fide 'Castro Reestablishing the constitution" DeVarona also pre
of 1940. tros collapse within VI
groups in the United States. Holding elections within 18 "in view of the econo
Only a small sign proclaiming months. (The provisional presi- sis and growing disco
"Frente Revolucionario Democrat- dent, however, would be barred Whether de Varona
ico" (Democratic Revolutionary from running in those elections.) it cagey in regards. t
Front, or FRD) marks the door
of the organization's inconspicu- Promise Reforms vasionremains to be
ous fourth-floor suite. The declaration also will prom-
But behind the door are the ise that social reforms made by In New York, a de
brains and brawn of a hard driv- the Castro government will /be tenant, Sergio Aparac
ing machine that recruits, collects maintained, although "abuses" group had been recrul
funds and disseminates propa- will be corrected. and that a big force v
ganda to one end only: How do the counter-revolution- up and about ready to
The overthrow of Cuban prime aries plan to dump Castro? ings in Cuba, from"
MinisterFidelCastro's regime, Several groups hold that armed outside the United St
invasion is the answer. Await Invasi
Expect To Act Others believe that Castro's He declined to '
"We are almost ready," one overthrow must originate from where "close to 10,000
FRD ofifcial said Sunday. "We citizens inside Cuba. waiting. preparatory t
expect to be in Cuba beginning Still others think that a com- sion. Presumably, it
next month." bination invasion-homeland in- bean country or islant
In Florida, a small band of surrection will do the trick. nitely not the United
Cubans, and some Americans, Invasion Abandoned Castro has claimed
drill under the warm winter sun- De Varona says he has long said.
reportedly preparing for a Cuban since abandoned the idea of an The Democratic R
invasion, armed Invasion, that the Cuban Front claims to have
At another Caribbean area base, people will do it themselves be- underground fighters:i
supporters claim hundreds, or cause of economic hardships and of Cuban life, includi
maybe thousands are readying for government oppression, and the militia.
the day they will launch the coun- The timetable? "Why do you think1
terrevolution they hope will push De Varona's group and the ganized the militia
Castro into the sea. Revolutionary Movement of the asked. "Because he w
These groups are only a few of People (MRP) both envision ac- the army. But we als
a dozen or so active organizations tion within three months or so. people in the militia."
working to unseat the Cuban Rufo ,Lopez-Fresquet, former Circulates Pub
leader-one way or another. Here- minister of finance under Castro, The Front has bee
in lies the basic weakness of anti- now with the MRP, believes the up to 300,000 copies
Castroism. There is no united sugar harvest will figure promi- ters and other pub
front under which most groups nently in the overthrow. . Spanish each week
can act, osi Groups B Sabotage Paralyzes America from its Mian
ppositionGrosBythe end of March or April ters.
Basically, Castro's opposition most of Cuba's production will be None of the Fl
outside Cuba is divided into three completely paralyzed through sab- would say exactly hos
groups: otage, he says, at a time when ans had been recruite
1) Those comprised of former the maximum amount of money York City alone for its
Castro aides or political leaders will be in circulation because of army.
who helped overthrow former Dic- the harvest. And the people won't "Hundreds," one le
tator Fulgencio Batista. have anything to buy. The FRD says it
2) Groups headed by former Ba- This, he says, "could lead to cruit anyone but C
tista-era officials. spontaneous uprisings," at which Americans or Puerto
3) Cuban refugees, which in- former Castro associates would The new recruits,
cludes disillusioned and. disposses- suddenly appear in Cuba to give ca examinations an
sed businessmen and professional "political guidance." tions into their back
people. The MRP claims to be in con- shipped to an embar
The anti-Castro forces inside tact with 800 to 1,000 anti-Castro in the south. From tl
Cuba run a wide gamut, from the fighters in four sections of Cuba. to the "invasion cam:
Roman Catholic Church to clan- The MRP is headed by Raul Chi- says.
destine cells In the army and mili-
tia, education and labor - and
just plains Jose Cubana.
Back Sabotage
Many United States-based an-T
ti-Castro groups take credit for
the acts of sabotage and bomb-
ings now occurring in Cuba.
Does Batista himself, now living
in exile on the Portuguese island
of Madeira, have a hand in coun-
ter-revolutionary plots?
Informed sources believe not.
Batista, vacationing last week
near Lisbon, recently told news-
men he had not changed his mind
about Castro, whom he called "ob-
sessed by blood and inspired by
Communism."
Batista said Cuba can only be
saved if "anti-Communist Cub-
ans unite and neighboring coun-
tries do not interfere." n -Were 1
Start to Unions-
The Democratic Revolutionary
Front, already comprised of five '/NOW
affiliated groups and seeking/'
more, could be a start toward un-
ion.
Former Cuban Premier Manuel
Antonio de Varona, chief of the
FRD, said in Miami last week that s,,

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uen. 1om11as 0. rw , lll
mander-in-chief of SAC, said the
indoctrination phase of the air-
borne alert training program has
been completed and now all
combat-ready B52 bomber crews
are participating in airborne alert
training missions under realistic
conditions.
MOSCOW - Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev told S. Matsumoto,
general secretary of the Japanese
Socialist party, yesterday that the
Soviet Union will be glad "to
consider re-thinking" about giv-,
ing the islands of Hobomat and
Shikotan back to Japan if she will
take a more neutral stand.
* 5 *
WASHINGTON - The total in-
come of all Americans declined in
November and December for the
first time since the 1959 steel
strike.
The Commerce Department said
yesterday the annual rate of per-
sonal income dropped by $700
million in November and by $2.3
billion in December. The Decem-
ber rate of $406.7 billion compared
with an October peak of $409.7
billion.

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JANUARY.
20
Friday
JANUARY
22
Sunday

I

The Thought of Francis Bacon
and its Persisting Relevance
FULTON H. ANDERSON,
University of Toronto
Francis Bacon on General
Education
,JEISSE H. SHER~A,
Western Reserve University
A Concert of Madrigals and
Elizabethan Songs
WAYNE STATE UNivERSITY MADRIGAL
SINGERS
conducted by: HARRY LANGSFORD

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JANUARY
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On Reading Francis Bacon:
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JOHN M. DORSEY,
University Professor,
Wayne Slate University
Singletons and Multiples in
Scientific Discovery: A Chapter

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