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January 19, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-01-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Malin Predicts Rights Action

Two Freshmen Admit
Forgery of ID Cards

STUDIES 'HEADS OR TAILS':
Prof. Edwards Analyzes 'Gamblin

become more a component of man-
agement, citizen participation and
control of governmental operations
has almost inevitably degenerat-
ed."
Keeping governmental support
out of religion and reducing cen-
sorship in television and radio are
two other frontiers which Malin
predicted would play a large part
in civil liberties fights.
Examine Wire-Tapping
Wire-tapping and other mech-
anical means for catching crimin-
als which are used by the police
are areas which are due to be
examined in the 1960's under the
due process clause of the 14th
Amendment, he said.
"We would, however, be in a
lot better standing with the po-
lice, even though we oppose wire
tapping, if we would support oth-
er methods used by them which
do not threaten the procedural
rights."
A last general idea which Mal-
in examined was that dealing with
"retained rights" of the people.
This area includes the military,
commerce and police powers
which will tend to encroach upon
the rights of civilians.
Complex Grows
"The military-industry com-
plex which has become powerful
because it has a powerful adver-
sary, should not cramp the neces-
sities which are important in oth-
er segments of society.
come a garrison state, we'll have
to see to it that the military does
not operate recklessly at the price
of citizen rights."

William Geis. '64, and Thomas
Keating, '64, fined Tuesday in
Municipal Court on charges of
being disorderly, admitted enter-
ing the South Quadrangle Library
and using the duplicating machine
there to make false identification
cards.
The students and Glen Russell
of Dearborn were arrested early
Tuesday morning after they were
seen drinking on city streets.
Geis and Keating told officers
that they entered the library
through a window on Jan. 11 at
3 a.m. and forged identification
cards.
Both students refused to com-
ment on the incident.
They pleaded guilty to disorderly
conduct and were fined $35 each
by the Municiuap Court.
Russell, also pleading guilty,
was fined $35 by the court for
furnishing intoxicants to minors.
Engineers Elect
Council Officers
The Engineering Council has re-
elected Frederick Hornbacher,
'61E, president and elected Curtis
Fischmach, '63E, vice-president;
Thomas DeJonghe, '62E, corres-
ponding secretary; John Stark,
'61E, recording secretary and Da-
vid Seitz, '62E, treasurer.
The council is composed of one
member from each of the engi-
neering societies of the engineer-
ing college and ten members from
,the college at large.

Ann Arbor police have reported
many complaints from local mer-
chants about the invalidity of
identification cards used by Uni-
versity students.'
List Countries
Band Will Visit
The State Department has an-
nounced the 10 countries on the
itinerary of the University Sym-
phony Band, which will go' on
tour under the sponsorship of the
President's special international
program for cultural presenta-
tions.
The bands is expected to per-
form in the Soviet Union, Poland,
Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey, Iran,
Syria, Lebanon, Rumania and
Egypt.
The band, first such college unit
to make this type of trip, is ex-
pected to spend about two months
in Russia, after which it will ap-
pear at an international trade
fair in Cairo for four days.

By HARRY PERLSTADT
If a coin landed "heads" seven
times in a row, could you predict
on which side it would land after
the next flip?
If you predicted "tails" because
you think the probability of tails
is higher, you are falling into what
is called the gambler's fallacy,
Prof. Ward Edwards of the psy-
chology department explained yes-
terday,. Actually the odds remain
50-50.
Prof. Edwards is currently do-
ing a study of binary prediction
in which the subject is to make
a choice between two alternatives
when the outcome is unknown.
Instead of calling heads or tails,
the subject could have been re-
quired to predict which of the
two light bulbs would flash on.
The lights would have been fixed
so that the left one would flash
70 per cent of the time although
the occurrence of the flashes
would be at random.
Use Poker Chips
In the present experiment, how-
ever, one group was asked to pre-
dict the color of a poker chip
drawn out of a bookbag filled with
red and blue chips. A second group

was asked to predict the color of
the chips which they were told
had been previously arranged, and
a third group was asked to make.
color predictions after being told
that the test administrators would
purposely try to fool them.
He found that the subjects be-
haved the same during the experi-
ment regardless of what they had
been told they were doing, but
that the subjects who had money
at stake did bette'r' than those
who were paid by the hour.
Fallacy Prevails
Prof. Edwards said that the
gambler's fallacy was prevalent in
the beginning of the 1,000 predic-
tions each subject made in the
light bulb experiment. As the test
wore on, the fallacy of predicting
the right light after the left light
had flashed several times in a row
was supplanted by an opposite
fallacy of predicting the left light

after it had flashed severa
in a row.
The present experiment,
is supported by the Air For
fice of Scientific Researc
the Institute for Scienc
Technology, will gather in
tjon on how people make de
and aid in the developmr
systems which will allow pe
perform most efficiently.
To Semninar Toy
On Employmen
Prof. Lee Danielson of I
dustrial Relations departn
the School of Business Ad
tration will lead a semin
"Fundamentals of Moderi
ployment and Selective Mi
at 8:30 a.m. today in the Mi
Union.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

I

C AF E P ROM ET HE AN . .. 508 E. Wi l liam
Gigantic FINAL-RAMA
TWO BIG 90-MINUTE SHOWS
Fri. and Sat. Nite 8:30 & 10:30 P.M.
featuring FOLK SINGERS
AL YOUNG & MIKE SHERKER
plus ANDY ANDERSON at the piano
Reservations phone NO 2-6362 or NO 8-9661
Door charge 75c per person

ROYAL
SADLER'S
BA E TWELES
Special
Engagement
TODAY
ONLY
- -
~ atlastIn brilliant ootar
and on the speotaole
screen ... the Incomparable!
MAROT FONTEYN
dancesITHE RO YACL BALLET
SWAN LAKE, Aet II music by
Pletr Tchalkovsk THE FIREBIRo
Mlusio by gor Stravinsky
ONDINE 4 Mast b
Hans Werner Henze
Filmed in EASTMAN COLOR Continuous
Shows
DIALNO 8-6416 1 olS oc

r

t presents.7
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
"Les Enfants Terribles"
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
"The Prince and The Showgirl"
NOTE: By special request, we are extending our F
season.. Next week, Thursday and Friday, January 26tha
27th, we shall show LILLI, starring Leslie Caron and 2
Ferrar; and on Saturday and Sunday, January 28th and 29
Paul Muni as Zola and JosephSchildkraut as Dreyfus
Academy Award winning THE LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA.

I

A

STARTS
TODAY

TWO OUTSTANDING ENCORE HITS!
. ~
* ~ ~3 EN~ 4U EDMUND PIRIOfM
* Jeui-uI sI4 a..*
0112NEMASCOPE in COLOR .1fMRILo,
ALSO

VAN
JOHNSON

0

I

"B IN
"BRIGADOON"

The Student Prince
at 2:45, 6:20, and 9:55

11

"Brigadoon"
at 1:00, 4:35, and 8:10

EXTRA WEEK BY SPECIAL REQUEST
Sat., Sun., Jan. 28-29 Thurs., Fri., January 26-27
"L LII William Dietere's
(Color) "TH E LIFE OF
with LESLIE CARON, MEL FERRER, EMILE ZOLA"
JEAN-PIERRE AUMONT
ACADEMY AWARD with PAUL MUNI, GLORIA HOLDEN,
Short: Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome" JOSEPH SCH I LDKRAUT
Age d'Or Award, Brussels Film Festival 1958 ACADEMY AWARD - Best film of the year
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 CENTS
S.G.C. CinemarjuId
TONIGHT and Tomorrow at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
JEAN COCTEAU'S THE PRINCE
M A T a. T RAIRI PRN E 4

METRO- GOLDWYN-MAYER presents A EUTERPE PRODUCTION
Once each year, during
Easter school vacation,
ta million kidkcelebrate
the Rites of Spring and
migrate to the land of
the Beach Party, the
17 Beer Bust and agame
known as boy-girl-Bingo.
At this time, local residents
s unite in prayer, chaperones . i
run for their ives and
.'policemen turn in their
badges.-
ere the Boys Are" is the
larious story of how four
made out on their
vacation-and why YOU
have every right to a few
grey hairs. <
So muster your courage,
Sparents,and see "Where the
Boys Are' You might as7
well know what you've long
suspected. And you deserve
a good laughI

One of the most original
and versatile talents of our
time, Jean Cocteau, began his
rise to fame as a 21-year-old
whose counsels impressed the
Diaghilev Circle for whom he
composed several ballet sce-
narios. Indeed, of Parade, the
best known of these, with mu-
sic by Satie and costumes and
sets by Picasso, Lifar has writ-
ten that Cocteau was the true
choreographer rather than the
then inexperienced Massine.
Simultaneously, Cocteau was
promoting the group of youth-
ful composers known as Les
Six, who reacted against im-
pressionist vagueness, and in
his "Le Coq et I'Harlequin"
formulated their creed with
aphoristic brilliance. Plays,
stories, and librettos flowed off
his pen. He illustrated his own
and others' books. Such a var-
ied and propulsive esthetic re-
sponse indicated that sooner or
later the temptation to work
in the cinema would be irresis-
table. The special situation in
France with its cine-clubs and
cineastes, provided the audi-
ence at whom Coctau was aim-
ing his first film, the haunting
and difficult Blood of a Poet.
It did not make its way else-
where-apart from the Fifth
Avenue Playhouse.
Cocteau did not make an-
other film until twelve years
later. While France was occu-
pied, he made L'Eternal Retour
which was not uninfluenced by
its expected "Nordic" public.
After the war, Cocteau was re-
sponsible for the creation of a
spate of films: Beauty and the
Beast, a masterpiece of mood
and decor; the enigmatic Or-
pheus; Ruy Blas; Les Parents
Terribles; The Eagle with Two
Heads; and the film we shall be
showing this Thursday and Fri-
day, Les Enfants Terribles.
From the standpoint of con-
tent, these films have nothing
in common, but each is shaped
by the style of the creator, a
blend of romantic feeling disci-
plined by dry irony. The ingre-
dients are there in varying pro-
portions, from the effulgent
Ruy Blas to the astringent Par-
ents Terribles. Asan artist,
working in leisure and with no
extra-human doctrines to set
forth, Cocteau has stamped
these films with his own image.
His is a personality caught be-
tween decay and affirmation.
He is fascinated by contrasts
and rescued by his sense of
polarity between two impossible
voids. In prose, Cocteau is of
necessity aphoristic. There are
those who feel that his film
creations are his most expand-
ed and most important work.
Les Enfants Terribles-rather
weirdly Englished as The
Strange Ones - recounts the
story of a brother and sister

rangement Bach made from a
B minor concerto for 4 violins
to an A minor for four claviers,
which are here heard on four
pianos. Whether you love ok
hate your brothers and sisters
-or have none - the film is
compelling but not instructive.
In The Prince and The Show-
girl, our feature Saturday and
Sunday, Sir Laurence Olivier,
again producing, directing, and
acting, again plays the Prince
but this time to Marilyn Mon-
roe's Ofeelya. Incongruous?
Well, it is difficult to imagine
"Oh Gosh!" being delivered
"trippingly on the _tongue."
Miss Monroe says this is pre-
cisely why the movie is so fas-
cinating: "I know I would go
to see a movie starring Sir
Laurence Olivier and Marilyn
Monroe ... the casting is so-
how do you say it-incongru-
ous." Commenting on the fact
that MGM had wanted to do
the film with Charles Boyer and
Grace Kelly as its stars, Miss
Monroe adds "I thought of do-
ing it myself, but only if .I
could play opposite somebody
really incongruous, someone
like Larry. I mean, there'ssuch
a difference in our! back-'
grounds."
Though it'is not Miss Mon-
roe's background which usually
draws attention, she got her
wish and we, consequently, have
a colorfulsophisticated farce on
royal intrigue - political and
amorous. The story, which is
taken from Terence Rattigan's
London hit "The Sleepless
Prince," involves the Regent of
a mythical state (Olivier) who
is in London for George V's
coronation. Arrogant, mon-
ocles and with a pinch of lech-
ery in his royal makeup, the
Prince arranges to have an
American chorus girl brought
to his rooms for a midnight
snack. But the feather-brained
and stout-hearted girl who ar-
rives falls in love with him and
even attempts to heal the poli-
tical breach between the Re-
gent and his teen-age son who
wants a motorcycle and a gen-
eral election.
In the last few years, Miss
Monroe has become the center
of a minor controversy. On one
side, there are those who feel
she possesses a fine comic tal-
ent, and on the other, those
who feel her comic abilities are
overrated. However, Sir Lau-
rence Olivier said "Her per-
formance turned out quite a
surprise to me . . . She sur-
passed everything I asked of
her. She is a very good actress
and fun to work with."Indeed,
it also appears that under Sir
Laurence's graceful and witty
direction Miss Monroe was able
to substitute skill for silhouette

starring
DOLORES HART - GEORGE HAMILTON\
YVETTE MIMIEUX - JIM HUTTON
RARRARA NiCHOIS PAULA PRENJISS

II

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