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September 16, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDA

7C Plans Summer Reading Seminar

limit the size of groups, those who
are enrolled in the program willj
be given first consideration.
All pertinent information con-
cerning the summer reading pro-
gram, including reading lists of
the required primary books and
optional secondary books along
with the dates and times of sem-
inar meetings may be obtained at
the table in the lobby of the
Undergraduate Library.
The freshmen enrolled in the
program will receive a letter con-
cerning it within the next week,
and the first meetings of these
groups will be held during the
second week of the semester.
Freshmen Discussions
The faculty for the freshmen
discussions are Prof. Paul Henle
of the philosphy department;
Prof. John Mersereau of the Slavic
languages department; Prof.
James H. Meisel of the political
science department.
All freshmen who have read
the books are welcome toattend
the seminars, and reply slips for
the letters sent out during the
summer concerning the program'
may still be returned.

'Challenge'
A nuounces
Scheduling
Program Includes
Taylor, Blanshard
By LINDA REISTMAN
Four prominent men actively
involved on the American scene
are scheduled to speak as part of
this semester's "Challenge of
American Civil Liberties."
The list of speakers includes
Harold Taylor, President Emeri-
tus of Sarah Lawrence College,
September 22; Paul Blanshard,
author of "American Freedom and
Catholic Power," October 10; Nor-;
man Thomas, prominent Ameri-
can Socialist. November 10; and a
colloquim to be led by Henry
Steele Commager, Professor ofI
History and American Studies at
Amherst College, from November
18-20.
Two or three other speakers'
will be announced.
Final preparations are being
completed for seminar and dis-
cussion groups to be led by Uni-
versity faculty and outside guests.
There are over 70 volunteers to
lead these discussion groups which
will be held at residence halls,
fraternities, sororities, and church
groups.
A bibliography on civil liberties
has been prepared by the Under-
graduate Library. It consists of
100 books and articles to be held
on reserve on the various topics
to be discussed.
The brief outline of topics which'
was prepared by the topic commit-
tee and voted upon during the
spring has been expanded to in-
clude the civil liberties' problems
such as freedom of speech and
religion, censorship, due process
of law, academic freedom, and
the rights of labor union mem-
bers.
."Challenge challenges all of the
University's student population to
explore our country's problems
headon," publicity chairman, Jef-
frey Rubenstein, '63, said. "We
want all interested students to
be held at 4:15 p.m. Sept. 22.

ASTRONAUT PROJECT:
'U' Aircraft Lab Studies
Space Travel Problems

:

}

First Organized

The Reading and Discussion
was first organized three years
ago and over 500 students partici-
pated last year, when the seminars
ranged in subject from "Darwin
and Culture" to "Journalism and
its Social Relations."
The first year the program was
an interdisciplinary study called
"Pulsebeat of the Twenties."
Faculty participants in the past
have included Prof. Marston Bates
of the zoology department; Prof.
George Peek of the political
science department; Prof. Ken-
neth Boulding of the economics
department; Prof. Carl Lindstrom
of the journalism department and
Prof. Sidney Fine of the history
department.
The SGC Reading and Discus-
sion Program enters its third year
with this semester's offerings.
Programs are offered both over
the summer and between the fall
and spring semesters.

By PETER STEINBERGER
Motion sickness and the effects
of weightlessness, both major pro-
blems for future astronauts, are
now being studied at the Aircraft
Propulsion Laboratory on North
Campus.
Kent Gillingham, '83M, working
with Dr. Brian F. McCabe of the
department of otolaryngology,
believes th a t by subjecting
animals (and later, people) to
repeated acceleration, he will
cause them to suppress all nerve
impulses leading to motion sick-
ness whenever they feel a change
in velocity.
The project, to be backed by the
Air Force, the Army's Office of
the Surgeon General, the Navy
and National Aeronautics and
Space Administration, is part of
the medical school's new Special
Studies Program.
For the past ' three years Dr.
McCabe has investigated the resis-
tance of figure skaters to motion
sickness, in an effort to find a
means of curing Meniere's disease
(whose symptoms approximate
those of motion sickness).
The present project, which
began this summer, Is now in-
volved in the construction of
'AARD' (Animal Axial Rotation
Device). Scheduled for completion
late this fall, AARD will rotate
dogs and other small animals at
varying speeds and accelerations,
and electric shocks will be given
to the animals when they begin
to show signs of sickness.
By these techniques Gillingham
hopes to cause 'suppression' of
nausea in the animals, and to
determine the maximum safe ac-
celerations to which humans can
be exposed in similar equipment.
New U' Policy
Hits Housing
Discriminationi
(Continued from Page 2)
portunities of interracial, inter-
ethnic contacts.
"Therefore, the University, in
its obligation to serve the best
interests of students, cannot con-
done off-campus housing practice
inconsistent with these University
policies."
Explaining its decision to omit
landlords of one or two tenants
from the regulation, the commit-
tee pointed to "The distinction
between the normal, relatively im-
personal landlord-tenant relation-
ship and the rather intimate re-
lationship which arises when a
householder takes two or less stu-
dents into his home.

'HARD' (Human Axial Rotation
Device), which will be built in
1962, based on data obtained from
the smaller machine, will be used
to suppress motion sickness in
volunteers and later, if successful,
in pilots and astronauts. A pilot
thus conditioned would not be-
come sick as a result of weight-
lessness or rapid changes in accel-
eration.
Both Gillingham and McCabe
have, experienced weightlessness
during a series of 17 Air Force
flights, each of which gave them
a 15 second trip free from gravity.
'Madnes' Set
To End Week
Of Orientation
Orientation week will end to-
morrow night with Union Mad-
ness.
Union Madness is almost a com-
plete fair and is entirely free.
There will be a jazz concert,
gambling, dancing, and movies.
At 7:30' p.m., Union Madness
will open with a Jass concert on
the front steps of the Union.
After the concert ends, every-
one will be invited inside for
gambling, where it will be possible
to lose a fortune in poker chips.
At 9:00 p.m., dancing will begin
in the main ballroom, to the music
of a dance band.
All through the night movies
and cartoons will be shown on
the third floor.
Refreshments will be served.

Union Asks
Lower Fees
To Children
(Continued from Page 1)
low, with some workers at the
Union receiving only 65,cents per
hour and no tips."
Commenting on a speech here
by Charles Wilderspin of a na-
tional union of government em-
ployes at all levels in which the
large turnover of labor at the Uni-
versity was cited as one cause of
the University's high operating
costs, Rice said:
"If the administration works
with us, we will show them how
to stop the terrific turnover of
labor at the University which will
save a lot of money.
"We know that we can save the
state money on labor turnover
and grievance procedure because
we have already done it," Rice
said.
Mentioning a four-stage griev-
ance procedure for employes
which was established at Univer-
sity Hospital this week, Rice said
that the union could save money
for the state by settlement of
grievances at the local level, and
that it would be more peaceful
in addition.
The Local's new office will be
in two rooms at 400 E. Liberty
St., and the Local's secretary-
treasurer will be on duty there
throughout the day, a local union
official said.
DIAL 8-6416
* Ending Saturday *

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INSURANCE:
SGCH ealth Plan Costs
To Increase This Year

ENTERTAINMENT
FRI. & SAT-9 P.M.-2 A.M.
Sunday - Jazz
8:30-11:30 P.M.

DARRYL F. ZANUCK'S
CRACK IN
THE MIRROR

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75c door charge

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By RUTH EVENHUIS
The price of the Student Gov-
ernment Council sponsored stu-
dent health insurance has risen
from $20 to $23 this year.
The raise is accompanied by
changes in the contract. Room
and board payments for hospitali-
zation per day have been increas-
ed, although the payments will
now cover 30 days rather than the
former 120.
However, Harold G. Hall, man-
ager of the accident and health
department of the Detroit insur-
ance angency offering the policy,
pointed out that the national
average length of hospitalization
is seven and one half days and
the University's average six and
one half.
Another change in contract re-
duces payment for mniscellaneous
hospital expenses.
Explaining the increase in price,
Hall pointed out that "the
company has paid out so many
claims above the collected prem-
iums that a slight modification of
contract and premium was neces-
sary."
He added that the policy's wide
coverage and low premium has
resulted in company losses, but
that every effort is being made to
continue the service at the lowest
price financially possible.
Dick Q'sell, 63E, in charge of

the insurance for SGC, emphasiz-
ed that "for the money, this policy
offers the most extensive cover-
age of any university insurance
program."
Oct. 10 is the deadline for in-
surance application.

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