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September 13, 1960 - Image 123

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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it

J J

Tunisia: Blend of
France and Orient

By DAVID ERRERA
EAST BECOMES WEST, for in
Tunisia, land of perpetual
sunshine and waving palms against
blue skies, one may literally find a
satisfying blend of the oriental
exotic, combined with a truly
French flavor.
Just a few flying hours from any
European capital gives the tourist
a chance to see many unbelievably
interesting things. For Tunisia will
enthrall the visitor with its ar-
chaeological relics represting pre-
historic times through the Car-
thaginian period, followed by the
Roman and Byzantine, on through
the Islamic, Judaic and Christian
periods of history,
ARCHAEOLOGICAL sites, with
tir almosta nfantastically
priceless relics remain as they
were found, with very many of
these objects transferred to nearby
museums.
Remains, in ceramics, bronze,
glassware, coins of gold with
statues of terracotta, jewels, in-
cense, sarcophagi and baptisteries,
may be viewed, along with a won-
derfully varied assortment of other
pieces of past histories.
The permanent underearth re-
searches of Mahdi and Cap Bon,
led to discoveries of other priceless
objects. Here are Roman villas,
fortifications, ramparts, aqueducts,
bridges, amphitheatres, tombs and
basilicas, fortresses and memories
of great civilizations gone past, yet
unforgotten in this land that holds
them fast.
HE SPORTSMAN will be happy
to discover many types of game
and can hunt the gazelle in the
mountains, while hare and par-
tridges are the main sport found
in Tunisia.
He may hunt the woodcock in

November to December or ducks,
which are very numerous, in winter
along the lakes. In the remote
parts of the small rivers, turtle
doves are found and also there are
quail that arrive in the spring.
All classical and regional meth-
ods of fishing are included in the
sport and bass, gilt-heads, lichen
and mullets with umbrines, skates,
mackerel and others are numbered
along with the large tuna for those
who like something more exciting.
This truly, is the veritable paradise
of the skin-diver and leaves noth-
ing whatever to be desired in this
respect.
THE LONG coastrlines which
sweep around for miles here
lend opportunity to make moon-
light drives and one may stop at
many a night club along the way
and listen to American swing
played by oriental orchestras.
Exotic eastern dances capture
the imagination too, and in this
compelling and fascinating atmos-
phere, one may lose all sense of
time and personal care. The
strange music wails on and on and
the characters one meets here
could very well be taken from some
scene associated with the Kasbah
not too far away in Algeria.
Modern automobiles, taxis, bus-
ses and trains expedite visits to
the interior of the country and
many tourist organizations con-
trolled by Syndicat d'Initiative
give full information and advice to
visitors. This, incidentally, is the
headquarters of tourism for Tu-
nista.
"Drive Yourself" automobiles
are on hand too and may be ar-
ranged for hire through three
companies, namely Air France,
which caters to its own customers
or the Palace Garage and Tunisi-
enne Automobile.

fIousing Is Not Living
13y JEAN SPENCER
HOUSIGC-University, off-cam- viously. That would be as much as campus housing
pus or affiliated - offers the to accept the University as arbiter legend of the grueli
student opportunities as it im- of morality, which contradicts all just that-applicati
poses limitations. But it poses an tenets of liberal education and mission or denial i
inevitable problem of definition to academic (or individual) freedom. efficient and impe
every student: what part is his Pragmatically, they can be more work. On the other]
living unit to play in his Univer- or less justified as health measures versity is careful t
sity experience? .-assuming a) that women need individual nature of
At first glance, the University more sleep than men and go to But coeds must
dormitory system in which all en- bed as soon as they are within the men really that mu
tering students are expected to dorm, or b) that if women go to trusted than we? R
live offers opportunity chiefly to bed at midnight, men will come in terpret the rule soci
men, and imposes limitations soon after for their rest. ministrators sidestel
chiefly on women. The evils that may beset wom- The freshman e

requests. The
ng interview is
ons and per-
s a matter of
ersonal paper
hand, the Uni-
to respect the
each request.
wonder. Are
ch more to be
ather than in-
iologically, ad-
p.
xperience with

Men have no hours; they also'
have the option of off - campus
housing after their first year on
campus as an alternative to either'
fraternity or more dormitory.
Women have hours; they must
provide adequate and just cause'
when they seek to live in apart-'
ments-usually economic or emo-
tional instability.
MOST STUDENTS' accept the
housing regulations with fresh-'
man curiosity fading into sopho-
more stoicism. They are among
the concessions in the area of per-
sonal freedom which the Univer-
sity has the right to exact.
For the student who questions
whether the University should be
making this sort of regulation-
how this is reconciled with the in-
stitution's aims of intellectual de-
velopment - there are various
answers, some less satisfactory
than others.
Dormitory living can be an in-
formal contributor to the educa-
tion of those who participate.;
President Alexander Ruthven, in
announcing the birth of the Michi-
gan House Plan for residence halls,
wrote: ,
OPHE BOARD of Regents has in-
sisted . . that the houses
should be more than mere room-
ing and boarding houses. They
recognize that, broadly conceived,
education should include both
formal instruction in the business
of living and informal training in
the enrichment of personality. A
Michigan House Plan has been
developed which will give the stu-
dent experience in communal liv-
ing and assistance in expanding
his education into those areas
which must be cultivated if he is
to become a citizen of the world."
Whether these benefits - the-
oretical and practical - warrant
a rule that they be included for
each and every student is open to
question, of course.
I[E EUNIVERSITY'S distinction
between men and women can-
not be ethically construed, ob-

en in apartments would seem to
depreciate after she is 22 and a
graduate student. It has been
pointed out in the past that the
18-year-old white collar girl work-
ing in Ann Arbor is deemed more
capable and responsible than a
coed coeval.
CONTRARY TO established
myth, the Dean of Women's
office is generally considerate and
conscientious in handling of off-

the dormitory is fairly general.
The conviviality of living away
from home environments, possibly
for the first time, is natural. As
the year progresses, institution
quarters, food, time schedule and
social life grate on the sensitive.
The bare expedience which
limns administrative policy in the
dormitory routine is indifferent to
the individual and forces con-
formity. Turning away from this,
Continued on Page Nine

COUNTRY CALM--Twisting sun:
quiet of Ann Arbor's near suburbi
quility to the cosmopolitan golf co
patina of country elegance to the
ing lawns and gracious facades it

. ...r pi .rrw.r rmr .rr wuwr w+r w.. .rr... .rn ..s

WANTED!
Freshman Clipping
Mw 4eit &z~er £A 'p
T1V -C

ISLAND PARK-Picnickers from the town or the University find
the banks of the Huron inviting in spring, summer and fall.
No longer as isolated and rural as formerly, the park still draws
many to have outdoor meals and sing around a fire far into the
crisp evening.

THE UGLI--Stepsister to the library system, the Undergraduate Library was finished two years
ago. The director of the library system says he's heard it referred to as "Disneyland" or "Fountaine-
bleaux," but the UGLI was designed to meet the special needs of the undergraduate, and to judge
by attendance is doing its job well.
ibrari&nes Serve

I .Y - -.M
Basement of Michigan Pharmacy

727 N. University

for
Records
DISC SHOP
1210 S. University NO03-6922

WELCOME TO THE CLASS OF 1964
AND ALL FORMER STUDENTS

Continued from Page rive
from part of the money gained by
last spring's tuition boost.
Prof. Wagman says some of the
system's budget increase will go
to complete the shelving at its

North Campus storage center for
less frequently used books. When
this is completed, Prof. Wagman
will be able to have about 30,000
books per year transferred into
storage to make room for a com-
parable number of new acquisi-

VISIT US5 FOR ALL YOUR

NEEDED ACCESSORIES

L1II

0 DRESSER SCARFS

'I1*11

1

R BATES BEDSPREADS & DRAPES
} LAUNDRY AND ShOE BAGS

* BLANKETS

tions by the General Library. The
stacks are now filled to optimum
capacity, he asserted; without the
new storage facilities, the library
would have to return to piling
books on the floors.
A8 TO long-range plans, Prof.
Wagman says the system "will
attempt to remain as flexible as
possible," and to continue "to
provide comprehensive collections
to support research in all fields
of interest here." He has some
ideas for consolidation of branch-
es and improvement of service
areas in the General Library -
added carrels, a document center
-but at present these are only in
the speculative stage.
On the whole, Prof. Wagman
says, "the same pressures are on
libraries as on the University."
Particularly important are chang-
ing emphases on research in
teaching,
Prof. Wagman did not add, as
he nign nave,tn at a good library
system is a necessary adjunct to
both,
Records
DISC SHOP
1210 S. University NO 3-6922

N E~
, ry.

li

i

jean Spencer is this year's
Daily Editorial Director.

OPEN EVENINGS

r ILI_____ _ ____'

I

The
KNIT and Wear SHOP
Great Variety of
Domestic and Imported
YARN

0 SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES

THE LAMP POST is a luxurious motel of
heated pool. Each of the 54 rooms is fi
wall carpeting, complimentary TV, bac
individually controlled heating and air-c
tronically controlled message and morni:
Located near University of Michigan cam

# BATH TOWELS

* SMALL THROW RUGS

The GOLDEN APPLES

Bestaurat . 4

We AlsoH ave Wonderful Gift Items

Knitting Accessories, Books
Embroidery, Crochet Cotton
Also for fall everything
in fancy and bulky sweaters

Member of Quality Co

WIIE R E QUALITY HAS NO SUBSTITUTE"
GAGE LINEN SHOP

features for your enjoyment
CICKE N * STEAK *SEAFOOD
SMORGASBORD
also BUFFET LUNCHEONS 1 1 A.M.-2 P.M.
ALL YOU CAN EAT for $1.04
TOWER HOTEL
m~ w , TE-,..,.

IMMEDIATELY ADJACENT TO HO'

<0 t

THE

11 NICKELS ARCADE
urs Daily: 9:00 to 5:30

KNIT and WEAR

2424 E. Stadium Boulevard at Wa
Ann Arbor, Michigan

DSOUT

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