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September 13, 1960 - Image 124

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a

Library System Fills Multiple

FROM THE RIDICULOUS-The relative success of the study date
presumably depends on which part of the seemingly contradictory
term receives most emphasis. The Undergraduate Library is pop-1
ular with couples striving to perfect the union of complementary
activities.
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By PHILIP SHERMAN 'lem has for the most part been with open stacks, and recently the
solved. General Library opened its stacks
LIKE the University it serves, Librarians decided students like on the theory that it is often eas-
the library system is already to study to music when the facili- er to find books by browsing than
hugethreatening expansion, by reading catalogue cards.
-rties of the UGLI's audio room, The UGLI especially stresses its
Ranging from the neo-classical needed for course use, were con- role as a "training library" for
elegance of the Clements Library sistently overtaxed. Speakers were students who will probably be us-
building to the spare functionality installed on the second floor, and ing libraries for future research,
of the Undergraduate Library, the scheduled programs of classical and goes out o fits way to encour-
34 branches of the library sys- music for Sunday afternoons and age- students to ask assistance
tem house well over 2.5 million Wednesday evenings began to cre- from the reference librarians on
ate a high-brow Muzak effect. i duty.
Best-known to undergraduate The program has been a success.
students are the Undergrad or HERE HAS BEEN some justi-
UGLI, the system's most popular CARRYING OUT the service ob- fled criticism o fthe UGLI on
library, and the General Library, , jective, the UGLI was built two grounds: it serves as a center
center of the system. They may
also have occasion to use some of
the specialized divisional libraries,
such as the natural science, fineF
arts and education libraries.
TERMS of books handled,
figure about as important to
librarians as profit margins to1
businessmen, the UGLI is therm
brar system's star performer.a
Opened in 1958, it caters directly
to the needs of the undergraduate.
Its collection of 70,000-plus books
was gathered specifically to meet IF
these needs, and its staff is thor-
oughly inured to solving the study,
and researc hproblems of under- '
graduates. .
As a result of this planning, the
UGLI's book-use total for the year
ending last April has been about'
650,000, including both home cir-
culation and building use of books.
This figure should probably be
even larger, system director Prof.
Frederick H. Wagman says, since
the building use figure is a mini-
mum based on the number of
books the staff reshelved during
the year. Actually, a book taken
fromt he shelf may be used sev-
eral times before it is reshelved, or
the user may replace it himself.
Total UGLI attendance of over
1.5 million students for the same .
period is another indication that
the library is meeting the needs it
was designed to fill.

Open Persuaders?
By JUDITH DONER entertainment than it could have
H lIDDEN persuasion, bah ever wished for-and for free.
For each example of hidden FURTHER, if the American pub-
persuasion detected in modern lic had the sufficient good taste
commercials, there are thousands to watch only the programs which
of open persuasions used every were artistically defensible, then
day, the mediocre things might be
Spotlighting little bits of hiddenforcedo e air.
persuasion, such as made Vance Yet, it is difficult to say that it
Packard famous, is not representa- is wrong for people to sit and
tive of the advertising business at watch bad programs and hope for
all. something finer. Here are millions
of television viewers who never
These views were expressed by had it so good, who think they
the president of a leading Detroit should have it better. What Amen-
advertising agency, when asked to can can blame them?
meet the charges of "The Hidden cTnsdn't meaem.
Persades,"as h prgresed This doesn't mean that adver-
Persuadersas hethe tisers and broadcasting companies
through a defense of the adveris- aren't responsible, but they have
ing profession. only the same responsibility as
Advertising is almost 100 per the creators of bad architecture,
cent salesmanship. How could it painting or music have. They are4
be very secretive? People hate to all at fault in that they are playing
be tricked into anything, particu- down to too low a denominator of
larly into buying anything. public taste.
Yet, there is a social conscious-
JT IS TRUE that if you need a ness among a large number of ad-
new pair of shoes, you won't put vertisers and their agencies. By
up a big fuss about going out and evolution and by the gradual
buying them. But you don't want recognition that something a little
to be sold the fact that you need bit better will be appreciated just+
a new pair of shoes by some grin- that much more, they too can im-
ning, smooth - haired television prove television viewing.
salesman. You will automatically
rebel. IT WILL NOT BE long until al-
This same characteristic prevails most all major advertising cam-
when the lady of the house sends paigns will have been pre-tested
down her children or maid to tell before they are put on a nation-
the door to door salesman "she wide basis, according to many ad-
doesn't want any." Or, if forced vertising men. When this occurs,
to answer the door herself, she is advertisers may be willing to spend
sorely tempted to slam it . . . and the sum which they won't spend
often does. now to bring better programs to
So the television salesman uses the air,
a puppet or a cartoon to intrigue Certainly, if you were giving al
the viewers into watching the ad- uales talk which you knew would
vertisement instead of running to work, you'd have a lot more con-
the kitchen between acts. And the lidence to go out and knock on the
door-to-door salesman hands the next door.. .
lady a free sample of hand cream And this is what advertising in-
to at least keep the door open volves--a new door every house, at
long enough to give her an idea new commercial every fifteen min-
what he is selling. utes, a new contest every day. The
Each of these is a gimmick, an man in advertising is not onlyI
attention - getter. And there are competing with other agencies, but

FAMiLIAR YET UNKNOWN-Only perhaps the nurses and medical
arity sometimes breeds content more insidious to their professions tha
the maze of colored lines to the uttermost depths of University Hosp
hill, its mysteries are open to those who wish to tour it.
Housing Is Not

continued from Page Three
freshmen hail rush and the year's
end as a taste of freedom.
BUT WHEREVER the sophomore
lives - in the dorm, in af-
filiated housing, in an apartment
-he faces a fundamental ques-
tion. Or he refuses to face it, from
disinterest or ignorance.
The four-year routine of college
can be terrifically narrowing. A
full program of studies can well
be looked on as a full-time job.
Unless the individual actively looks
for more than a scholastic life,
his time and energy may be chan-
neled into one area-pursuance of
academic aims.
IT IS NOT always easy to realize
that the four walls of a dormi-
tory, a fraternity or an apartment
where a student sleeps don't en-
close a world. They are not even
a home. The student who forms
" binding ties to any kind of living
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unit in the University community
is placing unhealthy, artificial
limitations on his experience -
the total learning experience col-
lege ought to be.
The difficulty of this realiza-
tion is in the things that it does
not mean. To say that a housing
unit isn't a home is not to say
that attachments of friendship
may not grow out of the associa-
tions found there, or that these
associations are artificial.
But even in a fraternity or
sorority, the group who share the
living unit are far from homo-
geneous, and this is a virtue. After
all, at college the student lives
away from home; housing ar-
rangements are to a degree arbi-
trary, for they are not natural,
HIS ASSOCIATIONS with others
should be directed toward an
S-

HE IDEAL of service to the
student which the adminis-
trative attitude of the UGLI seems
to reflect is found throughout the
library system.
When students were piling tables
with open books to save them
through meal hours, or for late-
arriving friends, the UGLI's work-
ers were instructed to close the
books, leaving pink slips explain-
ing that use of such "silent sav-
ers" was unfair to other students
and therefore forbidden. The prob-

many other forms. But none of
them can, by any stretch of the
imagination, be called hidden per-
suaders.

on behalf of each client he is vying
with their competitors to get the
sales.I
Advertising is the quintessence
of American competition.

I

MUSIC SEI

TO THE SUBLIME-These neo-Classic portals could hardly har-
bor the comparatively undignified goings-on usually associated
with the Mary Markley concourse at closing hours. The Clements
Library, unpretentious but pristine, speaks for itself.
14

You expect More
and you

from STANDARD
GET IT!

{

Philip Sherman is a
in the literary college
Daily Night Editor.

junior
and a

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IN FACT, there is no need to be
sneaky about making a com- Ju
mercial a pleasant thing to watch.I the I
When a break comes in a televi- year's
sion show, the American public tor.
knows that it is seeing an adver-
tisement, no matter how intrig- -
ingly and cleverly put on.
They are merely methods to
achieving the art of advertising
the art of ingratiating yourself
in order to sell a prospect.
Advertising is also an art be-
cause it encompasses the fields of
art, music and literature. It is
part of the particular fascination
of advertising that some of the
best talent in all of these areas is
enlisted.
And the fact that radio and tele-
vision are fundamentally "show
business" allies the advertising
which appears on these two media
forms with the personalities and"
spectacle of that particular world.
One should not give full ear to
the general public's criticism of
advertising today. People watch
television so often that they are
tremendously aware of each spot
commercial and the irritation it
may be causing them.
But it can't be denied that the
millions of dollars which adver-
tisers are spending on television
today allow the public to see finer

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