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September 13, 1960 - Image 122

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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A Graduate's Advice for

New Students

A GRADUATE'S ADVICE

By ROBERT JUNKER
ONE LOOK at the University's
campus should be sufficient to,
tell any perceptive person that this
could not be the reason that stu-
dents and faculty members come
to the University. And yet it is
true that many students iever see
much more of Ann Arbor than the
ugly misplaced structures which
the University calls its own.
True. many dorm-disillusioned
sophomores travel "the town"
apartment hunting, but unless,
they are wealthy, this tour never
takes them out of the city's slum
section. An occasional brave stu-
dent will disregard social mores
and go downtown (i.e. Main
Street) to do some shopping. And
most seniors get at least as far:
west of the campus as the Pretzel
Bell.
B UT BY AND large, students
never see the town that sur-
rounds them. Ann Arbor is not a
bad town at all-in many ways it
is delightful and unusual, and can
add immeasurably to the four year
ritual.
Ann Arbor is a rural oasis, or
at least until the end of World
War II it was. Most of the towns-
people think it is. The growth of
the University has brought in
large numbers of faculty members
from all over the country, but the
town itself remains largely unl-
sophisticated. Year after year it
votes reactionary Republican (and
believes it).
When Samuel Eldersveld won
the mayoralty contest three years
ago, the time for a change was

Continued from Page Two
THE TOWN proper is a delight.
Many of the houses are old, on
wide, tree-shaded streets. Some of
them, like the Wahr house, on
Division Street, are classic. The'
hills and trees, once you get half
a dozen blocks from campus,
make quiet Ann Arbor a really
beautiful town.
The traditions of the city go
far back, despite all the recent
immigration. The Pretzel Bell is
still the classic drinking establish-
ment, with pictures of University
athletic teams dating back 50
years lining the walls. And of
course the Bell itself is still rung
on special occasions, like birthdays
of the clientele.
Walk down town a bit further
and drop into Metzger's. Here the
waitresses still speak German (or
most of them). Since Ann Arbor
was originally a German settle-
ment, this bit of the past has been
nicely if rather commercially, re-
served. The wilder student ele-
ment take their thrills in the ex-
citing deer-horn-studded Old Ger-
man, the last of the "big three"
drinking establishments-
YOU MIGHT be wondering, what
does one do in-this rural small
town for excitement? There is the

usual (three movie houses cater
to the sedentary, for example) and
there is the unusual, like the ex-
pressway, which can carry you
into Detroit where things are even
duller.
The athletic may want to go
canoeing. This ancient Indian
discipline is within walking dis-
tance if you're hardy. A three mile
course on the Huron is provided
and the canoe livery itself is
classic. Within its ancient walls
are four equally ancient musical
instruments which are worth the
trip out--a player piano, a player
violin, a player organ (with cym-
bals) and a player one man band
complete with drums, horns and
strings. A quarter will start any
one of these supurb musical ma-
chines straight out of the 19th
Century.
With all its drawbacks, Ann Ar-
bor preserves much of small town
atmosphere. University students
provide the action, but the town
itself can offer repose to the weary.
Robert Junker was Daily
City Editor last year. He grad-
uated with a B.A. in English
and will continue his studies
at the Harvard business ad-
ministration school this fall.

SHOP
FROM

E

CRAFTED CONTRAST-A familiar and traditional view-the high squared shoulders of University hospital rising from the graceful
thicket that clusters around its complex bloc of structures-receives a new perspective framed by definitive steel girders that constitute
the foundations of a new apartment construction project.

"KNOWHOW" acquir
ryears of bookselling e
has enabled us to gathe
USED TEXTBOOKS fr
the Nation.
Our Staff has spent m4
piling accurate informteU iest aut
book requirements this
Complete and mail t
tached coupon to get 3
early and avoid the la
rush.

long overdue, but the Democrats
couldn't hold this brief gain and
lost last fall. All this says that
beneath the gilded University ex-
terior beats the isolationist, pro-
vincial heart of mid-America right
under our'own dorm windows.

F Gorsythe Galer
201 Nickels Arcade-- NOrmandy 3-0918

ANN ARBOR is one of the few
places left in our suburbia-
oriented society, where one can
walk from the heart of town into
the country in less than half an
hour. And the countryaround
Ann Arbor is full of parks and
lakes and farms. -Some of the
farms are the rural homes of the
industrial elite of Detroit, but the
fact remains that the city child
from New York can walk briskly
out of her dorm on the hill and
for
Records
DISC SHOP
1210 S. University NO 3-6922
OPEN EVENINGS

soon reach cows and sheep and
poultry in their natural environ-
ment.
For the less hardy, the Uni-
versity maintains a zoo behind the
Museum building.
The country around the city is

being eaten away little by little
with housing developments and
such. The river area behind the
hospital is now full of ranch style
homes and giant apartment build-
ings but one can see the trees still.
Continued on Page Eleven

. P mDaily

Vol. 1 No. 1

Tuesday, September 15, 1959

A Graduate's Advice for Freshmen
by Robert Junker

Page Two

-1

Contemporary Art

Housing Is Not Living
by Jean Spencer Page Three
Library System Fills Multiple Student Needs
by Philip Shermon Page Four
The City and the University: A Complex Continuum
by Thomas Hayden Page Six
Modern American Art: A New National Genre
Page Eight

Come In and Browse!

I

Open Persuaders?
by Judith Doner
Tunisia: Blend of France and Orient
by David Errera

WAHR'S
University Bookstore
316 So. State St.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
I am enrolled in the following
the fall semester, 1960: ....

Page Nine

Page Ten

Cours

-1

IM

__
'

a9

HEADQUARTERS for
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
OFFICE FURNITURE, TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS

PHOTOS-Cover, Pages 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11: David Giltrow. Pages 4, 5,
9: University News Service.
COVER PHOTO: The concrete but hypothetical construction pictured
was a project of students in the Architecture and Design School.
It depicts Ann Arbor and the central campus area as they should
be developed. This project is especially interesting in view of the
many and varied architectural specimens that dot the campus.
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
10'U4 (V.*2ive good-

# ".. . . . .9 f " # f # # f f " " " " a " ".

I
I
1
;es for
...i.
* , * 1
.I1
1
curingI

SMITH-CORONA & OLYMPIA
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable
ALL MAKES, bought, sold,
rented, repaired
TERMS: We try to suit customer.

FOUNTAIN PENS all makes
Sales & Service
by Factory-trained men.

Please reserve my books for me
used copies wherever possible.

sec

I I

PIZZA

Typewriter Repair Work a Specialty
DEALER for A. B. Dick Mimeographs
and Supplies
STUDENT SUPPLIES

El .
L-------------------------

CHAIRS

wiII be served daily
from 12 Noon to 2 P.M.
and 5 P.M. to 4 A.M.
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE

fI

Stationery
Study Lamps
Note Books
Fountain Pens
Loose Leaf Note Books
Greeting Cards
Typewriter Supplies

SPECIAL
ON SURPLUS
3-ring heavy,
baci note books
1/ " ring ... 97c

SWELLING SAM,-Between its numerous dams (sometimes frus-
trating to the canoer), the Huron lies calm as a lake, current-
less and ruffled by just enough wind to make sailing ideal for the
private citizen fortunate enough to have the time-and the boat.

DESKS

OPEN 24 HOURS

CLOSED TUESDAYS

FILES
Phone
NO 3-2481

FREE DELIVERY

Since
1908

MORRILL'S
314 South State Street

I

THOMPSON'S
RESTAURANT
221 N. Main St. -- Opposite the Post Office

When Important People come to town
.. highlight their visit with luncheon or dinner at the
Corner House -where food, service and surroundings
meet your every wish. Tuesday through Saturday, 11:30
to 2:00 and 5:00 to 7:00. Sunday: Dinner, 12:00 to
3:00. May we suggest that you
telephone for reservations?
'Vie Corner Jioule
S. Thayer at Washtnton in Ann Arbor
A blek west of Rackhom Bldg.-NO 8-6056

1I

H

I

University Boi
316 South State

I

iA

for over 50 years."

11

Phone NOI

-9550 or NO 3-3857

"Oft"

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