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December 14, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE EIMICI IGANIJ'AILY______

LOTION:
iah, Glick
ebate Plan

'Frohliche Weihnachten'

Create Committee To Work
On Culture Unit Formation

U

.

For Group
By RALPH KAPLAN
The question of which organi-
ations should have the responsi-
ility for directing international'
tudent affairs will be debated
when a motion by Brian Glick,
62, is presented to Student Gov-
rnment Council tonight.
Glick's motion would abolish the
resent International Coordinat-
ng Board, limit the functions of
3C's International Committee,
,nd establish an International Re-
ations Committee.
"The International Relations
3ommittee is a crucial part of
he motion," Glick said in a dis-
ussion of the motion with M. A.
Ryder Shah, Grad. 'This has been
,he most neglected area of inter-
iational student affairs at -the
Iniversity and because it has been
ieglected there has been a great
ack of communication between
Ioreign and American students on
ampus."
Glick is president of the Inter-
iational Coordinating Board, and
Shah is an SGC member and past
>resident of the International Stu-
lents' Association.
Reservations
"I have serious reservations
bout this motion although I would
iot say I am definitely opposed to
b," Shah said. "In the past, SGC
ias passed motions and approved
rganizations too quickly without
:iving due consideration to their
'uture dangers.
"'Organizations concerned with
nternational student affairs at
his campus have heretofore been
oo dependent on their chairman.
3GC should give strong powers to
is present International Commit-
Re so there will be an organiza-
,ion thatwill stay basically the
ame inspite of changes in lead-
rship."
Glick said the International
ommittee was established by the
Douncil to provide services to for-
gn and American students which
ould not be provided by the In-
ernational Coordinating Board.
No Reason
"There is no reason for the In-
ernational Committee to expand
ts functions simply because the
CB is being abolished," he com-
nented. "The purplse of this mo-
ion is to establish a program that
will deal with all areas of inter-
national student affairs that need
o be considered. If the motion is
>assed, then these organizations
will have the permanent strue-
ure needed for continued opera-
ions in their areas. This will al-
eviate the problem of organiza-
ions being smaller than their
hairman."

A committee of three city leg-
islators was established this week
to iron out details'in the formation
of an Ann Arbor art and culture
commission.
The Ann Arbor Art and Design
Committee, headed by Prof. Wal-
ter Chambers, chairman of the
landscape architecture depart-
ment, recommended in its final
report to City Council that a Civic
Art Commission be established by
law.
Such a group, Prof. Chambers.
said, would be responsible for "a
vigorous educational program"
and control of new building in
the city to insure "good function-
al design and visual environment."
The committee has held 16
meetings since it was set up by
the council in March, 1959. In
recommending its own dissolution

and establishment of the new
commission, Prof. Chambers' group
sketched what commissions in
other cities have done.
Under an ordinance in Berke-
ley. Calif., such a group encour-
ages and gains support for cultural
organizations, and gives advice to
the council on city beautification,,
purchasing of works or arts, sites
and approaches for municipal
projects.
The Berkeley group also makes
recommendations on placement or
removal of art the city owns, ad-
vises school builders, and makes
a semi-annual survey of art in the
city.
Prof. Chambers envisioned a
similar role for the Ann Arbor
group, and said that "ugliness
usually costs more than beauty."

FANTASTIC SAVINGS
Check These Prices:.

v ELLA FITZGERALD
SONG BOOKS 4.98 list ea. LPF
2.98 easL.P

SEARCH FOR JOY-The hero of A. Goes's play "Der Mensch von Unterweg" (The Man from on the
Way) searches for Joy in its pure form and finds through experience that Joy is never unmixed. The
play was presented as part of a Christmas party by the Deutscher Verein, the University German Club.
Students and faculty of the German department took part in the production.
BUSINESSMEN.

AT HILLEL-AT 8-TONIGHT
Rabbi Morris Adler
speaks on
"THE OUTLOOK FOR THE FUTURE"
last lecture in the series
"A Look at the Jewish Community in America"

Kar . unchingr
Stuttgart Orchestra
3.96

BRANDENBURG
CONCERTOS (complete)

To View Co
By RISA AXELROD
The role of the electric computer
in "business games" will be an-
alyzed by a group of 22 business
men today, in the first part of a
two-day session sponsored by the
Bureau of Industrial Relations.,
This new use of computers in
analyzing hypothetical business
conditions and determining the
probable success of various de-
cisions under those conditions has
proved to be an innovation in ap-
plied teaching methods.
First used by the school of Busi-
ness Administration in the spring
of 1959, the computers now con-
stitute the basis ofr a one-hour
Business Administration course
called "Business Games," and of-
fered to graduate students.
Competing Groups
In this course the students are
divided into groups, or competing
firms. Each firm is given specified
business conditions: including
factory size, production costs, ad-
vertising costs, and market re-
ports.
With the understanding that
what their competitors do will af-
fect them, each group must decide
how to plan production, promo-
tion and product price to gain the
most profit.
The decisions are submitted to
the computer, which then calcu-
lates the immediate outcome and

)mputer's Role i Games

All Are Welcome

1429 Hill St.

3
1
f
l
c
t
1
1
1
a

indicates the success or failure of wouldn't be likely to take in ac-
the firm's decisions. tual business," observed Prof.
The computer takes into account Franklin G. Moore, co-ordinator
the business index and seasonal of the "Business Games" course.
trends, as well as the decisions Worthwhile
made by competitors.But gaes a most worth
It often takes the students two whButinth amhe esahmothworth-
of three hours to interpret the went t heyktach theantyz-
detailed computer reports and dents to look forward, toanalyze
make further decisions on the figures and to work together in
basis of them, if necessary. The groups," he added,
total time taken by the computer At the present the most fre-
to make the 10,000 calculations for quent game emnplyed is the "UCLA
each report is only two minutes. Game," so-called because it origin-
"Students are more apt to take ated at the University of California
chances in the games that they at Los Angeles, In this game the
class is divided into four teams,
each with three products to sell.
The products consist of a low,;
medium and high quality class.
. The students must decide the
W ins Support most effective way to increase the
-p market for each product; how and
o Shov much to advertise; whether to
F rom enate increase or decrease budgets for
styling and design; and at what
The Women's Senate passed by rate production should be main-
a 21 to 2 majority yesterday a tained.
proposal from its executive com- The school of business adminis-
mittee to support a voluntary pro- tration is not the only part of
gram of seminar sessions for the University to make use of
seniors. business games. The computers
"We propose a voluntary pro- have been used in Industrial En-
gram of seminar sessions com- gineering with equal success.
posed of several students and a ~~~~~~-~~~b t~~n h
faculty member to be taken in the
senior's major field during the OR H~ T A
senior year. These sessions shouldr G
be offered as a regular course in
the University curriculum and
credit be given," the Senate re-J
solved. I B V D-MOR
In a discussion preceding the U
passage of the proposal, it was
mentioned that these seminar ses- 11C3 S. University NO 2-6362
sions may become too large be- ---------------
cause of a lack of qualified fac- -- - -
ulty members to conduct the sem- --------
inars. THE UNEQUALLED
The idea was also presented for BLUES AND FOLK TEAM
a similar type of seminar program SUNNY TERRY AND
for either the end of the sopho-
more or beginning of the junior BROWNIE McGHEE
year. These seminars would serve Performing nightly thru
to orient the student in his ma- Dec. 31 from 9 P.M. to 2 A.M.
jor field,
Questions pertaining to the field Fri. and Sat. to 4 P.M.
would be presented and a general CLOSED MONDAYS
survey of the field and its subjectE ALERIE
area given. No attempt to answer C G
specific questions would be made, 19940 Livernois, Detroit
however, as that would not be the UN2-4455 north of outer drive
purpose of the seminars.
The Women's Senate is now
drafting the final copy of its pro-
posal complete with the reasons
for its selection. The proposal will
be presented to the faculty c r-
riculum committee of the literary
college,

La Sociedad Hispanica
CHRISTMAS PARTY
$FIESTA DIE NAVIDAD
Wednesday, Dec. 14
Miercoles, 1 e Dic.
a las ocho 8:00 P.M.
3050 Frieze Building
Programa -Baile Refrescos
Door Prizes Premios-
VENGAN TODOS !
U

SVIATOSLAV
RICHTER playing
Bach-Concerto No. 1
Schumann-Piano Concerto
Rachmaninoff-Concerto No. 2
Tchaikovsky-Piano Concerto
eao
z- KATHLEEN FERRIER
Bach-St. Matthew Passion
(complete)
5.95

DIAL
NO 2-6264

W b
woe,

ENDS
TON IGHT

I

'a

TODAY
DIAL
NO 8-6416

'X ' 1
®' i
, q i i iil llllM Itl4
P ' R ,' 4 Ui ' d U ,; . l klW
.

SHOWS
AT
7-9 P.M.

TCHAIKOVSKY
SLEEPING BEAUTY
(complete)

THURSDAY

I

I

CURT JURGENS A s
k a
1C nsco rrcum
GENEVIVE P-G

3.96

4

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F fl _ _._...._ __

Ends
Thursday

~:
it . , ihr,;., ',"rl "' " ;' j hll

DIAL
NO 5-6290

t' an On-the-Ball Riot About an Off-Limits Romance!
-131about o
top-kicks...
-- "'' " nd top sil

Folk Society
To Hold Sing
The Folklore Society will present
its annual Christmas Chanukah
Sing at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Aud. A.
The sing will be held in concert
form with Al Young, '61, and the
Sara Beth Richman dancers per-
forming. There will also be group
singing which will include both
aseasonal holiday songs and carols
and other tunes.

rDIAMOND NEEDLES
unconditionally guaranteed
5.95
EXTRA SPECIAL
r ALL DECCA ARCHIVES
~ ALL DEUTSCHE
GRAMMOPHON
v ALL RCA LM SERIES
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OFF
HI-FI 20 (MFG. STEREO
LST

\fWILLIAM IIAllELI80 MICR UhSE
1SHIRLEY EATN. ERIC BAKEN
NORABRYA " BILL OWEN
KEWNET CONOR

A GOVERNOR FlIMS RELEASET

COMING FRIDAY
"Wizard of Baghdad" and "For The Love of Mike"

Tried
Regular
Filter
Cigarettes?

At

Cl

ACWR and YOUNG DEMOCRATS

present

JAMES O'HARA
U.S. Representative from Michigan

NOW! Come Up...AII The Way Up
to the MENTHOL MAGIC
of KOOL ! r

DISC SHOP " CETER
1210 5.Uny.j 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

I

snenkina ann

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