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December 11, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VR Studies Former Colonies'

Needs
to a higher degree than the West-
ern leaders ever would have.
"The West has left a four point
legacy to these underdeveloped
countries: The dual economy sys-
tem, the one commodity export,
the native political leaders and the
concepts of democracy and free-
dom. The concept of democracy
that the natives are familiar with
has not been good to them. The
native political rulers have made
the situation 'intolerable.'
"The native reformers are most-
ly anti-colonial, anti-Western, an-
ti capitalist, anti-free economy,
and anti-local vested interests,"
the economist said. "Put the
U.S.S.R. in this context with their
ideology and political interests and
the situation is vastly complicated.
Russia can act unhindered in
these countries to win friends. Not
so with the West, which is limit-
ed by the economic interests of
its nationals. '
"The main problem is how to.
accommodate capitalism to the
rapid political changes going on in
these countries."
Prof. David Milstein of the eco-
nomics department said "It is bet-
ter to use the extent of the three
human curses of poverty, ignor-
ance, and disease than statistical
indexes to prove underdevelop-
ment.
"One main problem of poor na-
tions is that they are so poor that
they cannot afford to spare the
capital and manpower that it takes
to build the country to the point
where it is no longer poor," Prof.
Milstein said. "You cannot have
industrialization without surpluses
of products, money, and men.
Resources Have Effect
"Not all troubles are due to
colonialism, though. Climactic
conditions and natural resources
do effect the situation of a coun-
try.
"Another main problem that
arises when a larger country tries
to assist a smaller one is that not
everyone wants development. The
absentee land-owners don't want
development, because they are
making money, as are the busi-
nessmen. And the military and
the clergy are usually conserva-
tive.
"In essence the reason under-
developed countries are underde-
veloped is that an awful lot of
people have an interest in keep-
ing them underdeveloped.
"The cost of development will
be relatively large. In expenditure
of time of the corps members the
cost will be high, but in taxes to
the citizen the price will be rea-
sonable," he said.
Great Social Conflict
"There will be a great social
sand political conflict arising with
the development of these coun-
tries. We must not be naive and
expect that sending out technical
assistance will solve all problems,
and we will have to become ac-
customed to having more socialism
than we are used to."
"The advice I offer to you for
this program is to get as well edu-
cated as possible with as broad a
background as is possible," Prof.
Milstein concluded.
Prof. Ronald Shearer of the
economics department also spoke
as a member of the panel.
"TheYouth Corps will be able
to perform only a minor techni-
cal assistance role. Young students
can't set up steel plants," Prof.
RShearer said,
"I suggest that you think long
- and hard about what you can do
g to help people in a field other
c than primary education or similar
a areas. You are young, untrained,
- immature people, and the possi-

bilities for service are so limited
, that you will quite possibly be-
xcome frustrated in your desire to
help."

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Iglehart Notes Artistry S.G.C.
In Modern Advertising Cilem' u

Advertising is now emerging as
one of the "arts" of today and
has usurped many of the functions
which formerly belonged to the
novel, the drama and the painting,
Prof. Robert Iglehart, chairman of
the art department said.
"I believe the growth of pro-
fessionalism will mean a steadily
increasing relationship between
the practice of advertising and
the universities, as professionalism
has increased such relationship in
the cases of medicine, dentistry,
law, and teaching," he commented
in the preface of the current issue
of "Dimension," an architecture
school publication.
Prof. Iglehart looks on adver-
tising as an art, and believes it is
an encouraging fact that we can
still consider questions which can-
not be answered by electronic de- ;
vices. "One of these incalculables
would surely be the effect of
advertising on the American life."
Prof. Iglehart said that the
money we spend on advertising
"produces art, literature, and ac-
tion-all affecting us far beyond
the matter of our purchase of
this or that service or product."
He cited advertising as affecting
every facet of our lives-"even the
habits of our dogs and our house
plants"-and in this it takes' its
place among the other forms of
art that form our culture.
Advertising is customarily traced
back to Egypt and the Greek
criers, but the first advertising
agency, as such, was established in
1840.
He demonstrated the rising
quality of advertising by referring
to late 19th century advertise-
ments in his article. "Like other
professional tools,' 'he said, "these
have not always been employed in
the public interest."
"Anyone who doubts that pro-
fessionalism has been accompanied
by a steadily increasing sense of
ethics and responsibility need only
refer to such advertisements as
"Bromo-Phosph or Brain Food"
("Sovereign Remedy for every

form of mental and physical weak-
ness, held in highest esteem by
clergymen in all parts of the na-
tion"); or "Sand's Sarsparilla"
("For purifying blood in all cases
where blood is impoverished or
depraved").
"In spite of the charm of much
of this early salesmanship," he
continued, "the level of visual
quality and literacy has also risen
enormously."
It wasn't until the invention of
printing that advertising could
really take hold, for until then
the system of argument and sug-
gestion, used widely in modern
advertising, was largely impossible.
The development of mercuries
(newspapers) gave rise to more
widespread advertising, as ads for
tea, chocolate and coffee first ap-
peared in the middle of the 17th
century.
And even when advertising was
young, it soon became a common
place, so much so that it caused
Dr. Samuel Johnson to comment
that "advertisements are now so
numerous that they are negligent-
ly perused, and it has therefore
become necessary to gain attention
by magnificence of promises and
by eloquence sometimes sublime
and somethings pathetick."

LAST PERFORMANCE
TONIGHT

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS - Dept. of Speech
Sean O'Casey's wayward comedy
PURPLEr
UT,8:00 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

TODAYsthrough
Tuesday
"A WELCOME ADDITION TO
THE LIST OF MOVIE
COMEDIES AT OUR
DISPOSAL.
Fernandel, as always,
provides a fascinating -
gallery of expressions!"
"Unforgettably funny
scenes that restore
Fernandel to thae
stature of old!"
I ' -
f ml
Lijy

DIAL
NO 8-6416

Season subscribers:
Exchange coupons now
for tickets to
SEASON OF THE BEAST
JAN. 10-14

Box office open
10-8
Thursday-$1.50, $1.00
Fri. & Sat. - 1 .75, $1.25
Sunday -: 0, 1.00

IL

K
a
Y
r
...

DIAL NO 2-6264

STARTS

TODAY

I

DIAL NO 5-6290

I-
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
COUNCIL
announces
PETITIONING

I

I

"iE HOW IS
IT POSSIBLE TO BRING
SUBJECT MATTER LIKE
"GR OF TE NIHT
"GL FT ENGTTO THE MOTION PICTURE
SCREEN? ... BY STICKING TO
THE FACTS OFA DEL/CA TE THEME-
BY FOLLOWING IN PURPOSE AND
EXECUTION THE PREMISE OF THE
WIDELY-DISCUSSED BEST-SELLER-
BY MAKING AUTHENTIC, EXCIT-
ING AND UNIQUE ENTERTAINMENT
-BY RECOGNIZING THA T THE
STORY OF BOBBIE WILLIAMS
HAS A MEANING FOR YOUNG
WOMENEVERYWHERE'

if

'ABOUNDS IN DAFT
'TIIE L40809 ARE
THERE A-PLEMJT II.c

for

CARRYING ON ALL THE LAUGHS
£~ALL THE LUNACY O~,

lI q

ith
that
same
cut-up
Same crew!.
femme!
Some
flenI f

.7

* EARLY REGISTRATION PASS
COMMITTEE
* HUMAN RELATIONS BOARD
* STUDENT BOOK EXCHANGE
* CINEMA GUILD
* ELECTIONS DIRECTOR
Petitions available at
Student Go-vernment Council Offices
First Floor, Student Activities Building

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