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December 11, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN 9AILY
I -~ '"' flUID

Embattled Algerian City
uiet Following Violence

-AP Wirephoto
FIGHTS BACK - A riot policeman hurls a stone at rightist demonstrating in Algiers yesterday
against President Charles de Gaulle's home-rule policy for strife-torn Algeria. Riot squads and army
troops used tear gas bombs to quell demonstrators. The city settled down to relative quiet last
night.
WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Dillon Possibility for Cabinet Position
V ____________________________--__

Europeans,
Arabs Clash
In Algiers
Arabs, Settlers Clash;
De Gaulle Supports
Determination Policy
ALGIERS (P)-- An edgy calm
settled over this embattled city
last night in the wake of violent
clashes between Moslem suppor-
ters of French President Charles
de Gaulle and anti-Gaullist Euro-
pean settlers.
The battles erupted near the end
of the second straight day of mob
action by settlers protesting de
Gaulle's policy of self-determina-
tion for Algeria.
The North Africans and settlers
fought as de Gaulle spoke to 400
army officers at nearby Blida,
urging them to forget the past
and support creation of an Algeria
in which both Moslems and Euro-
peans would play significant roles.
Pouring unexpectedly out of the
until-then silent Casbah, about
3.000 North Africans staged the
first large-scale Arab demon-
strations in this territorial capital.
They set fire to a gasoline sta-
tion, sacked a department store,
smashed shop windows and slash-
ed the tires of parked cars on a
march down the Rue de Lyon.
Shouting "Algeria is Algerian,"
they pushed through a barrage of
flower pots and other missiles
hurled by Europeans from the
windows of buildings lining the
street, then clashed with a crowd
of waiting settlers.
Riot police backed by troops
hurled tear gas grenades and dis-
persed the mobs.
Then police had to swing into
action again when Moslem bands
streamed into the city from
suburban shantytowns, setting, off
a new wave of disorders.
A government spokesman blamed
the fighting on what he called
professional rioters bent on driving
a wedge between Algeria's Euro-
pean and Moslem communities,
TO Postpone
UN Post Reply
NEW YORK () - Adla E.
Stevenson indicated yesterday that
he will not announce his decision
whether to accept an appointment
as representative to the United
Nations until the country's new
Secretary of State is disclosed.
"I will have to discuss it further
with the President-elect and also
the with Secretary of State," he
said.
"Does that mean that the ap-
pointment of the Secretary of
State would precede your appoint-
ment?" he was asked.
"I think yes," Stevenson said.

Cubans Hit
Insurgents,
Unionists
HAVANA (T)-The Castro regime
struck three hard blows at its
enemies yesterday - condemning
civilian plane hijackers, moving
troops against insurgents in the
mountains and lashing at discon-
tented labor unionists.
Four Cubans were sentenced to
death before a firing squad for
trying to seize a Cuban airliner
high above Cienfuegos. A fifth was
captured as the other were on
trial. He faces the same fate.
The govei'nment sent fresh
troops into central Cuba's Escam-
bray mountains in a new effort to
smash insurgents operating there.
Labor Battle
And the Cuban Confederation of
Labor, powerful leftist group,
readied a new battle to oust direc-
tors of the strong electrical work-
ers union in Havana for failing to
follow the set policy line.
A military court in Santa Clara
deliberated less than an hour,
then ordered four men lined up
and shot for trying to divert a
domestic flight Thursday night to-
ward the United States. The pilot
resisted and crash-landed his Cu-
bana Air Lines plane with 17
aboard, despite his own wounds.
Insurgents Sought
At the same time, Cuban forces
of considerable strength moved
southward in adjacent Matanzas.
In Havana ,meanwhile, a split
in government - controlled labor
ranks erupted Friday night with a
surprise march on the presidential
palace by a faction of electrical
unionists. They chanted "Cuba si,
Russia no." The confederation re-
sponded by calling a midnight as-
sembly of electrical workers to
condemn "traitors" within that
union.
Ilse Plays Golf
While Negroes
Demonstrate
AUGUSTA, Ga. A') - About 60
Negroes picketed the swank Au-
gusta National Golf Club while
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
played golf there yesterday.
White House Press Secretary
James H. Hagerty said Eisenhower
was unaware of their presence.
"I have no comment on it at all,"
Hagerty said. "I am not going to
seek comment."
W. W. Bennett of the Georgia
State Patrol, who estimated the
number of pickets at 60, said they
included two members of the
faculty of Paine College, coeduca-
tional Negro school.
Bennett said there were no dis-
orders and that the pickets made
no attempt to enter, the club
grounds, which are completely se-
cluded from the street outside.
SChristmas Trees J
For Sale
All sizes from table top '
to Church trees
# 537 Detroit St., corner N. Division 4

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Under Secre-
tary of State Douglas Dillon met
with President-elect John F. Ken-
nedy in Dil' on's home here Thurs-
day evening. They had a 45-min-
ute discussion of international fi-
nancial, trade and aid problems.

Dillon's special assistant, Dixon
Donnelley, issued a brief state-
ment which left wide open the
possibility that Dillon might take
some high position in the Kenne-
dy administration.

I"

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WASHINGTON

- The United

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States will present several "sug-
gestions" to its NATO allies in
Paris next week on organizing a
separate NATO nuclear force with
hundreds of medium range Polaris
missiles.
The heart of the powerful
striking force, according to pres-
ent planning, may be a group of
half a dozen or more Polaris-
armed nuclear submarines which
the United States could provide to
the allies over the next few years.
* * *
WASHINGTON-Senate Demo-
crats are preparing a drive to
try to pass a depressed areas bill
early next year as the first ma-
)or bill in the new administra-
tion.
Sen. Paul H. Douglas (D-Ill),
who will be a key figure in the
push, told a reporter yesterday he
expected to be ready to introduce
the legislation as soon as Con-
gress meets Jan. 3.
* 9 *
PARIS-President Charles de
Gaulle's police held France in an
iron grip last night. While violence
continued to sweep the big cities
of Algeria, there was no sign of
disorder on this side of the Medi-
terranean.
Chances of an extremist coup
d'etat-never very likely to meet
success-seemed to be dwindling
hourly. Even the rumors of plots
and counter-plots, which have
swept Paris for weeks, died away-
in the past 48 hours.

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