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November 18, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N DAILY

k. ,

IANAGEMENT VIEWS:
yak on Economic Situation

ntema Gives Critctism
Of Graduate Educationl

.,..

By MICHAEL BURNS
bor has been victimized by
on," a University of Chicago
nist charged yesterday at
ting here of the eighth an-
'onference on the Economi-
uitlook.
on Rottenberg, presenting
ew of organized labor, told
idience that wage hikes have
I behind prices rises and
abor has gained "less than
oportionate share of general
ctivity."
aking from management's
pint, George Hitchings, vice-
ent for economic researchof
can Airlines, claimed that
on was only one part of the
,r problem of "distortion" of
onomic imbalance.'
Cites Rising Costs
problemr of a rising cost
ure has created the squeeze
gher prices and unemploy-
,he said. The real danger is
he market will not be strong
;h to bear the higher prices
dd by increasing costs.
tenberg listed three factors
iaffect labor's economic
: inflation, foreign competi-
and automation.
the five years when 93 per
of the price rise since World
II occurred, "none can be
uted -to wage pushes," he
The rises were due to high
mer demand, business ex-
on and the Korean conflict
government deficit spending.
nior Society
LS Women

"Wages don't push prices up,"
he emphasized. The average hourly
compensation for labor between.
1947-57 rose about 35.2 per cent
compared with a real productivity'
increase of 37 per cent.
Hitchings pointed out that pro-
fits have been cut sharply in his
organization and that without an
adequate profit, capital investment
is discouraged, thus preventing In-
dustry from expanding either em-
ployment or productivity.
The expenses of unit production
due to costs other than labor have
greatly increased, he said, while
prices have not kept up with this
gain.
Inflation Continues
Hitchings said that although
consumer demand may have
created the inflationary conditions
before 1951, the trends have con-
tinued despite a change in con-
sumner philosophy.
"Pay rates have outstripped
productivity," he emphasized.
There has not been a sufficient
output increase to justify the high
wage increase packages which
has sought, he said.

4

There is no "magic formula" for
determining wages with respect
to output, Hitchings said.
The solution to the problem of_
rising cost structure is not asa
simple as concentration on one
sector of the economic picture he
explained.1
Backs Growth Rate
Rottenberg supported a growth
rate of four to five per cent which
would aid the economy as a
whole," he said.
He also suggested a government
board to which any major com-
pany expecting a price rise would,
submit a rationale and explanation
for the boost. The hearing results
would be published so that the
public would know at least when
and where a price rise was coming,
he said.
Rottenberg disputed the claim,
of an unfavorable trade balance
in the United States and said we
have not had a trade deficit since
1894.
But management has attempted
to blame domestic wage demands
labor has sought, he said,
for the reputed trade imbalance,
Rottenberg also noted that al-
though the AFL-CIO favors a
generally liberal foreign trade
policy, it does support certain
trade restrictions and subsidies
for necessary or needy industries.
He also mentioned that the
government, management, and the
unions must share the responsibil-
ity for combatting automation -
another cause of unemployment.

By BEATRICE TEODORO

Graduate studies should enrich
a liberal education rather than
provide narrow highly specialized
training, Theodore Yntema said
last night speaking as an employer
to the Annual Conference on
Higher Education.
"Usually it is insufficient to at-
tempt to provide narrowly special-
ized training in our graduate
schools; business can do this job
itself better and more economi-
cally," the finahce vice-president
of Ford Motor Company said,
"We don't want people who are
lost as soon as they find them-
selves outside their n a r r o w
specialty. We would like to have
some people who realize that, in
substantial part, the skills of their
specialty can be used in other
fields "

should be required to read mathe-
matics and understand statistics.
"Measurement and logical struc-
ture are the backbone of science,
and mathematics is its language.
And statistics is the technique of
appraising evidence."
Instruction in written English
for graduate students is also im-
portant, he said. "It does seem'
reasonable to require Ph.D.'s to
be able to read and write, which
is more than many of them can
do," he said.
More attention could also be
given to the art of dealing with
people, Yntema added, although
he realized the difficulty of or-
ganized instruction in this field.

- ----
f

Job Not Continuation

I

As Petitions
For Positions
On LSA Group
Petitioning is open for those lit-
erary college students wishing to
become members of the college
steering committee, Chairman
James Seder, '61, announced yes-
terday.
The activities of the commit-
tee include discussing and evalu-
ating college practices, devising
and suggesting solutions for prob-
lems of students and proposing
courses of action to the college ad-
ministrative board.
Students with interest, knowl-
edge and ideas concerning the ed-
ucational policies of the college
may obtain petitions in Rm. 1220
Angell Hall. Petitioning will close
at noon Dec. 8, Seder said.

Yntema emphasized that a doc-
toral graduate will rarely get a
business position that calls for
continuation of his university re-
search. Instead he will be faced
with considerably different un-
solved' problems.
Also ,for many persons with ad-
vanced degrees, opportunities in
much broader fields will open up,
he added.
Universities could improve upon
their methods for helping graduate
students cope with these problems,
he explained.

Yntema said that all graduate
students, especially in the sciences,

HAIMESON SPEAKS:
Intellectual-Worker Relations

Youth Corps,
Considered,
PRINCETON (UPS)--Delegates
to a conference on "American
Youth and the Emerging Nations"
here have voted to set up a per-
manent organization to' explore
possibilities of setting up a youth
peace corps.
More-than 100 eastern student'
leaders met with businessmen and
experts on emergent Africa, Asia
and Latin America at Princeton
University in an effort to initiate
nationwide support for the peace
corps.
Such a corps would be designed
to provide an expression of Ameri-
can concern and to work with
local problems in the world's un-
derdeveloped areas.
Participants discussed govern-
met sponsored proposals for a
peace corps offered by Represen-
tative Henry Reuss (D-Wis), and
Senator Hubert Humphrey,(1)-
Minn), both of which have been
endorsed by President-elect John
F. Kennedy in recent speeches in
San Francisco and Chicago.
A privately sponsored plan pre-
sented by Thomas Melady, African
affairs authority who called the
conference, was also discussed.
Major addresses were given by
Sir Hugh Taylor, President of the
Woodrow Wilson National Fellow-.
ship Foundation, Mr. Taylor Os-
trander of American Metals Cli-
max and Melady.
Represented at the discussions
were Kennedy, Humphrey, the
Young Adult Council, the National
Student Association and others.

See,,Reaction
As Favoring
Peace Corps.
Two University professors and
a member of the Development
Council yesterday agreed that the
reaction to the "Youth for Peace
Corps" movement was favorable,
bue expressed worries about some
of the problems facing the move-
ment.
Prof. Samuel Hayes of the eco-
nomics department, Gilbert Burs-
ley, member of the University
Development Council, and Prof.
Richard Park of the political
science department discussed the
movement in a radio broadcast
on WUOM.
Prof. Hayes pointed out that
needs and attitutes are different
in various areas of the world. "If
many young Americans should
go to these areas hoping to help,
might they not cause morediffi-
culties than they are Veally
worth?" he asked.
Bursley backed this idea. He,
said that, in previous instances'
where the United States had sent
in thousands of experts as part
of a, foreign aid. program, the
public relations problem was at
times difficult.
Prof. Park raised a second prob-
lem. He felt the "peace corps"
would face problems of health and
welfare. "The work is not glamor-
ous it is hard," he said.
CAFE
PROMETH EAN
508 E. William

ENDS
SATURDAY

s'DIAL NO 8-64 16
Best movie of 1960. sto
P4 star e so superior that
the movie emerges as whopping
entertainment and a savage satire."
SJ--ustin Gilberti Deny Mirror
LAURENCE HARVEY
.An IuN SUNDAY: "IVAN THE TERRIBLE"
THE MINOR KFY
DETROIT'S HOME OF THE JAZZ GREATS
11541 Dexter near Burlingame
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY STARTING
Tuesday, November 15 thru Sunday, November 20
ART BLAKEY and
THE JAZZ MESSANGERS

11

BUY ORIGINALS

GIVE ORIGINALS

the Top"C
in a sizzling

I 7

4th ANNUAL
CHRISTMAS SALE SHOW
open Friday evening, Nov. 18th
RACKHAM GALLERIES
8 P.M. -10 P.M.

JAZZ
'TIL DAWN
FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY
9 P.M TO
5 A.M.

Storting
Tues., November 22 - Sun., Noven
JOHN COLTRA
and HIS QUARTET

uor Society, independent
r women's honorary socie-
Lst night tapped eleven new
3ers.
ey are Nancy French, '61,
Harris, '61, Marian Johnson,
Karen Klipec, '61SM, Jan-
sse, '61, Carol Leventen, '61,
Newton, '61N, Judith Nich-
'61, Jean Oppenheimer,
Judith Sattler, '6.1, and
ne Winick, '61.

Seen Crucial in Russian RevoltI

-

TONIGHT, TOMORROW NIGHTb
University Players present Opera Workshop, School of Music
OPERA SCENES
"THE FLYING DUTCHMAN" Wagner
"HANSEL UND GRETEL" Humperdinck
"I PAGLIACCI" Leoncavallo
$1.00
TRUEBLOOD AUD., FRIEZE BLDG., 8:00 P.M.
Tickets available from 12 noon at Trueblood Aud. box office

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
Changing relationships between
liberal and radical elements of
the int'elligentsia and the work-
ing classes were crucial to the
trend of Russian political move-
ment during the years just prior
to the revolution, Prof. Leopold
Haimeson of the University of
Chicago said yesterday.
In his talk Prof. Haimeson cited
a change in the outlook of the
intellectuals as acontributing fac-
tor to the 1917 revolution.-
Following the disintegration of
the October revolution of 1905,
the intelligentsia, or informed in-
tellectual segment of Russian so-
ciety, became increasingly ab-
sorbed in professional and family
affairs and divested itself of its
traditional concern with public
duty and radical social reform.
Talk To Consider
Academic Women
Prof. Jesse Bernard of Pennsyl-
vania State University will speak
on "Academic Woman" at 3 p.m.'
today in Aud. C. The lecture, open
to the public, will be under the
auspices of the sociology depart-
ment.

The intelligentsia had formerly
been proponents of radical poli-
tical ideas and had attempted to
convert workers into a revolution-
ary force, finally bringing about
a general strike involving thou-
sands of Petersburg workers in
October, 1905.

I

After the strike, Prof. Haimeson
said, much of the intelligentsia
began to withdraw its attention
from the organization of the
working class and failed to sup-
port further strikes.
The remaining social-democrat-
ic element of the intelligentsia
became polarized between two
parties, the Bolsheviks and the
Mensheviks.

FolkSongI- Fri., Sat.
Featuring
AL YOUNG
MIKE SHERKER
CAROLE WERNER
8:30 P.M. til ?
Sunday, Nov. 20-8:00 P.M.
JAZZ
Featuring the New Music
of the
OMAR CLAY-BOB JAMES TRIO

PAINTINGS
PRINTS
SCULPTURE-

CERAMICS
DRAWINGS
JEWELRY

Sponsored by
ANN ARBOR ART ASSOCIATION
Sale will continue
Nov. 17 to Nov. 26, 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. daily
CLOSED THANKSGIVING AND SUNDAYS
Items priced from 50 cents tofifty dollars

TOYS

I

'I

i

DIAL
0 2-6264

* ENDS SATURDAY *
SKIPPED, RAW AND ROARING FROM REAL UFE!

Believe in Industrialization
The Mensheviks believed Russia
had reached a point in industrial
development comparable to west-
ern European nations, and at-
tempted to establish trade un-
ions and open party meetings, and
to curtail underground activity.
The Bolshevik intelligentsia re-
fused to give up its traditional
revolutionary orientation.
By 1914, two elements had
evolved in the labor force.

i

Dunlap To Speak
On Researchers
Jack W. Dunlap of Dunlap As-
sociates, Inc., will deliver a talk
on "Homo Researchiens-The Care
and Feeding Of" at the psychology
colloquium at 4:15 today in Aud.
B.

UNIVERSITY LECTURE

DR. 'PAUL TILLICH

A

!Soo

. wKas1
onoMWMTALBAM
EWu FITZGERALD
*S
STARTS SUNDAY

I

L

prise cast! Surprise ssty! Prwo-~pek .come
COLumDA ~ PCTURES pomwm ASTANLEY DONEN PCC~f
BRYNNER - MITZI SAYNOR - NOEL COWARD
"SURPRISE PACKAGE"

r!'

CHRISTMAS CARDS OF CHARACTER
RUST CRAFT
Piious
CARDS
inkeeping
with the'
TRUE
SPIRIT
S OF
CHRISTMAS
You will find
*a beautiful
selection
in our display

Two Worker Groupsr
The workers drawn into the in-
dusttial army during the 1890's
tended to be influenced by the
Mensheviks while the new gen-
eration of workers, bitter, dissat-
isfied and adjusting with diffi-
culty to urban life, leaned toward
the Bolsheviks.
A wide chasm openedbetween
the older elite and the newer
masses of the workers which only
the hardened Bolshevik intellec-
tual minority was ultimately able
to bridge and exploit for its own
purposes, Prof. Haimeson said.

I

I

-...

To GiveTalk
On Symbolism

I

M
t

GOTHIC FILM'
SOCIETY

Sergei Eisenstein's
STRIKE
(Russia, 1924)
and

Philosopher- Theologian

KINO PRAVDA
(Soviet propaganda
newsreel, 1942)
Monday, November 21, at 8
p.m., in Rockham Amphi-
theatre. Admission is solely by
subscription to the remaining 8
programs of. the 1960-61 se-
ries. Subscriptions. cost ,$4.00
each; they can be obtained be-
fore the showing. For further
information, call NO 2-9539 or
NO 2-6685.

,;

"Symbolism.- Its Significance in Religion"

TODAY at 4:15 P.M.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

On

MUSKET 1960
presents

sponsored by Religious Affairs

:SMET

Theologian, Harvard University,
will speak on the subject: "Sym-
bolism: Its Significance in Reli-
gion" at 4:15 p.m. in Rackham
Lecture Hall today.
The University lecture will be
open to the public.

..I

November 30,

December

1 21,3

Matinee Dec. 3

Men's Glee Club
To Sing at OSU

You can SEA for yourself
it's an OCEAN of laughter...
and the BIKINI of the end
for thecaptain1?:

Tickets at Michigan Union
Saturday 9-12
November 14 thru 23
1:15 to 5:00 Daily

II MORRILL'S

TODAY
DIA.562,0
The Rank Organization presents
fJOHN
GREGSON
3 PEGGY

'I

314 S. State

NO 3-2481

The Men's Glee Club will pre-
sent a joint concert with the Ohio
State University Men's Glee Club
tomorrow night after the annual
football game between the schools
at Mershon Aud. in Columbus.

CHRISTMAS CARDS OF CHARACTER

rl

w

w

.o

T

i

S.oG.C. Cinema ajild
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and Sunday at 7 and 9:35
Stanley Kramer's production of Carson McMullers' RICHARD il
MEMBER OF THE WEDDING (COLOR)

27 niL.k fl£ALk-brunn"-F~c~7



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