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November 03, 1960 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SHMEN ADMISSIONS:
aroesbeek Evaluates poi cles

Just. Barging In

R'S NOTE: This is the
t of a two part series on
admission.)
LICHAEL OLINICK

e of the best backgroundj
ences for this job is actu-
work," Assistant Director of
sions Byron Groesbeck said
day. ,.
appraising the 11,000 fresh-I
ipplications that will flood
office this year, Groesbeck
ied that the Admissionsj
is often "saved by statis-
Because the applicants areI
rrkably predictable" as a
, the admission officer needsj
to evaluate the individual
it. "He need not concern
If about admitting more1
han girls, more philosophers
spanish majors," Groesbeck
e have about the same per-
ge breakdown of sex, schools
aajors every year. When we
ish a level of achievement
imission and admit students
is basis only, we don't have!
ry about overstocking Mark-
id leaving one of the -quad-
n half-empty."
Need General Policy
processing of applications
es a broad, general policy
ucational qualifications as
s the specific administrative
rs which may vary year to
the admissions officer said.
ie direction the admission
es will go depends on a series
her developments within the
rsity," Director of Admis-
Clyde Vroman said. "The
ion of our place in higher
tion will have to be answer-
ret. This in turn depends}
the needs of society."
ressures of freshmen ad-
)n applications are being met
ee ways, Prof. Vroman said,
naistive and alert adminis-

tration, capable faculty members,
and an admissions staff I feel is
second to none."
Focus on Record'
In handling a student's appli-
cation to become a University
freshman, representatives of the
admissions office focus their at-
tention first on the high school
academic record. "We look at the
grades earned," Groesbeck ex-
plained.
This achievement record is view-
as a straight grade point average,
but also as a comparative ranking
within the student's own high
school class. The stress on rank
in graduating class is born out
by 'the fact that 54 per cent of
the entering freshman class this
fall were in the upper tenth of
their high school classes. Pour
of five students in the class of
'64 were in the top fiftp.
An examination of the distribu-
tion. of high school ranks of last
year's freshmen, however, shows
that nearly 200 students graduated
in the lower 60 per cent of their
classes. "These students are not
star athletes who sneaked around
the regular requirements. Most
of them are graduates of crack
private schools where the middle
third of the class is ofte at the
same level as the top quarter of
a normal public high scho,"
Groesbeck said.
Exam Troubles
Similarly, a distribution of scores
on theCollege Board Scholastic
Aptitude Test-now required for
enrollment shows that three per
cent of the freshman scored below
400 on the verbal segment, while
two per cent made a parallel figure
in the mathematical section.
"These scores represent students
who have trouble taking this type
of exam and students who ranked
at the top of a less than best high
school."
The admisions office generally
considers a "B" high school aver-
age -as a minimum for admission
to the University. "Anything lower
is usually considered inadequate
backgroup for success here,"
Groesbeck said.
Special Demands
Each applicant is considered
first in relation to his chosen
field of studies and the demands
which such studies will make upon1
him. "In certain areas, such as
music, special kinds of prepara-
tion become imperative."
In addition to the high school
record and counselor's recomen-
dation, a whole series of admission
policies help or hinder the pros-
pective University student.
DIAL NO 5-6290
ENDS TONIGHT
SONG
fE:;:.

All qualified Michigan residents1
who submit their applications on
time and who appear prepared for
academic success are admitted, up
to the limit of the University's
facilities. "Our priority is to the
students in the state," Vroman
said.
Out of state students compose
one third of each freshman class
and about half of the applicants.
The 1,000 or so. non-Michigan
residents who admitted face "con-
siderable competition" from the
4,000 others who seek entrance.
Many out-of-state- applicants
receive an additional boost because
they are closely related to an
University alumnus. "We evaluate
these students on the same criteria
as the Michigan high school
senior," Groesbeck said.
"No Carte Blanche"
"It is not .a carte blanche for
admission. 'Close' relatives does
not extend beyond parents, grand-
parents, siblings, husbands or
wives. Each student must meet the
level expected of all freshman,"
he added.
University freshmen are expect-
ed to be at least 16 years old,
Groesbeck said, and they must
be graduates of an accredited high
school. "We have never experi-
mented with plans where a high
school student skips his senior
year and enters college after pass-
ing the 11th grade. We have found
that younger students have prob-
lems adjusting socially and emo-
tionally. As the requirement now
stands, we only have one or two
freshmen who aren't at least 17."
Course Requirements
In the area of specific course
requirements, the nine schools and
colleges that admit freshmen
("Students are not admitted to
the University itself, but to a
specific school within it") require
three years of high school English.:
Individual schools have varying
standards as to the number of
major and minor sequences and
science and mathematics, but each
insists on 15 units as a minimum.

Quad Houses:
Set Dinners
Hot Panel's
All the houses of South Quad-
rangle in conjunction with Inter-
national Week are planning a so-
cial and educational function with
international students, this week.
Huber House members invited
students from Kenya, Korea, Pak-
istan and Norway to have dinner
with them last night and then
held a panel discussion on "Amer-
ican Prestige.",
Students from 14 nations paired
up with Kelsey House students for
dinner and a general short dis-
cussion period. The students were
from Thailand, Indonesia, Paki-
stan, Greece, Latvia, Africa, Phil-
ippines, Russia, Korea, Lithuania,
Turkey, Venezuela, Israel and In-
dia.
Van Tyne House has invited
three Indian students to dinner
on Friday. They will also stage
a panel discussion on American
Prestige.
Gomberg House has decided to
concentrate. on the international
students living in the khouse and
they will dine with them on sev-
eral occasions.
The other five houses in South
Quad have planned similar social

LABORATORY PLAYBILL
TODAY 4:10 P.M. Department of S
THE MAIDS
by GENET
Trueblood Auditorium, Frieze Bldg.
No Admission Charge

gTA

ENDS SATURDAY
DIAL 2-6264

A NEW TRUE-UMF ADVENTURE FEATUE -
i 1#' " DI iE .,-en-
BING and WALT
tell the fabulous tale
of the Headiess
Horseman! la 11CROSBY
TECHNICOLOR * ,1nd g
A!-Cartoon Entertainment w
STARTS SUNDAY "SUNRISE AT CAMPOBELLO'

-Daily-Larry Vanice
PUGILISTS-This floating boxing ring, a hobby horse, and a.
Punch and Judy slapstick scene will all be on view tonight,
Friday and Saturday evenings at the Varsity Pool. The concept
that integrates these divergent objects into a total watery
community is the speech department's production of Aris-
tophanes' succinctly titled satire, "The Frogs." The fifth century
B.C. Greecian drama will be enlivened by allusions to modern
events around campus and on the political scene. It starts at
8:30 p.m.

functions.
LEAGUE PLAN-

International
Students Visit
Residences
The flavor of International
Week surrounds the dinner tables
of both sororities and independ-
ent houses this week as the resi-
dent women act as hostesses for
their international sisters.
"This was the first time I'd
seen a sorority," Giancarla Ver-j
atti, '61L, commented after her
visit to the Alpha Gamma Delta

8:00 TONIGHT SEE

Varsity Swimmers, Divers, Michifish and
Michifins, Dance Dept. Choreography
Workshop, Dept. of Speech U. Players in
A ARISTOPHAN ES' SPLASH I NG FARCE
THE .FROGS,

an te amount of time you
are pendin g reading this paper
ou could goand buy your
tickets for the
MIKADO
SON SALE Q
TODAY
at the
Adm. Building
} t~Nextwek at
' ... ' ydiad'Mendelssohn
box office
The Gilbert and Sullivan Society
-9 c-o->< >--><-o > <-o

DIAL NO 1-6416

ome Bac
AFRICA
:RIDAY AND SATURDAY

fim"

The University also operates a house Tuesday night.
program of advanced placement Twenty-six women's houses on
credit for college level courses camus have adopted foreign stu-
taken in high school. "The num- dents under the international Sis-
ber of students who have received ter Program sponsored by the
credit for such work has been Women's League. Last spring the
doubling every year since we League worked through Panhel
started the program," Groesbeck and Assembly to recruit "interna-
said. tional" representatives for each
Administrative Dean Robert Wil-house. The units were then asked
liamns summed up one of the ad- if they wanted to adopt a"s-
missions officer's problems. "He ter" and if they preferred a wom-
gets no credit from anyone. If he an from any particular country.
rejects a student his father calls

VARSITY SWIMMING POOL
Corner Hoover & Stdte

$1.25

Tickets 10-5 Mendelssohn Theatre
6-8 Varsity Pool

QF

SEX, SIN,
SEDUCTION
AND
SORCERY!,
- "*

N-PAUL SARTRE'S adaptation
of ARTHUR MILLER'S
MONE SIGNORET-WES MONTAND
MYLENE DEMONGEOT

J, GJ~i~w a o~uu - , - . av
him a 'dumb cluck' of the Univer-I
sity. If he accepts the boy, it was
something his family and school
naturally expected."
Groesbeck stressed his pride in
the independence from personal;
control the admissions office has.
"We can do what we thing is right.
There is no pressure to conform to
the theory that we should stack
the University with academically
unqualified athletes or close rela-'
itves of influential persons."
Playbill To Bring
'The Maids' Here
The third laboratory playbill,
"The Maids" will be presented at
4:10 p.m. today in Trueblood Aud.I
"The Maids," by the contem-
porary French writer, Jean Genet,
is a study of the love, hate and
jealousy between two maiden sis-
ters and their employer.
HAY RIDES
PIZZAS RIDES
I Riding Daily
SUSTERKA LAKE
RIDING STABLE
50665 Huron River Dr.
Bellevelle, HUnter 3-5010

More Joining
"More are joining the program
all the time," Betty Brandt. '62, I
chairman of the International
committee said. "Since this week
is International Week we've en-
couraged the houses to invite over
their "sisters" and her friends.
Miss Veratti, studying under a
Ford Foundation fellowship, has
only been in this country since
September. A native of Milan,
Italy, she noted that, "I am the
only Italian student on the Uni-
versity campus, and most of the
Americans I meet are in my
classes." Her visit. to Alpha Gam-
ma Delta was the first social con-
tact she has had with a non-for-
eign group.
International Representative
Lore'tta Kulczak, '63, is the in-
ternational representative at the
sorority. "We all enjoyed having
Giancarla with us, and I know
that many of us will get together
with her for coffee dates," she
said. "She is welcome to come to
the house at any time and we
hope that she will work on Spring
Weekend with us."
"We hope that through this
plan the internationalhstudent will
see how the women live on cam-
pus and will build up a friendship
with a particular group," Miss
Brandt noted, "through sharing
both fun and problems we can
come closer to the foreign stu-
dent."

I

It

-I

FILM OF THE MONTH
AND
N.Y. CRITICS AWARD E
DON'T MISS IT! j
FRIDAY
DORIS DAY
REX HARRISON
JOHN GAVIN
in
"MIDNIGHT LACE"

11

I

' I

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE

5 {

presents
JOHN VAN DRUTEN'S

HILARIOUS COMEDY!

A

directed by
BILL TAYLOR
TONIGHT.

BELL,
BOOK,

.. 1.50

FRI. & SAT. ...

1.75

8 P.M.

wALin

,, l ,lt'" ll lea R 10

i

III

II

M

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