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November 03, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-03

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TEHSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1980 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
* - BOYCOTT ENDS: CUBANS AWAIT 'INVASION':
(ennedy Asks Formation students U.S. Na Mines Gu
U** AY ies1

Of World

'Peace Corps'

I I

POLITICS:
World Eyes
American
Campaign
LONDON (W- - People around
the world are watching the Amer-
ican election campaign for any
changes in United States policy
that will affect them.
Newspapers in Western Europe,
while not choosing sides for the
most part, generally assume Sen.
John F. Kennedy is pulling com-
fortably ahead in the race.
Many television viewers have
seen rebroadcasts of the Nixon-
Kennedy debates, which served to
stimulate interest. The debates
were presented in Britain, West
Germany, Argentina and Japan-
where "Nikuson" and "Kenedei"
spoke in dubbed Japanese.
In Asia, newspaper readers and
television viewers are getting
heavy doses of United States poli-
tics and city people display con-
siderable interest.
But among the great masses of
Asians, concerned in many cases
with the problem of getting
enough to eat, there is no over-
riding interest in the campaign.
In Britain, America's closest al-
ly, officials are viewing the race
with silent concern. They feel that
London's special relationship with
Washington is bound to change"
no matter who wins.

JOHN F. KENNEDY
... asks peace corps

RICHARD M. NIXON
... backed by Ike

Ike Cites U.S. Power,
Calls for Nixon Victory

NEW YORK (MP - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower called last
night for the election of Vice-
President Richard M. Nixon and
Henry Cabot Lodge as men of ma-
turity, proven experience and de-
cision.
At the same time, Eisenhower
slapped indirectly at Sen. John
E. Kennedy, the Democratic pres-
idential nominee. He did so in
saying that during the years of
the present administration the na-
tion's domestic economy "has be-"

Challenge Colloquium
NOVEMBER 18-20
Speakers:
HENRY STEELE COMMAGER
JUSTICE TALBOT SMITH
MICHAEL HARRI NGTON
NORMAN THOMAS

come immeasurably, stronger,"
and the years "have been the
brightest in our history."
In another obvious dig at Ken-
nedy, Eisenhower said he can't
understand "how, in the face of
the record, anyone can seriously
contend that the world leadership
of the United States has been
impaired."
"Mighty Power"
Eisenhower called America "the
mightiest temporal power that has
ever been developed on God's foot-
stool."
In reference to Kennedy's
charge that America's prestige
abroad has fallen during the ad-
ministration, the President said
hundreds of thousands of persons
each year risk their lives to defect
fromCommunist-controlled states.
He added:
"There is no question in their
minds about American prestige."
Tandem Campaign
Campaigning in tandem with
Nixon, the man he wants to suc-
ceed him, Eisenhower during the
day addressed three rallies in
Manhattan and in nearby Nassau
and Westchester counties. At each
place, the President plugged hard
before big crowds for election of
Nixon and his running mate.
A high point of the day was a
parade from the Wall Street area
up to the heart of Manhattan in
sparkling sunshine, a motorcade
given an enthusiastic reception by
hundreds of thousands jamming
the streets.
CAIF E
PROMETHEAN
508 E. William
TONITE AT 9:00
Charlie Brown
Reads Poetry

To Replace
Military Duty
For Youths
Service To Give Aid
To Emerging Nations
SAN FRANCISCO (I) -- Sen.
John F. Kennedy proposed last
night the establishment of a
peace corps in which young men
could serve in underdeveloped na-
tions for three years instead of
being drafted for military duty.
Warning that "the enemy ad-
vances now by non-military meth-
ods," the Democratic presidential
candidate said this country must
have representatives abroad of
greater talent and training, espe-
cially in the newly-emerging na-
tions that need specialized help
"We can push a button to start
the next war but there is no
push-button magic to bring a just
and lasting peace," Kennedy said
in a speech prepared for delivery
at the Cow Palace,
California Campaign
The talk marked the windup of
Kennedy's final two-day bid for
the 32 electoral votes of Califor-
nia, home state of his Republican
opponent, Vice-President Richard
M. Nixon.
Earlier, Kennedy accused the
administration of using national
defense funds for political ends
and pledged, if elected, to push
for speedy action on measures to
raise educational standards.
In his speech here, Kennedy
proposed that present efforts to
aid underdeveloped areas of the
world would be supplemented by
a corps of "talented young men
willing and able to serve in coun-
tries in this fashion for three
years as an alternative to peace-
time selective service."
open to Women
He said the corps would be
open to women as well as men
and. that all its members would
be well qualified through rigor-
ous standards and well trained in
the language, skills and customs
they would need to know.
"We cannot discontinue train-
ing our young men as soldiers of
war," he said. "But we also need
them as 'ambassadors of peace.'
Kennedy said this would be a
voluntary corps drawn from every
race and walk of life from among
young people "eager to serve the
cause of peace in the most useful
way."
Asks Dedication
"I am convinced," Kennedy
said, "that our young men and
women, dedicated to freedom, are
fully capable of overcoming the
efforts of Mr. Khrushchev's mis-
sionaries, who are dedicated to
undermining that freedom."
The Senator said these proposals
offered no quick and easy solu-
tion to the problems of peace but
he called them "essential tools."
In a statement released in Los
Angeles before flying to San Di-
ego, San Jose and San Francisco,
Kennedy called money released
for the B-70 program, use of- de-
fense funds for political purposes.
Mitropoulos
Dies In Milan

r

U

GRAD. SOCIAL HOUR

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 1960
314 East Liberty
PRESENTED BY
THE GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL

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- - - - - owspeop

..:..

YOU HAVE ONLY 2 MORE DAYS

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t

to get Tickets for

I

COMBINED GLEE CLUB
CONCERTS
FRIDAY, Nov. 4
SATURDAY, Nov. 5
8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM

MILAN, Italy OMP-- Dimitri
Mitropoulos, an austere musical
perfectionist who conducted or-
chestras in the United States for
many years, toppled from the
podium at La Scala opera house
yesterday and died.
Mitropoulos was rehearsing Gus-
tav Mahler's 3rd Symphony for a
concert here Monday. A few
minutes before taking up his
baton, he had complained of being
tired.
Mitropoulos, born in Greece 64
years ago, had spent 10-year ten-
uares as conductor of the Min-
neapolis symphony and then the
New York Philharmonic. Later he
conducted at New York's Metro-
politan opera and toured exten-
sively in Europe.

i

Tickets Available at Ad. Building Box Office

I

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......

s.G Cinema rj'uid
TONIGHT and Friday at 7 and 9 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT Ingmar Bergmann 's
LEW AYRES LOUIS WOLHEIM THE SEVENTH SEAL
SI AA IIAAMFVII F

Portrait of a Candidate

I I

11 1: FU rT UnA d AYMJ~

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