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October 30, 1960 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBI

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTOB:

Glee Clubs Pianist To Present Concerts'

Joint Group
To Prepare
Rush Study
By PAT GOLDEN
Panhellenic and Assembly Asso-
ciations will work together this
year to improve rush procedures,
Panhel President Barbara Green-
berg, '61, has announced.
Panhel's rush study committee
will accept suggestions from As-
sembly and from Junior Panhel's
rush study committee.
This group will submit a final
report Dec. 12 on its findings in
the areas of academic stress,
calendaring problems, contact
rules, other rush systems, con-
centration of the rush period and
rush tensions.
The standing rush committee,
composed of Miss Greenberg, As-
sistant Dean of Women Elizabeth
LAslie, Panhel's assistant rush
counselor chairman and the social
directors of the Women's League,
will then consider the report.
They will meet with an Assem-
bly committee composed of Assis-
tant Dean of Women Elsie Fuller,
Nancy French, '61, Stockwell Hall
house director Majorie McCoy,
and Judith Bennett, '61, honor
resident in Victor Vaughan House.
After agreeing on several ac-
ceptable plans, the joint com-
mittee will offer its proposals to
the rush chairman of each sorority
and to the Assembly Executive
Board.
They will be considered by the
sorority houses, then come for
final approval before the rush
chairmen and Assembly Dormi-
tory Council representatives.
Panhel will place the resulting
proposal before Student Govern-
ment Council for calendaring in
February or March.
Assembly President Myra Goines,
'61, commented that "last year's
plan was defeated at SGC because
Assembly did not have enough
time .to consider it before it was
brought to the Council.
"I think we have prevented a
recurrence of that situation by
setting up committees to work
together throughout the planning
stages.

ARTS AND LETTERS:C
Heath-Stubbs Says Poetry, Culture Fail

By JUDITH SATTLER
The failure of modern poetry is
only a part ofj the greater failure
of Western culture, Prof. John
Heath-Stubbs, visiting poet in the
English department, claimed.
Proff Heath-Stubbs discussed
various avenues which have failed
to provide anything significant
in modern culture.
Poetry has become a merely
personal form in the last ten
years, he said, because poets either
will not or cannot deal with the
human situation in a wider scope.
But, "poetry must be difficult," he
said, "to write simple poems is"
not the function of poetry in the
present situation."
One reason for this refuge in

plexity of modern life, he said.
"The departmentalization of,
knowledge leaves everyone in his
own void."
Pervasive specialization makes
poetry difficult, because poetry is
"the last refuge of a universally
comprehensible language!'
A belief In the relevance of his-
tory to our situation has disap-
peared in modern times, he said,
because "many people believe that
our situation is different from any
previous one.
Atomic Power
People had not-caught up with
the industrial revolution - al-
though some, like Eliot, were be-
ginning to-when the second re-
volution came with the invention
of atomic power, which Prof.
Heath-Stubbs sees as the inevit-
able result of the scientific
method.
"Atomic power is an enormous
moral shock, in its potential for
destruction in war, or for social
change in peace. It is "too big
to deal with," he noted. But "the
bomb can become an alibi for not
thinking about other problems, an
easy, emotional way out." And,
there are other problems.
The popular culture of our time
is a "mass pseudo-culture," he
said, "a classless, international
culture built around the lowest
common denominator.

the personal

is the great com-I

Panel To Talk
About Castro
"The Impact of Fidel Castro
on Latin America" will be the
topic of an open panel discussion
at 8 p.m. today at the Newman
Club.
Prof. Edward Stasheff of the
speech department will moderate
the panel of four Latin American
students. The forum is part of
International Week.

Poetry has its own particular
sickness in our world. The modern
association of poetry with the
academic world and with analyti-
cal criticism is a disadvantage, he
said.
"Once bitten by criticism, one
can't escape' and "an overly ana-
lytical attitude" towards poetry
develops.
Artificial Symbolism
If one knows about symbolism
in poetry, which was originally
used unself-consciously, one may
try to arrange symbols in his own
work. Such consciots effort is
artificial and tends to stifle any
spontaneity, he said,
Where is poetry going then?
"Some think poetry will be
superseded by prose," he said; "I
can't prophesy, but there is always
a place for poetry, always a use
for the poetic form of expression,
which prose can't carry out."
Regents Form
Award Group
The Regents Thursday approv-
ed a plan for the administration
of the Glenn MacDonald Scholar-
ships in journalism.
The recipients of these awards,
established in 1958 in honor of
the late editor of the Bay City
Times, will be chosen by a com-
mittee consisting of Mrs. Glenn
MacDonald, George P. McCallum,
Ann Arbor News manager; Fran-
cis H. Letchfield, Wesley H.
Maurer, chairman of the jourial-
ism department, and one other
journalism department faculty
member.
DIAL NO 5-6290
TODAY
whose Io" were as
temptupus
as his
~r.uaicht

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Indiana Disciplines Students
Over Charges of Gambling

I

Organization
Notices

AI

you will prevent
THE GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
from committing honorable hari-kari
if you buy tickets for the
November 10th, 11th, and 12th
'a 4 a
TICKET PRICES:
Thursday, Nov. 10 ... $1.25
Friday, Nov.11 . '. $1.75
Saturday, Nov. 12 $1.75
Saturday, Nov.:12 . Adults $1.00
(matinee) .. ..Children .50
On sale Tuesday, Nov. 1 through
Thursday, Nov. 3 at the Adminis-
tration Building, and Monday, Nov.
7 through Saturday, Nov. 12, at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office.
ri Mail orders accepted if sent to:

Cong. Disc. E & R stud. Guild, Hal-
lowe'en Party in costume, Oct. 30, 7
p.m., Memorial Christian Church, Grad.
group, G. Bursley, Oct. 31, 8 p.m., 524
Thompson.
. . ,
Gamma Delta, Luth. Stud. Club,
Supper, explanation of the history and
significance of the Lutheran Confes-
atonal Books, Oct. 30, 8 p.m., 1511'
Wagshtenaw.
.illel Fdn., Hungry people are wel-
come to eat at Supper Club, Oct. 30,
6 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Oct.
31, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. Cafe y conver-
saclon.
r r
Wesley Fdn., Reformation Day Serv-
ie" at Ist Presby. Church, Oct. 30, 8
p.m., 1432 Washtenaw. Speaker: Dr. H.
Bosley, Methodist minister, "Needed: A
New Reformation."
o . .
Young Friends, Supper & discussion
of program for the semester, Oct. 30,
8 p.m., Friends Center.
. . .,
TUllr Ski Club, First General Meeting
-Discussion of Skiing Plans, Film and
Refreshments, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m., Union,
3rd Fl. Conf. Rm.
Am. Rocket Soc,, Meeting, Nov. 21,
7:30 p.m., 2084 E. Eng, Bldg. Speaker:
Dr. W. G. Melbourne, Jet Propulsion
Lab., "Advanced Propulsion Systems
for Interplanetary Flight."
Intern. Folk Dancers, Meeting. Datrc-
ing, Nov. 1, 7 p.m., Intern. Center.
!Newman Club, Panel on Cuba "The
Impact of Fidel Castro on Latin Amer-
lea," Oct. 30, 8 p.m., 331 Thompson.

By JEROME WEINSTEIN
BLOOMINGTON-Four Indiana
University students have been
placed on disciplinary probation
by the dean of students' office as
a result of their alleged partici-
pation in a football lottery.
Bloomington police reported
that the football pool cards were
printed by a Richmond commer-
cial printer and then sent to
Bloomington to be sold by the
students. The cards offered in-
creasing odds to a better who
could pick three or more col-
legiate football game winners
within a specified point spread.
This is the second Big Ten
school to report football lotteries
recently; Ohio State University
last week had discovered a betting
ring operating on its campus.
, * *
MADISON-The new voluntary
military training (ROTC) pro-
gram at the University of Wis-
consin seems assured of success
according to figures released by
the student paper, The Daily
Cardinal.
A total of 388 freshmen on the
Madison campus signed up to
continue with the Army ROTC
after the completion of the five-
week orientation period.
This figure is well over the
total required by the faculty-
regent ruling of last year, which
stated that the ROTC program
would revert automatically to a
compulsory basis if the number
of students entering the third
year Army ROTC programs didn't
meet a minimal requiremen.
ROTC at Wisconsin had for-
merly been compulsory for all
male students; only this year has
the new program been put into
effect.
The Michigan State University
Trustees Just last year turned
down a proposal to make ROTC
voluntary, thus continuing com-
pulsory training there.
* * *
IOWA CITY - A, panel dis-
cussion on cheating at the State
University of Iowa urged the

Interfraternity Council and Pan-
hellenic Council, to take a firm
stand on the problem and to take
action against it.
Prof. H. W. Saunders of the
sociology department at Iowa
State cited a study which said
that nearly 40 per cent of the
respondents to a study of 11 col-
leges admitted. to having cheated
at some time and cheating is more
prevalent among fraternityT mem-
bers than among independents
Prof. Saunders wondered how
much advantage the fraternity or
sorority members, who have ad-
vantage to well-stocked files of
old tests and papers, have over
the non-affiliates.
Dewey B. Stuit dean of the
liberal arts college suggested that
fraternities and sororities should
allow the administration to ex-
amine their files and throw out
any tests which were obtained
illegally.
Stuit added that for fraternities
and sororities to accept the re-
sponsibility to change student at-
titude toward cheating would be
a much better goal than striving
to maintain high scholastic stand-
ing among their members.
t
Approve Action
On 'U' Patents
The Regents Thursday author-
ized Vice-President in charge of
Business and Finance Wilbur K.
Pierpont to enter into a patent
agreement with the Michigan Re-
search Foundation.
The Foundation is a non-profit
corporation made up of University
alumni and faculty and was
founded to "promote, encourage,
maintain and aid scientific in-
vestigation and research at the
University."
It has offered to serve by aid-
ing in the prosecution and exploi-
tation of patents for the Univer-
sity.

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- EXTRA
BUGS BUNNY CARTOON
Note Time Schedule
Shows at 1:00-3:30-6:10-8:50
Feature at 1:20-3:50-6:30-9:10

..........

Owl

'III

DIAL NO2-6264
-Still plenty of choice seats avail-
able for both performances today.
Hurry! Buy them now."

THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
presents the
SOLISTI DI ZAGREB
in RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

& NAW A ' MaLIFIE
e. u
SOURAMI"E
IMP

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11

4t

w
.* a

COOP
ey

SUN. MATINEE & AVE $1.75
MATINEE AT 2:00 P.M.E EE AT 8:00 P.M.

STARTING MONDAY

*

PROGRAM:
Sinfonia in C Major........................ .Vivaldi
Concerto in E major for violin and strings. ..,.....Vivaldi
Soloist: JEKKA STANC
' . ___r - 1_. ._,. 1....11.I ... tt;..c 1//LO~ ยข

'.~u -"1'! I mI UI f (o7 M r. r -uuu; *

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