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October 26, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICICAN DAILY

uling
Hours.

i

QUANTUM MECHANICS:
Debye Relates History of Theory

In Marle
Mary Markley Council, voted
Monday night to abolish the 10:30
p.m. Wednesday night closing.
The dormitory will now have
the same closing hours on Wed-
nesday as on other week nights,
11 pm. for' freshmen and mid-
night for upperclassmen. The
rule will go into effect beginning
Nov. 2.
On, the first Wednesday of
every month the dormitory will
close at 11 p.m.a.This will affect
all residents except those in Bar-
bara Little House, Markley's up-
perclass house. Houses may hold
meetings at this time if they so
desire.
Any additional house or corri-
dor meetings may be scheduled at
any time by the individual units.

"The quantum theory is an ex-
cellent example of an apparently
illogical explanation developing
into a good theory." Prof. Emeri-
tus Peter J. Debye, of Cornell
University, former winner of the
Nobel Prize for Chemistry, said
yesterday.
Prof. Debye, speaking to a capa-
city crowd at a meeting of the
University Student Affiliate of the
American Chemical Society, traced
the history of the quantum theory
from the work of Max Planck in
1900 to that of Erwin Schrodinger
in the 1930's,
Planck, working with "black
bodies" or those which absorb all
radiation, suggested that radia-.]
Lion is both emitted and absorbed
in units of magnitude proportional
to the frequency.
This idea was a departure from
the classical. mechanics of Lnd-
wig Boltzman and others who be-

lieved that a particle emits radia-
tion continuously.
Niels Bohr, working in 1913,
"extended the quantum concepts
of Planck to the problem of the
structure of the atom by postulat-
ing that electrons, when traveling
about an atom's nucleus, main-
tain a 'stable orbit without loss
of energy,," said Debye..
Arnold Summerfield, soon after
Bohr, was able to place the elee-
trons in their geometrical orbits
around the nucleus of the atom.
In response to questions on the
work of Einstein, Prof. Debye ex-
plained that Einstein continued'
to hold the belief that quantum
theory was merely an extension
of classical mechanics rather than
a revolutionary new idea.
Prof. Debye, whose visits are
being sponsored by the Institute of
Science and Technoiogy, will con-

tinue his stay at the University
through December. He will be
available for consultation with
students or faculty.
Debates Set
At Hyde Park
Students may express their'
opinions on any issue at the tra-
ditional Hyde Park from 3 to
5 p.m. tomorrow on the daig.
Chairman Susani Kreisler, '61,
said that the event is open to
the entire campus.
Sponsored by the Women's
League, Hyde Park will take place
12 days before the national and
campus elections, and on the day,
Vice-President Richard M. Nixon
visits Ann Arbor..

Unt To Sell
Books, Help
Study Fund
Used books of all types will go
on sale Friday and Saturday at
the annual American Association
of University Women's book sale
at the International Center.
This is the main fund-raising
project of the local chapter, and
the proceeds go to the organiza-
tion's international study grant
and fellowship fund. American
women and women from abroad
who are doing post-graduate study
or research receiye the grants.
The books are donated by mem-
bers of the local branch of AAUW
and by townspeople.
Books will be on sale. at the
International Center from 1 to
9 p.m. Friday and from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.

,i

* THE FOLK ARTS FESTIVAL *

DAILY-OFIIL ULEI

11

JOSH WHITE'
THE WEAVERS
ODETTA . . .
PETE SEEGER.

. . OCT. 29
F FEB. 25
. MAR. 24
. . APR 24

Tickets now on sale at FOLLETT'S and ULRICH'S
for JOSH WHITE. Save your ticket stubs for a 25c
discount on The Weavers, Odetta, and Pete Seeger.

H

Student Government Council
announces
PETITIONING
for
~POSITIONS
Petition and information available
at 3011 S.A.B.
or Main Floor Student Offices
S.G.C.

(Continued from Page 4)
LL Hall. All interested students are invited
to attend.
Doctoral Examination for Charles In-
thony Salotti, Mineralogy: thesis: "Geol-
ogy and Petrology of the, Cotapaxi-How-
ard Area, Fremont County, Colorado,"
Wed., Oct. 26, 4065 Natural Science
Bldg., at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, E. W.
Heinrich.
Events Thursday
On Thursday; Oct. 27 at 4:10 pm. the
departnjent of Speech will present
George Buchnar's Leonce and Lena, an
existentialist farce, in the Arena The-
atre, Frieze Building. Admission will
be free.
Dr. William L. Root of the Lincoln
Laboratories, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, will speak on "The Detec-
tion of Radar Echoes in Noise" on
Thurs., Oct. 27 at 4 p.m. In Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
Department of Chemistry Werner E.
Bachmann Memorial Lecture: "Penicil-
lin Syntheses" presented by Prof. John
C. Sheehan, Department of Chemistry,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Thurs., Oct. 27, at 4 p.m. Rm. 1400,
Chemistry Bldg.
M. 301. Analysis Seminar. Prof. J. L.
Ullman will speak on "Approximation
Theory in the Complex Plane by Ortho-
gonal Polynomials" on Thurs., Oct. 27
in Rm. 246 West Engineering at 2 p.m.
Challenge Civil Liberties Seminar:
Thomas S. Parsons of the School of
Education will lead a discussion. Thurs,
Oct. 27 at 7:00 in the Wenley Lounge,4
West Quad on "The Challenge of Ac-
cepring Civic Responsibility." The
public is welcome.y
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
0. Minty will speak on "Monotone
Networks" Thurs., Oct. 27, at 4 p.m. in1
Rm. 246 West Engineering. Refresh-:
ments will be served at 3:30 p.m. ini
Rm. 274 W. Eng,
Greeting Cards
Fountain Pens,
Stationery
Office Supplies'-
Typewriters
STEEL DESKS -
CHAIRS, FILES
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone NO 3-2481

Political Science Round Table: James
H. Meisel, Prof. of Political Science, will
Sspeak on "Conspiracy of the Intellectu-
als" on Thurs., Oct. 27 at 8 p~m. in the
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Communication Sciences Colloqu'ium:
Dr. Bert F. Green, Jr. of the Lincoln
Laboratory of the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology will speak on "Base-
ball-An Automatic Question-Answerer"
at 4 p.m. Thurs.,* Oct. 27E in Rn. 2402,
Mason Hall.
Challenge Seminar: Kappa Delta, 1620
Cambridge. Thurs., Oct. 27-8:30 p.m.
"Foreign Perception of American Civil
Liberties." Ingo Seidler, German Dept.
A. C. Jefferson, History Dept.
Doctoral Examination for Jordan How
ard Sobel, Philosophy; thesis: "What if
Everyone Did That?" Thurs., Oct. 27,
2218 Angell Hail, at 4:30 p.m. Chair-
man, R. L. Cartwright.
Doctoral Examination for Ralph Mat-
thew Perhac, Geology; thesis: "Geology
and Mineral Deposits of the Gallinas
Mountains, New Mexico," Thurs., Oct.
27, 4065 Natural Science Bldg., at 2:00
p.m. Chairman, E. W. Heinrich.
Doctoral Examination for T, David;
Prins, Speech; thesis: "An analysis
of Articularly Deviations in Children be-
tween Three and Seven Years of Age
and Their Relation to Motor and Audi-
tory Test Performances," Thurs., Oct.
27, 301 Speech Clinic, at 10:00 a.m.,
Chairman, D. E. Morley.
Placement Notices
PLACEMENT INTERVIEW: ATTEN.
SENIORS & GRAD STUDENTS-
NOTE: W. F. Hewitt' General Personnel
manager, Hardware Mutuals, will be on!
campus to interview men with any de-
gree for Insurance Claims Adjuster,
Underwriting, Correspondent and Sales
Programs, Wed, and Thurs., Oct. 26 and
27, for work in Michigan. These pro-
groms will lead to senior technical or
management positions. For appoint-
ment or information, contact the Bu-
reau of Appointments, ext. 3371 or 509.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:,
Wilson & Co., Inc., Chicago, JII.-Op-
portunity for Biochemist, PhD degree,
with several years academic or indus-
trial experience to assist Res. Director.
Man preferred, will consider woman.
Detroit Agency seeking highly quali-
fied Chemist's (3): Physical, Organic &
Electro, for Research & Development1

in solid fuel industry for client Ac-
cessory Mfg. firm, Must be U.S. citi-
zens, 3 to 10 yrs. experience. Imumedi-
ate openings.
Management Consulting Firmin the
East seeking highly qualified engineer-
egne-ing graduates for the following posi-
tions: Purchas. Director, General Su-
perintendent, and Gen. Construction
Manager for client construcion firm.
1015 yr. pertinent experience,
Grand Rapids, Civil Service Planning
Technician desired for drafting work
in connection with community plan-
ning. College graduate with. major in
city planning, pub. admin,, architec-
tore, or landscape architecture. Appli-
cations accepted until Nov. 4, 1960.
'Detroit Civil Service-Contact Bureau
of Appointments for current listing of
openings for which examinations will
be held until further notice: Account-
ing, economics, city planning, engineer-
ing, medical, social work, recreation,
etc. Interviewer will be on campus Nov.
9.
Please contact Bureau of Appoint-
ments, Rm. 4021, Admin. Bldg., Ext.
3371 for further details.
Student Part-Time
Em~ployment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Non-Academic Per-
sonnel Office, 1020 Admin. Bldg., dur-
ing the following hours: Monday
through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring part-
time employees should contact Bill
Wenrich at NO 3-1511 ext. 2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Room 1020, daily.
MALE
1-Computor operator (mornings,
Monday-Friday).
2-Snack-bar helpers (Saturdays, from
# 10 p.m.-1 a.m., and 10 a.m.-1 p.m.).
3-Porters (4-10 p.m. Monday-Friday,
split hours).
3-Men to load and unload boxes of
books (Friday morn., Oct. 28).
1-Married couple to do light work,
in exchange for room and board.
1-Room in exchange for light work,
and part payment.
2-Experienced clothing salesmen (1-5
p.m. Monday-Friday),
1-Bellboy-Busboy (Wednesday, Thurs-
day, & Friday, 3-11 p.m.).
2-Waiters (mean and evening hours).
3--Meal jobs.
18--Psychological subjects, hours to be
arranged.
3-Salesmen - graduate students pre-
ferred, commission basis.)
FEMALE
2-Rooms in exchange for light house-
work.
1-Girl to live in 2-3 weeks, light
housework and care for children.
1-Experienced bookkeeper (after-
noons).
3-Waitresses (5-8 pm, and week-
ends).
1-Married couple to do light work
in exchange for room and board.
1-Laundry helper (4-6 p.m. Monday-
Friday).

III

WORLD'S
FAIR

Union

Oct. 29-29

-

Il__... _ T .._ _ . __

TO INTERVIEW GRADUATES AND GRADUATING
SENIORS WITH THESE DEGREES:
B.S. * M.S. * Ph.D:

E.E.

0 M.E. * A.E.

* PHYSICS

" MATH

Engineers and scientists who have or
will achieve.M.., Professional or Doctor's
degrees by January or June of 1961 are
invited to ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
with Mr. C. C. LaVene, Staff Assistant
to Vice-President Engineering of the
DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY on

FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN:

ELECTRONICS
COMPUTERS
INSTRUMENTATION
COMMUNICATIONS

ELECTROMECHANICS
AUTOMATION AND CONTROLS
SOLID STATE PHYSiCS
PROPULON CONTROLS

ULIASONICS
NUCLIONIcS
COMBUSTION
RADAR

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
HYDRAULICS
METALLURGY
STRUCTURES

See your Placement Director about a Bendix interview., H you ore unable to arrango this, write for firh details on
Bendix career opportunities. Address: Mr. C. D. Cleveland, The Bendix Corporation, Fisher Building, Detroit 2, Mich
November 2,3
ENGINEERS- MATH EMATICIANS * PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS

Oct. 31, Nov.

1

America's most exciting space and defense proj-
ects, including SATURN, SKYBOLT and
MISSILEER--and others of like importance-
have created outstanding long range opportuni-
ties at Douglas in the following fields:

Electrical
Electronics
Mechanical
Chemical
Aeronautical
Metallurgical

Welding
Engineering Mechanics
Physics
Mathematics
Astronomy
Astro-Physics

Openings exist at Douglas locations in Santa
Monica and El Segundo, California and Char-
lotte, North Carolina.
If you are a U.S. citizen who will earn a
qualifying de'gree, please contact your place-

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