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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1960 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH ,= IIfGA

es Shown in Basic Suits

By RICHARD OSTLING
Men's suits this season will
represent a wide variety within
a small/range. Some four or five
types are considered basic, and of
these, the conventional three but-
ton model with the flap pockets
and center vent is once again a
certain favorite.
However, prominent 'a m o n g
those making headway in the field
is the so-called natural shoulder,
traditional group with little or no
shoulder padding, flap pockets,
center vent, and, in increasing
number, with matching vest.
While the continental does not
dominate the scene, it's influence
is certainly felt. Suit coats are a
bit shorter, front slightly more
rounded, and more two button
models are shown. Clover leaf la-
pels, rounded lapels, lapels that
look like a shawl collar except for
a slit, and actual shawl collars as
well as baby and regular notches
indicate the scope of just one de-
tail of today's suits.
Four Major Types
The concentration this season
seems to be on four major types.
One is the average suit, a three
button affair with flap pockets,
center vent, and notched lapel. It
has a bit more shoulder expres-
sion and hangs a bit straighter
than last year.
Two models are provided for the
young and not so young who want
to feel ivy league. (That's aside
from those at Harvard, who've got
the ivy league feel anyway.) One
copmrises the natural shoulder
with the well-known ivy features
including pleatless, narrow trous-
ers.
The other is for the mature
man who wants to follow tradi-
tional lines. It is modeled along
the same pattern.
Diplomat Model
The fourth group lumps togeth-
er the many variations of the con-
tinental. It might well be classed
as the Diplomat's model, for many
of those appearing in public life
favor it.
Olive blends, burnished tones,
various grays, and black, with of
course, the ever popular blues,
comprise the color range. How-
ever, many of the suitings of one
tones are distinguished by soft
weaves, twisting or compounding
of colors, and undertones of
gleaming threasd. Subdued glen
plaids are slated for importance,
and nailhead and sharkskin weaves
feature some of the fine, import-
ed suiting.
Dacron-wool blends for fall-
winter wear continue to gain in
number, and they are available in
a wide color range.
Moderate Colors
Colors still run to moderation.
The radical new "grape" has not
caught on extensively in suits.
Nfving away from the navy and
charcoal hues, modern shades are
neither light nor dark.
As shades have become lighter,
so have the fabrics. In contrast to
the shaggy weaves of last fall,
many hard finishes are being
shown-and sold. Some winter
suits are coming in close to spring
weight.
Checks are coming back very
strong, and plaids and tartans are
beginning to show some strength.
In semi-formal dress wear, the
corduroy suit, normally worn with
a vest, has achieved great pop-
ularity for its economy and cas-
ual good style. Vests are. now be-
ing sold with over half the suits
on the college market,

RESURGENCE:
Footwear
Influenced
By British
By JEROME WEINSTEIN
Men's 'footwear in the United
States is- seeing a resurgence of
the British influence this fall.
Three characteristics are in in-
creaging demand. One is the high
riser, which covers more of the
instep than does the normal shoe,
whether laced or slip-on. Another
is a somewhat heavier shoe than
the very thin-soled imports or
copies. The third is the wing-tip,
including new takeoffs and inter-
pretations.
Also of some consequence this
season is the "roamer," a one-
piece loafer which is slowly re-
placing the traditional "penny-
insert" loafers, a most popular
shoe in the last few years.
Black remains the favorite color
in loafers, whether roamer or
penny-type, ) but various browns
and tans are now on the rise.
Two or three eyelet, plain-toed
shoes, along with the dress loafer,
are generally considered "in style"
for dresswear this season, while
the plain-tip cordovan, in the
same field, is, as usual, always
popular, ~
Suedes, Bucks
Suedes and "bucks" appear to be
on the way out. Each season
brings less demand for their re-
spective styles.
Retailers are noting a greater
demand for laced shoes. Having
been almost submerged under
the trend to loafers and slip-ons,
lace shoes are now making a
comeback The number of eyelets
are also on the rise, going up from
four to five. This prompts the
return of the high tongue, causing
the shoes to now lace higher. Loaf-
ers are also setting a higher effect
with high tongues and tighter
elastic collars. This indicates a
rising interest in shoes that ride
higher on the foot and give greater
support.
Heavier soles are also on the
increase, but the trend is not to
a double sole. The growing de-
mand comesfrom those who work
on th eir feet for a greater part of
the day, and from college students
who do a great amount of walking.
They find that shoes with fewer
eyelets, and thus less support, are
not quite as comfortable.
High Risers
The high risers are particularly
recommended for use with cuffless
trousers and other continental
styes, for they offset the thin
effect created by the absence of
the cuff,
However, the trend to heavy
duty footwear will not bring the
cumbersome look. In fact, they
will appear as slim and trim as
their summer counterparts. Much
of the trimness has been accom-
plished by the refinement of de-
tails such as perforations and par-
ing down of sole sides. Neater up-
per patterns also help create the
effect.

Coeds Give Opinions
On Way Men Dress

By BEATRICE TEODORO
Once the schoolboy has left
home to become the college man;
his severest grooming critic is no
longer mother-it's now the col-
lege woman, a discerning and out-
spoken observer.
"I can't stand to see suspenders,
or garters for socks," a coed ex-
plained. On the other hand; if
pot for those garters, another girl
would be repulsed by "socks that
fall down, showing the leg beneath
the slacks."
Also concerning footwear, a girl
expressed her disdain for unpol-
ished shoes and another for ar-
gyles. A third didn't like tennis
shoes "sans socks" and her friend
couldn't bear beachcombers with
socks.
Ties were also a topic of de-
bate. Definitely taboo were wide
ties, bow ties, and especially "ties
with pictures of girls on them."
Shirts came under attack too,
specifically against pink dress

A1

shirts and shirts with tucks or
pleats. And a reminder to the'
less color-conscious males: Girls
do not like contrasting plaids,
prints and colors in shirts, ties
and sport coats, when worn sim-
ultaneously.
Evidently some of the girls have
taken closer looks to find other
gripes, like unpressed shirts, dir-
ty collars, greasy hair, and five
o'clock shadow ("it scratches").
Khaki slacks are also not too
popular with the college women.
They prefer flannel slacks with
a slender, tight fit. One girl turn-
ed her nose up at "slacks with a
crease down the front that un-
.fortunately ends at the knee."
However, all the comments
were not sour ones. Women DO
like bulky men's sweaters, the new
corduroy blazers, tab collar shirts,
vests (lukewarm reception), and
suits on a date. And, we might as
well face it, they like men!s

Gain Favpr
For Autumi
Crew socks for men are sti
into the apparel limelight.
bulky knit hose, which fir
came popular among colleg
high school students, als
gaining favor among many
ers.
These socks are particular
propriate for those engagi
active sports or working a
the house.
Greater leisure and sub
living are factors helping t
count for the increased po
ity of crew socks. This t3
footwear adds, to the moo
after-work lounging, but sho
worn only with the most
outfits and not with Aport
ensembles.
The use of athletic hose I
pave the way for crew sock
the original white has beer
plemented with colors, sor
combination with circular
and contrasting hues.

Genuine Shell Cordovan

-Daily-Len Lofstrorn
WITH A SMILE AND HIS UMBRELLA-The Michigan Man strides forward in his versatile grey
cheviot herringbone suit, complete with vest, and styled in the natural cut. The suit is complimented
by black accessories, including a chalis fulard tie of black ground. A West Point grey hat completes
his ensemble, leaving him well dressed for that dinner or date.
Winter To Experience Comeback
Of Old Vests with Modern Flavor

SHELL CORDOVAN is a luxury leather because it is a s arce
and prized leather. It was once used in the shields of Spanish
noblemen because of its durability. Popular for gentleme'#
shoes because it takes a shine and ke it. Come. try a pair.
CAMPUS, BOOTERY
304 South State St.

The indications all point to a'
resurgence of vests this autumn.
No, this isn't old news; it's new
news, Vests are being revived,J
some in modernized flavors, and
some just as grandpa wore them.I
The demand for this item
travels in cycles. This time the
trend is helped by the substantial
preferences of college men, and
others who like natural shoulder'
suits, for garments that include a
matching vest. Perhaps another
influence is the vested suits worn
so often in past chilly seasons by
President Dwight D. Eisenhowerl
and Vice-President Richard Nixon.;

Many older men like the waist-
coat for its warmth, air of neat-
ness, and a place to stow spec-
tacles, pens, and other odd items.
Younger men see more and more
traditional or Ivy suits offered
with matching vests (some which
are reversible yet), the inner side
duplicating the lining of the jac-
ket. (Those linings can be pretty
gay at times.)
Separate vests come in a wide
variety of, materials, colors, and
patterns. They range in color from
those which stand out brightly to

those of small, neat designs and
quiet monotones.
Designed for casual outfits is a
gold, green, red, or medium grey
affair of heavy cotton in an oxford
weave with brocaded pattern.
For business or sports outfits, a
wool knit vest in a jersey weave
with a small self pattern is offered.
It comes in oxford grey or brown
and is in effect a sleeveless sweat-
er.
Offered in olive, brown, black,
or cream is the cabretta (leather)
vest with blunt corners and hand-
sitched edges. It can be cleaned
with a damp cloth or sponge.

i

my buddies
think they're

country club or
countryside... .
wear
SEBAGO-
with pride
r64 g
CI

f
New Steles First
at WILD'S

N
I

TRY THE "ALL-AMERICAN"

>:
'4<

The hamburgers and fries are always hot and
tasty ... the shakes are always thick and creamy
and the service is super. Mom likes McDonald's,
too ... she says she can feed us for less there
than she can at home. She likes the speedy
service, no car hops; no tipping, plenty of park-
ing space... and. most of all no dishes to wash
and no fussing in the kitchen.
Bring your family to McDonald's. You'll be
glad you did . ,. it's the tastiest food in town at
extra thrifty prices.

Value-priced
at just
$9.95 and $12.95
Avilble

I

English Tab Collar Shirts.. . $5.95
Oxford Button-down
White and Colors
by Sero ............ $5.95
Pure Silk Repps......... $2.50

HAMBURGER... SHAKE... FRENCH FRIES
...McDONALD'S "ALL-AMERICAN" ONLY 450

Let the tapered slimness of
this well-bred "Continental"
lake you everywhere in easy
comfort, breezy style! Super

Choseng interesting shirts and lively ties isn't di f
cult when you've only excellent ones to choose from.

look for the drive-in with the arches

II

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