100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1960 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

cy Cummerbunds Di
ditional Ivy Leaguer

ramatize
r Tuxedos,
By JOHN ROBERTS
The Ivy League tuxedo continues
to be the most popular fashion in
men's formal wear.
This design is characterized by
Its natural shoulder, straight cut
coat with shawl collar, and
trousers cut in a mode so casual
that they may almost be worn as
slacks.
Cumberbunds, which in recent!
seasons have become practicall% a
must for formal events, add a
spicing of color to the outfit
Rounding out the ensemble are
pleated shirts, smoke grey or black
jewelry, and black shoes.
Shoes exhibit _a wide variety,
of designs, quite different from
the days when the navy black,
plain-toe type was the only shoe
that could be properly worn at a
formal event. Now, continental
loafers, two-eyed continentals, or
virtually any other design con-
sistent with good taste, is accept-
able.
Since the war tails have virtually
disappeared from the American
campus, A common comment
heard from clothiers was that
college students today are less
concerned with smart appearance
than with wearing currently popu-
lar fashions, however atrocious.

Students Note Value
Of Good Appearance

Ponchos, Orientc

a A

Nr

Brighten Campus on Rainy Days

By MICHAEL HARRAH
The annual meeting of the na-
tion's top high school and college
business students took time out
recently to note the intrinsic value
of good appearance to a young
man crossing over from the world
of textbooks to the world of mar-
keting.
The convention met in Chicago
under the auspices of the Future
Business Leaders of America,
where they adopted a 10-point
code of ethics for business prac-
tices.
Realizing the importance of a
good appearance, one point in the
code reads: "I will dress and act
in a manner that will bring re-
spect to me and my employer."
The Future Business Leaders of
America have 2,200 chapters and
54,000 student members across the
nation. Virtually all of them have
noted that personal and classroom
instruction on groper attire and
good grdoming for business pay
off in the long run.
Recently, the FBLA has high-
lighted the importance of appear-
ance in the world of business
through a "dress right" student
guidance program.

Outgoing FBLA President Roy
S. Peters, Jr. of Southwest Okla-
homa State College at Weather-
ford said, "Many students forget
the importance of appearance in
getting and keeping a job. Per-
sonnel managers have no time to
waste, and, if you don't make a
good impression on them the first
time you seldom get a second
chance.
"But, that doesn't mean you can
afford to relax once you start
working. Your employer, your fel-
low employes, and the public first
know the 90 per cent of you made
up of your, apparel.'

Slim Lines

-Daily-Len Lofstrom
HE'S STEPPING OUT-in a classic black tuxedo with satin
shawl lapels. The coat is also of dressy black, styled in the tradi-
tional Chesterfield cut, with velvet collar. A burgundy cumberbund
and tie, and pleated shirt complete the dress wardrobe.
Clothiers Say Worsteds Still Popular

Fall

Sweat ers

Accentuate
Narrow Look
Slim lines are reflected in the
current fall trend in men's slacks.
Both in suit trousers and separate
slacks, the former baggy 'appear-
ance is slowly disappearing,
While the newest slacks defin-
itely aren't skin tight and don't'
give the lean, gaunt look they have
been furthercondensed at the
seat, knee, and cuff to "show off
the figure to better advantage."
Greater acceptance is coming for
the pleatless or plain front slacks
for that reason. The proportion of
the single pleat is gaining while
double pleats are declining.
Self-supporting waistbands of
one sort or another are definitely
gaining on belts. In fact, a recent
Joke at clothing conventions, 'a
belt with attaching slacks," has

By IRIS BROWN
For the coed in Ann Arbor, a
city long noted for its rainy
weather, a raincoat is one of the
most frequently used items in her
wardrobe.
Consequently it is essential that
her rainwear be traditional enough
to blend well with her many out-
fits, yet dramatic enough to ex-
press her sense of fashion.
Raincoats in dark-toned Oriental
prints and reversible ponchos are
the two latest influences in this
season's rainwear.
A practical garment,.. recom-
mended for European travel, is the
pure silk print in which the black
taffeta lining reverses to serve as
an evening coat. The Chesterfield
coat, both in solids and muted
plaids is another popular style.
For winter weather, many rain-
coats are also lined in fur or
blanket lined plaid wools with
hoods of the same material. Es-
pecially practical for football
games are the reversible ponchos
with round collars that zip Up the
front. Most are natural poplin on
one side with bright horseblanket
plaids on the other.
Another style, of wool, cashmere,
and nylon with a'waterproof sill-
con finish is patterned in bold
rainbow stripes.
This year's umbrellas are made
to be worn, not just carried. These,
too, carry, out the Oriental' trend
with their Pagoda-like shapes and
matching prints. Many are orna-
mented with rows of ruffles for
leopard skin patterns.
Many plastic rainhats are offered
in a wide-rim Spanish style. The
conventional hoods often have
flowers between the layers of plas-
tic.
For wet or dry, in storm and
sun, the college girl is expected to

-Dally-BobKaplan
LET IT POUR!--These three misses are well prepared for Ann
Arbor's rainy fall weather with their trench coats of tan and
dark green. The center coat is suitable for colder days with its,
warm pile lining. Umbrellas come in all colors of the rainbow.
Colorful Wid F rBasis
Of MnWiter Wardrobes

lard-finished worsteds continue
be the most popular design in
n's trousers, a check of campus
thing stores indicates.
It's easy to understand why,"'
d one clothier. "Worsteds wear!
ter. hold their creases better,
i are now- as cool as other
)es."
kn almost total preference for
in fronts was indicated. There ,

is little evidence that the single
pleat design has caught on.
For the most part, there is
an interest in Continentals that
ranges from lingering to reviving.
Color preferences do not seem
to have undergone any startling
revisions in recent months. Char-
coal brown, black olive, and a few
fancy checks and plaids are still
holding forth.

now become a reality, be pertly well-dressed. And in this
Offering of wool slacks with year's rainwear there is no rea-
"permanent" creases are more son why she shouldn't be.

By MARTHA MacNEAL
The versatile plaid is once again
the mainstay of fall and winter'
wardrobes. From casual ingenue to
sleek sophisticate, each finds a
plaid to echo the colorful world
around her. For the college girl on'
a budget, the plaid is especially
attractive because of its multicolor
practicality.
A single skirt takes on many per-
sonalities with different colored
blouses ahd sweaters and can be
dressed up or down, according to
mood and occasion. Reversible
skirts and coats double wardrobe
.potentialities with' chameleon-like
ease..
All' the old favorites, skirts,

r.

shorts; dresses, slacks, and jackets
are back in plaids for fall and
winter, but they show exciting dif-
ferences. Traditional Scottish tar-
tans and imitations share the
spotlight with wide, softly tex-
tured strokes of muted purples,
grays, browns, and greens, blended
in new furry materials.. At the
other extreme, brightly contrast-
ing reds, electric blues, blacks and
whites give dramatic flair to many
new skirts and dresses.
New innovations of style have
likewise adopted the plaid as a
basic pattern: ponchos to snuggle
under, skorts briskly flaring above
the knees, the new culottes, and, a
favorite symbol of going steady,

------- ---- --

NYLON

numerous this season. Likewise is
the selection of slacks in patterned
fabrics to go with the solid colors
in sport coats, known in college
circles as blazers. Also on the rise
are the pre-cuffed slacks which
can be taken home at once.
Patterned or plain, continental
or conservative classic, new slacks,
stride into fall with something
for everyone. There is a new air
of refinement to slacks - fewer
"gimmicked-up" models and fewer
brash patterns, but more comfort-
ably designed styles with many
handsome patterns supplementing
the solids.

Scarves Feature
Frothy Fabrics
No drastic changes concerning,
scarves have been made this year
except the 18-inch Brigette Bardot,
a favorite on college campuses, is
not being featured as nuch as in
the past. However, the larger silk
and chiffon scarves are still in
vogue.
For casual wear only, woolen
scarves in black and scotch plaids
are the most popular.

'SKI PARKAS

f r - -

-
, = .

: K KaFi F F * i f

Nationally Advertised

7 Y

-Daiy-Len Loistrom
OPEN AND SHUT CASE-Cardigan and pullover sweaterwear
for men is popular again this year. The black bulky knit on the
left is one example of the jacket type sweater which can be worn
over sport or dress shirts. The crew and boat neck sweaters in a
variety of plain and tweed yarns are abundant in muted shades
ranging from blue to reds. Wide stripes and contrasting trims,
as shown in the sweater on the right, are also included in this
year's styles.

Men's Wear

at Popular Prices

T7',

LINED- UNLINED

from $8.95

Upward Curves
Mark Hat Styles
Many a man will willingly get
hooked for a new fall hat this
season, when he sees how the new
hats with hooked back add.to his
appearance. The variety of hats
with sharp upward curve in back
o 8 30 is greater this season, and to-
gether with the same downward
snap of the front of the brim,
impart"a ,jaunty, youthful air.
Meantime, some brims have nar-
rowed again, though for several
seasons past meay people thought
the limit to brevity had been
reached.

PI

I

Sam's Store

I

Daily 9 to 5:30 ' ' Mondays 9 t
HAROLD S. TRICK
711 NORTH UNIVERSITY

100% Wool
Flannel
Dress Pants

r
:.
y , w
f
, r
y, F.. S ,.1.
z<.
$t : r
. i ,\ '
f
.., y r
r,^,
' .
ass "f{{...
r . S
i
f.;

Plain or pleated Front

lwwwow

i
3
i
Ii
W44t a t
SINCE 1,548...

OPEN DAILY
9 to 5:30

11

/

'T
.4(
'K
'c
'K
'K
K
s'k:
1
L .

f14

when interested in quality
men s wearing apparel

at SAIFFELL & BUSH

A thinking man always buys

3-PIECE CORD SUITS

C

Suits . .
sportcoats

. ,

59.50 to 99.50
37.50 to 65.00

. .

"1

convert into suits-sport coats-slacks
The complete wardrobe all in one package

s'.j

University Row-overshirt
in fine cotton oxford cloth

and at one modest price. Quality-made
by three different manufacturers.
Shown in the popular natural antelope tan,
loden green, olive green, and
burnt green. Regulars, shorts, longs

* FREE CUFF
ALTERATIONS
* ASSORTED
COLORS

11

I

CARDIGAN
and PULLOVER
SWEATERS

* fFrom under-grads to alumni ... here's the
shirt fashion that's sweeping the country ...
for campus, city, wherever there's relaxing
in view. You'll like the trim look of Univer-
sity Row tailoring ... contour-cut to fit your
figure. Authentic Ivy touches ... button-
down collar, buttonhole and pleat in back.
Completely washable, of course, in the most
popular Fall colors.

Dress
Spore
Shoe;
Neck
Hats

s Shirts . . 4.25 to 7.95
t Shirts . . 5.00 to 15.95
s .. .«.. 14.95-to 26.95
cwear . . . 1.50 to 5.00
. . . .. 7.95 to 11.95

I , .

,

I

and extra longs.

t""Q

- . - "

V ~ 4L~ ~W~1EM ,~7 I I

1 1 r~7 Wnn1 2116,001

I

I I I

'.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan