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October 23, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Red Leader Asks Solidarity

LONDON (AP} - Mao Tze-Tung
yesterday humbly recognized the
Soviet Union as the world's great-
est Communist power and offered
to soft-pedal his ideological quar-
rel with Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev in the interest of Red solidar-
ity.
The Chinese Communist lead-
er and his three top associates in
Peiping sent a message to Moscow
wh~ich stopped just short of bowl-
ing completely to Khrushchev's
will.
Their telegram, addressed to
Khrushchev and Soviet President
Leonid Brezhnev, was broadcast by
Moscow radio. It spoke of "the
eternal inviolable fraternal friend-
ship" of the peoples of Red China
and the Soviet Union and called
for Communist countries to "rally,
together even closer and intensi-
fy the struggle against imperial-
Theory Favored
Mao almost seemed to buy
Khrushchev's theory that war has
become unthinkable in this ni-
clear age and that Communism,
in any event, is strong enough now
to defeat capitalism by competi-
tion without shooting.
But this part of the message
contained a hedge. As worded, it
was sort of a Chinese puzzle cap-
able of various interpretations.
Mao did not specifically ac-
knowledge that war has become
an impractical instrument of na--
tional policy in the H-Bomb age.
War Inevitable
Mao regards himself as a sup-j
porter of fundamental Leninist
doctrine. He has described war
as an inevitable part of Commu-
nism's march to world domina-
tion. And, what is even graver, he
has suggested that Khrushchev's
revisionist doctrines tend to weak-
en the revolutionary drive of the1
Communist world.
Others who signed the message
with Mao were Liu Shao-Chi, Chu
Teh and Chou En-Lai. Their tele-
gram was in response to congrat-
ulations offered by Soviet leaders
on the 11th anniversary of the,
formation of the Chinese Commu-
nist regime.
Mao's telegram came after
months of campaigning by
Kbrushchev in other parts of the
Communist world to gain support
for Moscow's no-war line.
The Chinese Communist leader
messaged that his people were in-
spired by the "enormous successes
in the construction of commun-
ism" attained by the Soviet people.

Mobutu Aandoning
U Prefers, Lumumi
Colonel Sets FEAR SOVIET WALKOUT:
Trip to West, Arms Compromise.-Pi
eeKS er, UNITED NATIONS . (M-Some
neutral and Western countries Western resolutions now pending future su

Wants Iecognition
By Hamimarskjold
LEOPOLDVILLE, The Congo OP)
-Col. Joseph Mobutu virtually
abandoned his five-week-old mili-
tary regime yesterday while his
enemies redoubled efforts to bring
Communist-leaning Patrice Lum-
umba back to power.
Moliutu, exhausted by his fight
against opposition from all sides
and rumbling revolt in his own
army, announced a face-saving
trip to New York and Western
capitals next week to seek "un-
rl~rta~ninr"fnr hic almnc do

FACES CRISIS--President Charles De Gaulle's government faces

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1

possible censure this week in a controversy over his plans for a Ios
French atomic striking force. It is his first united opposition in funct anti-Communist regime,
two years of office. Country Torn
With the country torn by tri-
bal warfare and near anarchy, the,
G('; 3ovUC lT ment pro-Western group which ousted
Lumumba rapidly withered away
and the ex-premier's return to
FpowerFirst R al Crwissr seemed only a matter of
.rCThe United Nations Congo Com-
PARIS (P)-President Charles De Gaulle's government is facing mand openly pressed for "a re-
its first real crisis since assuming power two years ago. turn to legal democratic proc-
The test comes tomorrow, when a rarely united opposition tries esses.
With an impassioned. parlia-
to censure De Gaulle's policies toward the Atlantic alliance. mentary majority favoring Lum-
The focal point for opposition is De Gaulle's plan to give France umba, this clearly implied that
its own atomic striking force, independent of the North Atlantic the United Nations-despite its
Treaty Organization. The cost is put at $1.2 billion. But other un- theoretical noninterference in the
popular aspects of the austere president's policy also are at stake. Congo's domestic affairs--prefers
The major deterrent to stronger Lumumba to the present military
,s opposition is fear of what might regimpe.
A E CChief happen if the government really Mobuuri edfr hweedks to per-
is censured. Some say the result suade India's Rejeshwar Dayal,
U r .T, rscould be governmental chaos or head of the UN Congo operation,
eeniary ro.to give official recognition to his
Seek Cooperation provisional government.
The "Europeans" of the left Exasperated by consistent re-
HOT SPRINGS, Va, (-Chair- seek to force De Gaulle into closer fusal, Mobutu slammed the door
man John A. McCone of the cooperation in building the kind on Dayal and said he would ap-
Atomic Energy Commission said of integrated Europe they would peal directly to Secretary-General
yesterday the United States must like to see Dag Hammarskjold and the UN
resume underground nuclear tests The "French Algeria" parties of General Assembly in New York.
shortly unless Russia stops "fili- the right want to undermine his At the same time, Dayal re-
bustering" in talks on banning of offer of self-determination for the c e i v e d Leopoldville provincial
atomic testing. Algerians. president Cleophas Kamitatu, one
There is pressure on the right- of Lumumba's most persistent
ists to act now by toppling the supporters, and encouraged him
government-if they can-because to make another attempt to rec-
of reports e Gaulle is planning oncile Lumumba with President
a new step on the long path toward Joseph Kasavubu.
ending the six-year war in Al- Kasavubu, who fired Lumumba
geria. on Sept. 5, has lived in virtual
$1.00 non-members Provisional Government isolation ever since and failed to
No one really knows what he give his active support to any of
INGRY PERSONS! intends, but the general belief is the groups trying to get the gov-
that he may set up some form of ernment machinery functioning
er 23 . . . 6 P.M. provisional government in Algiers without Lumumba,
and to reopen negotiations with
the nationalist rebels, who have
I1 Street their own exile provisional gov-
ernment in Tunis. W LD ' S
For the anti-De Gaulle forces, VKLU
Swho can seldom agree on any-

Hill
SUPPER
75c for members
OPEN TO ALL HU
SUNDAY, Octob
1429 Hi

I
I
4
4

S

S.G.C.
w e
TON IGHT at 7 and 9:15
THE BANK DICK
with W. C. Fields
Cora Witherspoon
Franklin Pangborn
SHORT: IT IS GOOD TO LIVE
Joponese documentary
of atomic bomb survivors).
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 Cents

thing except their common dis
like of his regime, the striking
force issue provides a handy pre-
text to get together. Few French-
men really want to pay tax mon-
ey for an all-French nuclear de-
terrent, and fewer still would like
to see their country led toward
military isolation from its allies.
Premier Michel Debre has de-
nied that the new deterrent force
will mean higher taxes, at least
during the initial five years of
the present program. He insists
France is still loyal to its alli-
ances but will be more respected
with its own nuclear force,
France Cites
'Interference'
NICE, France J) - President
Charles de Gaulle twice yester-
day accused the Soviet Union of
trying to interfere in the Alger-
ian rebellion.
Addressing tens of thousands of
wildly cheering Frenchmen in
Cannes and later in Nice, he bit-
terly criticized what he called "in-
terference in our business."
The French government has al-
ways considered the 6-year-old Al-
gerian insurrection an internal
affair, not subject to outsidg com-
ment or action.,

rMiA

Union

Oct. 28-29

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I S
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NIXON IS COMINGI
JOIN THE MARCH from Diag to train
R station. We will leave at 9 A.M.
I i
WE WILL BE SINGING:
Cheer loud and long for our map Nixon
For today we raise our banners high

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