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October 23, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICRIGAN DAILY

'RAM NOTES:
embrandt Prints on Display

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Poster Art Forms Link Between Artists, Public

mbrandt Prints," the major
xhibition of the fall semes-
pens 'today at Alumni Me-
1 Hall.
lcted in connection with a
randt seminar led by Prof.
Rosenberg, visiting profes-
om Harvard and curator of
, Fogg Art Museum, the 77
randt pieces with 4 addi-
examples for study were
d from Midwest collections.
rt Sahl, called the "best of
ew comedians" by Time mag-
in a cover story-profile this
er, will give two perform-
at 7:15 and 9:30 p.m. tomor-'
it Ann Arbor High School.
zl's career started at the end~

of the McCarthy scare when he
began commenting on the politi-
cal scene. When speaking this
summer he said of the two presi-
dential candidates, "Thank God,
they can't both win."
* * *
Folk Singer Josh White will
sing at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at Ann
Arbor High School.
Sponsored by the Folklore So-
ciety, White will sing and play
folk songs, blues and songs of so-
cial significance.
Born in Greenville, South Caro-,
lina in 1908, White began singing
under the guidance of his father
and a preacher.
Sir Geoffrey Crowther, an auth-

ority on English education and
former editor of "The Econo-
mist" will discuss the difference
between English and American
schooling in a panel discussion at
9 a.m. today over WXYZ-TV
Prof. Arthur Eastman, of the Eng-
lish department and Prof. S.
Claude Eggertsen and Warren
Ketcham, of the school of educa-
tion will complete the panei.
Prof. George Peek, of the politi-'
cal science department and Prof.
Paul Kauper of the Law school
will discuss the conflicts of reli-
gious belief and the government
in a program entitled "Freedom
of Religion" at noon today on
WWJ-TV.

By JUDITH SATTLER
Although bullfight poster and
"Fly TWA" signs hardly seem
like great art, posters have been
an important link between artists
and the public in modern times.
Posters are created to have an
immediate impact, on a hurried
viewer; therefore, there are cer-
tain qualities that all posters must
have, as the first poster artists
found.
Since the motif must appeal
immediately, it must be up-to-
date or even a little ahead of
popular tastes. To put across a
central idea, the poster must con-
centrate on one main theme,
eliminating unnecessary detail.
Bright colors attractrattention
easily, and so these are used in

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poster art. A text is used to ex-
plain the picture; it is kept short
and simple.
A poster is a lithograph, or
printed picture. It is drawn on a
stone or metal plate, or on trans-
fer paper.
Color is important in posters,
and so they are conceived in terms
of color. A separate plate is used
to print each color in the 'picture.
A printed picture has flat color,
compared with the thick effect
possible with paint. Special tex-
tural effects can be achieved in
printing, by scarping the plate
with a knife, by applying -the ink
with a sponge, or by splattering.
Rise of Commercial Art
In the 1880's, artists became
interested in poster art. Prof.
Miesel, of the history of art de-
partment, noted that some artists
no longer felt they were above
doing commercial work, but began
to see it as a "significant func-
tion" for their art.
Other reasons for the interest
were the new popularity of
Japanses prints and lithography.
And, when naturalism in art died,
kartists wanted to explore new
fields; poster style gave "subjects
invested with all the power of
suggestion" Graphics magazine
has noted.

Jules Cheret was the first' im-
portaant poster artist. He used
bright pictures of pretty, frivolousj
girls; his work had a definitely
"Gay Nineties" flair to it. He
also developed color lithography1
for posters, using four or five
colors, and differing textures.'
Other important artists of the
period created posters. Manet,
Daumier, and Delacroix tried
them, as well as Gaugin, Pissarro,
and Seurat.
Toulouse-Lautrec was perhaps;
the foremost artists in the poster
medium. Prof. Miesel said his
greatness was in his "artistic ex-
cellence,'not in his firstness."
Used Symbols
Toulouse used pictoral symbols,
not illustration. He used big sur-
faces of plain color, sharp lines,
and unusual angles, and incor-
porated the text into the composi-
tion.
Posters became less popular after
the early 1900's. A revival came
in Germany after World War I,
with the Bauhaus movement. This
school wanted to "relate the artist
to society," Prof. Misel said.
The Bauhaus theory was that
fine arts are similar to pure

scientific research, Prof. Miesel
explained, and to make them rele-
vant; artists must use them in
posters, propadanda, and adver-
tising. Some of the very advanced
Bauhaus artists "abdicated their'
roles as pure artists, becoming
only poster artists," Prof. Miesel
explained.
Graduaily, however, poster 'art
became less: the property of the
creative artists, than cof the com-
mercial artst. Ascommercial
artists took over,A they drew on
"fine arts as a fund of ideas to
be exploited," Prof. Miesel noted,
but did not create new forms.
Creative Artists Advertise
-Although, as Prof. Miesel said,
"advertising art is a steal from the
creative artists," since World War
II, the creative artists have been
dipping into advertising.
In art marketing, there is a
new respect for publicity, and so
art dealers encourage artists to
make posters advertising shows of
their works. Artists such as Picas-
so, Braque, Leger, Matisse,
Chagall, and Miro have made such
posters, each in' characteristic
style.

Art has also been used to sup-
port ideology. Men like Picasso
have used their art to support
the extreme leftist groups. Piscas-
so's famous peace dove was creat-
ed for the Communist Peace Con-
gresses.
Pure and Commercial
Today poster art is divided be-
tween the pure artists, who do
little of it, but whose forms inspire
it, and the commercial artists, who
create the great mass of visual
art which reaches our eyes in
magazines, on billboards, and
television, and which develops our
tastes in art.
Poets Topic
Of ,Seiijar
The Student Governyment Coun-
cil's Reading and Discussion pro-
gram is sponsoring a seminar on
"Young Poets" at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow in the Honors Lounge of
the Undergraduate Library.
The seminar will be led by Prof.
John Heath-Stubbs of the English
department.

VIECOMING:

isplays Show 'Roman Rampage'

Theme

I

-Daily--James Warneka
DORMITORT-"The Search for the Gopher" was presentation of Gomberg House, South Quadrangle.
It merited second place in the Mens' Dormitory competition.

MA DELTA PHI

-Daily-James Warneka
DISPLAY-A mechanized gopher was. featured in Lambda Chi's
display entitled "You Casseus has a Lean Hungry Look."

I

11

Save Your Ticket Stub

JOSH WHITE
Saturday Nite
October 29
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Tickets at Follett's and Ulrich's

The office of the Lord High Executioner is
now accepting BLOCK ORDERS
for the Gilbert & Sullivan Society's Production

of

k'r~ H E

I KADO44

Special Limited Engagement!
Starts October 28 for 6 Performances Only
2 Performances Daily - 2 P.M. and 8 P.M.
STATE THEATRE
TICKETS FOR ALL PERFORMANCES NOW ON SALE BY MAIL!

November 10th, 11th, and 12th

-Daily-James warneka
PLACE-Winners of the fraternity division of the display
tition, Theta Delta Chi's presentation was entitled "Roman
I,'

,
....
1r ' +

I.

STARTrING
DAYNO
"COMEDY SPIKED WITH FARCE.,.
A MAXIMUM OF WIT..
PETER SELLERS nails down the abundant range
of his skill and his truly superior ability."
"**

DIAL
)8-6416

t~. r JACK cliM6NS VATE I [*11
pU 1 IDIM KICStEY w CRAIS U [EtE
114"+" w " ..

DE LUXE
s vm. - _

70 may ouy your -%*I U5U U*an Pc~Fnoy minU.. *.
Seats will not be numbered, but there will be a seat
for every ticket up to the capacity of the theatre....
No Standing Room.

ti

FRI.& SAT. MATINEE ...........$1.25
EVES.& SUN. MATINEE.......31.75
Children 900 All Performances

MAT. 2 PJ
EVES.1 P.1

I MAKE CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO
STATE THEATRE, Ann Arbor, Michigan

M.
M.j

I1

nrvrn ervi I PK

1 s

Please send me . Tickets for Data nr tet--or
Alternate

PRICES-$1,25 Thursday night, $1.75 Friday and

I

Fif

E Ptrrormanm (Night or Met.)

II

11

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