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October 16, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER. 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTOBER.

..._..

A CHASE TO APPEAR:
Hines To Open Extra Concert Series

difrnebteeRrs reo

Hines, bass with

the

>olitan Opera, will open the
SUnion Extra Concert Series
tperformance at 8:30 p.M.
ow in Hill Auditorium.
s was the first American
n 40 years to star in the
roles at the Metropolitan
broad. He also sang with
mini in Beethoven's "Missa
nis," and with the New York
rmonic and other orches-
lines has made many tele-
appearances.
singer is particularly f am-

ous for his portrayal of Mephisto-
pheles in "Faust," Gurnemanz in
"Parsifal," of King Philip in "Don
Carlo," of the title roles in "Boris
Godounov" and "Don Giovanni."
I ka Chase .. +
Ilka Chase, actress, author and
television personality, will read
humorous literature on love in a'
program entitled "The Dear Emo-
tion," at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday in
Hill Aud.
Miss Chase is the first of six
guests on the Platform Attractions

EXQUISITE EXHIBIT ON
Colonial u a ca
Photostats of PICTURES and DOCUMENTS
showing the role of the Jew in Colonial Times.
BRASLEY LOUNGE-1429 Hill Street
October 14-November 12
B'NAI B'RITH BILLEL FOUNDATION

series. Tickets for individual pro-
grams go on sale Monday at the
Hill Aud. box office.
VU' Players .*
The University Players season
opens at 8 p.m. Wednesday with a
concert reading of Christopher
Fry's "The Firstborn" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. The pro-
duction will run through Satur-
day and is included in season
tickets.
Percussion Group .***
The University perscussion or-
chestra will present the develop-
ment of drummiing from the
tribal tom-tom to the modern
band and orchestra at 9 a.m. on
WXYZ-TV. "Rhythms of the
Drum" is part of the University
television series "Understanding
Our World."
Magazine Editor . .
Douglass Cater, Washington edi-
tor of "The Reporter" magazine,
will discuss the "Freedom of the
Press" at noon today on WWJ-
TV. The program will describe the

difference between press freedom
and the charter freedoms.
String Orchestra .«.
The University String Orchestra,
directed by Gilbert Ross, will pre-
sent a concert of 17th and 18th
century music at 8:30 p.m. Tues-
day in Rackham Lecture Hall.

Committee
Announced
For Event
The Spring Weekend central
has been announced by Pat Lynch,
'62, and Gary Roggin, '62, co-
chairmen of the event.
Those chosen were: Susan Fish-
er, '63, and Betsy Holleb, '63, sec-
retaries; Eugene Davidson, '61,
treasurer; Diane Thimme, '63Ed.,
and J. Michael Davison, '62 A &
D, programs; Jeffery Rubenstein,
'63, and Marsha Kanter, '63, Fri-
day afternoon events; Edward
St.ein, '63, and Sue Rosenfeld, '63,
Skit night.
Others chosen were Jerry Las-
key, '63, and Laurie Lipman, '63,
Saturday afternoon events; Mich-
ael Blumenthal, '63, and Rosalyn
Schulman, '63, dance; Nancy
Keck, '62, and Richard Strickland,
'63E, tickets; Samuel Zell, '63,
Pamela Marzulla, '62, and Judy
Novitsky, '63, publicity; Cody En-
gels, '63, and Myrna Moxley, '62,
concessions; Winia Morrison, '63,
and Robert Finke, '63, awards and
judges.
There will be a mass meeting
for those interested in working
on committees at 7:30 p.m., Dec.
6 in the Union Ballroom. Sub-
committee chairmen and workers
will be chosen from those ,at the
mass meeting.

By JUDITH SATTLER
Jazz has not really become re-
spectable to many music lovers
today : Brubeck cannot compare
with Bach.
Manymusicians, among them°
Prof. H. Wiley Hitchcock of the
music school, are unwilling to
charge jazz off so easily, however.
One of the reasons they value
it is because it has helped revive
an important element in serious
American music - improvisation.
Jazz has had a major effect.
on serious art music only recently.'
Prof. Hitchcock traces, American
art music culture chiefly to1Ger-
manic origins; American com-
posers tried to imitate Brahms
and Beethoven, and ignored native
American folk music.
'Dip into Jazz'
In the 1930s, when proletarian
art was. popular, some American
.composers began "dipping into
jazz," he noted. These composers'
were not jazz men, though, and so
the results were not outstanding,
he added.
"Only recently," Prof. Hitchcock.
said,. "has jazz been used by
serious composers who are sym-,
pathetic to it, and who used it
well." He cited Harold Shapiro,
Rolf Liebermann, and Leonard
Bernstein, as such men..
With the increasing use of jazz
has come an interest, inthe forms
of jazz, particularly in improvisa-
tion.

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Jazz Not Totally Respectable

H. WILEY HITCHCOCK
...supports Jazz

U

SGC
THE WOLVERIN'ECLUB
Sponsors
WISCONSIN TRIP
'.October 28-30
Ticket and Round Trip Transportation ... $25
For Information and Reservations
Call NO 5-8215 between 3 and 5 any day

JEROME HINES
... to sing tomorrow

FIRST AVAILABLE:
'U' Releases Translation
Of Russian Course Syllabi

or call NO 5-8367... Erwin

or NO 2-3155 . . Judy

U

,the unani mus delight
of critics and audiences."

LIFE Magazine

+tA R H

"A COMIC
MASTER PIECE.
.HILARIOUS
FARCE
,CONSTANTLY
FUNNY!"
-McCAS MAGAZINE
"SURE TO
I TICKLE THE
FANCY!
SELLERS IS
-BRILLIANT!"

The University has released
translations of the syllabi of three
Russian university courses, which
are the core of the Communist
Party's indoctrination program.
It is believed that the transla-
tions are the first available to
Western scholars. The three
courses, which are required for
all Soviet university students, re-
present five years of study.
The titles are: "History of the
Communist Party"; "Political
Economy"; and "Historical and
Dialectical Materialism." Prof.
Horace W. Dewey of the Slavic
languages departmen did the
translations.
Slanted Teaching
Prof. Dewey and Prof. Morris
Boernstein of the economics de-
partment, two University experts
on Russia, agree that Communist
education is heavily slanted to
the party line, and that the syllabi
represent up-to-date answers to
problems of Communist theory.
"In any sort of group discussion,
you will find that all Soviet citi-
zens have the same cut-and-dried
answers to the problems of the
world. This is obviously a result
of this intensive and completely
one-sided indoctrination which
they get constantly through their
educational career."
The treatment in the syllabi of
such current topics as co-existance
is interesting. Prof. Dewey says.
"The most vital question of Ameri-
cans as well as to the whole
world is to know how serious
Khrushchev is about co-existance,"
Syllabi Passages
The syllabi contain such pas-
sages as these which bear on
current understanding of Soviet
intentions:
JOSH
WHITE
-SATURDAY NIGHT-
OCTOBER 29
All seats reserved
On Sale Now at
Follett's and Ulrich's

"The Communist Party. organ-I
izer of the struggle of the Soviet
people for fulfillment of the task t
of catching up with the United
States in the coming years in per
capita production of meat, butter
and milk.
"Competition of two world
economic systems: socialist and
capitalist. Possibility of their
peaceful coexistence. Decisive ad-1
vantages of world socialist eco-
nomic system over world capitalist
economic system.
"Incompatibility of the cult of
personality with socialist ideology.
Struggle of the party for sur-
mounting the harmful results of
J. V. Stalin's cult of personality.
! Fight against attempts to revise
Marxism-Leninism and to find
! fault with Soviet actuality under
cover of the fight against the cult
of personality."
Called Iindoctrination'
Prof. Boernstein says "Syllabi
in the Political Economy" course,
clearly show the extent to which'
economics teaching in the Soviet
Union is an indoctrination in
Marxism and in the current
ideological line of the Communist
party."
University President Harlan
Hatcher, who visited the Soviet
Union in 1959, calls the new trans-
lations "highly significant docu-
ments for anyone interested in
education."
In part, they explain the highly
distorted view of this the United
States and its economic system
which is held by otherwise wel -
educated Russians.
Contrast with U.S.
"These courses provide a start-
ling contrast to our own educa-
tional methods. There are no
theoretical conflicts, only truth
and falsity; no objective analysis
of an opposing system, only criti-
cism, and bibliographies list only
Soviet authors favorable to the
current party line."
In "Political Economy" for ex-
ample, the required reading lists
contains only six authors for 300
hours of instruction: Marx, Engels,
Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev and
Mao Tse-tung. "A comparable
course in an American university
would include readings from at
least 20 to 30 different authors,"
President Hatcher adds.
In an introductory statement to
the translations, issued Wednes-
day in book form, President
Hatcher explains the courses and
reports on the visit of the U.S.
delegation he led. (This delega-
tion originally obtained the syl-
labi.)

Cut Dimension
"With our worship of the printed
page, we have cut one whole
dimension out of music," Prof,
Hitchcock said. He pointed out
that it is exciting to communicate
with the mind of someone like
Brubeck, but that it is possible
only in improvisation.
"In hearing a composed work,
the listener may communicate
with the mind of Bach, for ex-
ample" he said. "Why not have
communication with the mind of
the performer as well?" he asked.
In Mozart's time, all musicians
were expected to be proficient
improvisors, just as they were
expected to be competent in inter-
preting music- written by other
musicians.
Rights Group1
TomlsRteslts
Of Crusade'
(Continued from Page 1)
"We must not train ourselves in
the schools to accept our current
condition, but we must train our-
selves in social philosophy, public
administration and law, so that
we may have energies and minds
capable of working on the new
frontiers of science and govern-
ment soon." Jones asked for "posi-
tivist" leadership, which "includes
programs as 'well as protests so
that we may negotiate with the
power elite, all the while pledging
mass action as our threat. We
must even make our imprisonment
ominous by never letting the
Southern white forget that leaders
like Jawkohashr Nehru and Kwaml
Nkrumah emerged from jails in
their own lands."
Rev. James Lawson, a Negro
minister who was jailed in Nash-
ville and later fired from Vander-
bilt University devinity school in
Nashville urged students "to accept
with great joy the necessity of
suffering under the hatred of a
whole culture." Imprisonment,
said Lawson, "does not stop but
incraeses the onrushing thrust of
our mission. People know we are
jailed unjustly; they know the
character of the society we seek,
and perhaps by our passivity we
may instill courage in others.

Mozart gave a performance In
Mantua at the age of 14, in which
more than half of the works listed
on the program were to be im-
provised, Prof. Hitchcock noted.
One selection was even to be a
fugue on a theme provided by,
someone in the audience.
This immediate kind of art
died out in our "paper music-
culture," Prof. Hitchcock said. But
recently there have been various
experiments in which the composer
gives up some of his authority,
either to the performer or to!
chance, he noted.
In some of these modern worksI
true improvisation is tried, and
"the performer is the source of the
composition," he said.
'Knocked 'Out'
For example, composer Lukas
Foss is "knocked out by the idea
of improvisation in a non-jazz
style," he said, "and has used it
entensively in his music. Foss
picked up the idea -from listening
to jazz. ,
Foss's music has achieved some
notice; last week the New York
Philharmonic orchestra under
Leonard Bernstein performed a
work by Foss entitled "Concerto
for Improvising Instruments and
Orchestra."
Charles Ives, forerunner of many
contemporary musical develop-
ments, wrote passages into his
music which said, in effect, here
the flutist must make up some-
thing." Ives also used the device
of allowing the performer to repeat
certain sections of the work as,
many times as he wished.

Other composers have used semi-
improvisation of various kinds.
n'a Uses Selections
In 'acomposition called "Tem-
pos," composer Karlheinz Stock-
hausen has used sections in which
the woodwind player is to hold a
certain note as long as possible, or,
as long as his breath holds out.
This determines what the other
players do, as far as time goes.
"Morton Feldman is another
composer with ideas," Prof. Hitch-
cock said. Feldman has turned
upside the tradition relationships
between time and pitch.
In conventional music, -'the
exact pitch of the note played
is determined, but the time is
only roughly indicated by a nota-
tion of "Fast," "Slow" or "moder-
ately."
Controls Timing
Feldman controls timing by
precisely determining the time a
note is held in fractions of a se-
cond: the pitch of the note is left
to the performer, with only a
suggestion that he play a high
note or a low one.
John Cage, another modern
music writer, is experimenting
with randomness in music. He
records only two or three notes
on a page, and lets the performer
weave a composition around any
or all of them, Prof. Hitchcock
said.
The way in which Cage chooses
the notes he does record is also
unusual.
nu.Blank Sheet
-Cage does the equivalent of
taking a blank sheet .of paper,
finding a few flaws on the paper,
making pencil markings on the
flaws, then putting a piece of
transparent staff' paper over the
blank sheet and seeing where the
pencil marks fell on the music
staffs.
The works of these composers
are only a few examples of the
contemparary reaction against the
paper music culture, Prof. Hitch-
cock noted, and seem to be tend-
ing in an important new direc-
tion for music.
Adelson To Talk
On Russian Novel
Prof. Joseph Adelson of the psy-
chology department will discuss
Dostoevski's "Crime and Punish-
ment" at 4:15. p.m. tomorrow in
the Honors Lounge of the UGLI.
The discussion is part of the Stu-
dent Government Council Read-
ing and Discussion program.

N U

l
w
, n

Starring
PETER SELLERS

PSYCHO
TODAY tRKI53:5-515-7:15-9

I have asked that no one be
admitted to the theatre after
the start of Pach performance,
This, of course, is to help you
enjoy PSYCHO morel

... r s war s s .r . .f. .---"-.- _-

"The brightest,
liveliest comedy
this year!"
--Crowther, N.Y. Times

a
DIAL NO 5-62903
r

I DIAL NO 2-6264

t

NOW

Read
Daily

Thru Wednesday

BOX OFFICE OPENS TOMORROW 10 A.M.

IT HITS LIKE A

I

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS PLAYBILL

Classifieds

MARINE ASSAULT
--BOLD, SCORCHING
AND RELENTLESSI

Department of Speech

i
w w w w - w w - - - - - - -- -

II

I

THIS WEEK, 8:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, CHRISTOPHER FRY'S

THE

FlRSTBOR

S.G.C.
CClt payUdd
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
An American in Paris
Color

'0

I

ap

I

FREE WITH $6.00 OR $4.00 SEASON SUBSCRIPTION, OR $1.00

Season tickets include:

"The Frogs" by Aristophanes - Nov. 3-5 Varsity Pool
Scenes from "Hansel & Gretel," "The Flying Dutchman," and "I Pagliacci,"

III

/I.

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