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October 14, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

Voice Announces Platform Provisions

ll

students in SOC through the es-
tablishment of conveniently lo-
cated SGC polling places.
Non-medical and non-academic
evaluations of the student by resi-
dence hall authorities and Univer-
sity communication with the stu-
dent's parents without the stu-
dent's knowledge are concerns the
party would act on.

V V V V V

v v v v

OnAheCJ\Iouie

V V VV V r
I,
a
y
v
.a s ~ aa

Van Tyne House of South Quadrangle will give a party from 9 to
12 p.m. tomorrow on the theme "Monte Carlo Visits the Famous Cities
of the World."
Each corridor will decorate doors after a famous city. In addition,
each corridor will sponsor a gambling game. There will be dancing
and refreshments in the main lounge.
The party will be open only to Van Tyne House, residents and
alumni.
* * *
Chi Omega will hold an open house from 4 to 6 p.m. tomorrow.
There will also be an open-open house at the same time.

It advocates the elimination of
the requirements for a faculty
adviser and the submission of a
membership list from groups
seeking recognition as student
organizations.
Public Criteria
The party will seek official,
publicly announced criteria for
the selection of residence hall
counselors. It also wishes to eli-
minate the requirement of photos
on dormitory applications.
It will work toward the deferral
of rush and increased indepen-r
dence in off-campus housing. It
advocates the implementation of
Regents Bylaw 2:14 which denies
the use of University facilities to
landlords proven to discriminate
and improvement in housing ar-
rangements for international stu-
dents.
Seeks Eliminations
Elimination of the present wage
differential between student and
non-students for the same labor,
and reduction of the $7 driving
fee are included,
The platform supports resolu-
tions adopted by the United States
National Student Association deal-
ing with the student's right to
non-violent protest and endorse-
ment of the Point Four Youth
Corps. It is also in accord with
USNA opposition to loyalty oaths
and disclaimer affadavits and its
affirmation of local control of
federal aid to higher education,
conditional dissolution of the
House Committee on Un-American
Activities, and support of student
sit-ins.
it favors lowering the voting
age to 18, and the retention of the
constitutional status of the Uni-
versity as an independent, publicly
controlled corporation.

SGC Hears
C ommittees
At Meeting
By CYNTHIA NEU
Re-establishment of the former
International Committee and re-
ports from various committees
and activities were included in
the business conducted at the
Student Government C o u n c il
meeting Wednesday.
The International Committee
was abolished last year when the
Council decided that the Interna-
tional Co-ordinating Board :could
abs6rb the committee's duties.
This proved infeasible, so the In-
ternational Committee was re-es-
tablished to deal with any matters
in the international area that SGC
deems necessary.
Regulations Reviewed
The Driving Regulations Com-
mittee reported that they have
reviewed student complaints listed
last May, and will report soon on
changes which have been made.
In a report on Airflight to Eu-
rope, chairman Michael. Bagley,
said that this year 170 persons
used the flights and that two'
.flights are tentatively planned for
next year on major airlines for a
round trip cost of about $250.
The SGC-Chamber of Com-
merce Student Business Relations
Committee outlined its purposes
and plans for this year.
Discuss Concerns
Chairman John Ross, '61, ex-
plained that the group, composed
of representatives from various
student organizations and Ann Ar-
bor businessmen, will meet
throughout the year to discuss
common concerns in the areas of
clothing, food services, drugs, de-
partment stores and banking.
The Council also heard plans
for orientation of SGC candidates.
The purpose of the program is to
inform the candidates for elec-
tion to SGC of the Council's pur-
N poses, functions and responsibili-
ties.
lze Purmalis, Grad., also re-
ported on her year as a student
at the University of Delhi under
an SGC program. She termed her
experience "very valuable" and
encouraged the Council to con-
tinue the program, which was
abolished because of lack of
funds.
'League Picks
New Officers
Linda Unrad, '62, has been

Women Graduates Dis
Academics, Organizatic

By JUDITH BLEIER
"Learning the facts is of minor
importance compared to learning
the principles around those facts,"
Ruth Alkema, assistant to the
dean of women, said Wednesday
night.
Miss Alkema was a member of
a panel of recent University wo-
men graduates. The panel at-;
tempted to relate college experi-
ence to their present lives in a
discussion entitled "College Ex-
periences: Useful?", as a part of
Women's Week sponsored by the
League.
Thegroup also included Mrs.
Harold Oberman, president of the
League in 1957-58 and now an
elementary school teacher; Jo
Hardee, past president of Mortar-
board, past executive vice -presi-
dent of SGOC and currently a re-
porter for a Detroit newspaper;
Mary Wellman, past Panhellenic,
president and now assistant pro-
gram director in the League; Mrs
Robert Weaver, president of Sink,
an Ann Arbor association of alum-
nae of the University,
Compare Advantages
The discussion centered around
a comparison of the advantages of
academics and activities.

"You've come to college to find
a place for yourself," Mrs. Ober-
man stressed. "In the large lec-
tures that the University offers
you are lost; everything is mech-
anized." In addition to an aca-
demic atmosphere one must learn
to fit into the social atmosphere
of a school this size, she said.
"A lot more things are going
on than you've ever realized, Miss
Wellinan said. "Maybe you'll take
up some off-beat courses, which
may open up new avenues of ex-
ploration."
Academics Important
Mrs. Weaver agreed, putting em-
phasis on the non-required cour-
ses, such as music, literature and
fine arts.
-"But," warned Mrs. Oberman,
"while activities may find you
a place in the world, do not ignore
academics entirely," Mrs. Ober-
man warned.
Miss Hardee agreed, regretting
that she had become too "over-
involved" during her senior year.
"Don't let college life become a
burden to you," she told the group.
II MsncAu. eri

I

WOMEN'S LEAGUE PANEL

Leader:
ne of America"

will be held this Thursday

Masonic Aud., Detroit
Saturday, Oct.22 8:20
Tickets at Downtown Grinnell's
and Masonic Temple
$2.20 $3.30 $4.40
Mail Orders to
Mosonic Auditorium, 500 Temple.
Enclose Self-Addressed,
Stamped Envelope.,
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING SATURDAY
2 ALL-TIME GREATS

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Blues * Ballads * Bluegrass
Only 90c (A BARGAIN)
With his: * GUITAR * BANJO * FIDDLE
HARMONICA * AUTOHARP
DOBRO * KAZOO * DULCIMER * MANDOLIN
8:30 TICKETS at:
UNION BALLROOM Union . .. Door . .. Disc Shop

s

TAU KAPPA
EPSILON
will sponsor
the trophy
for the winners
of the

,a

I

"Yell Like Hell"
Contest

. I

I

named coordinating vice-presi-
dent of the Women's League, She
will be in charge of all class pro-
jects including Frosh Weekend,
Soph Show, Junior Girl's Play,
and Senior Night.
Others appointed to League po-
sitions are: Madeline Bates, '63,
Women's Judiciary Council mem-
ber; Betsy Holleb, '63, Buro-Cat
advisor; Elaine Crosby, '63, So-
cial committee member; Debby
Davidson, '63, Irene Boycoff, '61
Ed., University Service committee
member; Susan Johnson, '63, and
Nancy Gritzmacher, '62Ed, Com-
munity Service committee mem-
bers.
Leonard To Speak
On Medical Plan
R. L. Leonard, secretary. of the
Fabian International Bureau, will
be presented by the Political Is-
sues Club to discuss the British
nat.ional health services, at 4:30
p.m.. today, Room 3KLM, Michi-
gan Union.

NEW
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AN EA IAAMN PROUCTON
KARL MALDENLEE J. COBB
woa Rod Steiger " Pat Henning
.. EVA MARIE SAINT
AND.-

BRANDO
ThoeWILD P

-n

k

Friday Evening

Service

I

-H

Organization

? Notices
Congregational Disciples E & R Stud.
GuItd, Noon Luncheon Discussion, Fire-
side "Our Role in the Play for Peace,"
refreshments, 8 p.m., Oct. 14, 524
Thompson.
*s**
Grad. Stud. Council, Mixer, Ruel
KenWon Orchestra, Oct. 14, 9-12 p.m.,
314 E. Liberty.
N_wman Club, Initiation Ball--Tony
T,19 tinTrio, Oct. 14, 8.30 p.m., 331
Thompson.
Subscribe to
The
Michigan Daily

i

in honor of
SIMCHAT TORAH
7:00 HILLEL
1429 Hill Street

DIAL NO 5-6290

STARTS TODAY

k

S.G.C. Cinena ljui4
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
Dumas' CAMILLE An American in Paris
(color)
Greta Garbo Robert Taylor r-m :vm i v I rI r APON

Dramatic Arts Center
presents Kafka's
"METAMORPHOSIS"
(filmed in Ann Arbor)
and other experimental films
Friday, Saturday at 8 P.M.
in the Ann Arbor Public Library
Admission free
DIAL N( 2-6264
,2 NOW
THE MARINES' BATTLE CRY OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC!

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