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October 08, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

THE MICHIGAN DAILY __.,

Indiana University Sets
'Mock Election' Plans

University Owns Largest
Group of Instruments

..

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

KARL L. KING
..to lead massed bands

Guest Bands
To, Perform
Michigan's 12th annual Band.
Day will highlight the Duke-Mich-
igan football game this afternoon.
The bands, from high schools
all over the Lower Peninsula, will
perform during the pre-game cer-
emonies and at half-time.
The 1,500 twirlers in the group
will be featured along with the
Michigan Marching Band in pre-
game ceremonies. At half-time, the
188 bands with their 12,000 mem-
bers, will take the field. Karl L.
King, noted conductor and com-
poser, from Fort Dodge, Iowa, will
be guest director.
In addition to the pre-game and
half-time shows, the Royal Oak
Dondero High School Marching
Band, under the direction of Jo-
seph D. Parker, will perform after
the game.
The band will present an ex-
hibition of close-order precision
drill while playing a medley of
patriotic songs called "America on,
Parade."

BLOOMINGTON - Tentative
plans are being made for a mock
election at Indiana University.
The Student Senate last week
passed a mandate requiring the
student government executive to
investigate the possibility of a,
mock election between the presi-
dential candidates Richard M.
Nixon and John F. Kennedy.
Tentative plans have also been
made for other Big Ten schools
to hold mock elections on Novem-
ber 1.
The idea for the Big Ten co-
ordinated ''mock elections origi-
nated at the University of Illinois,
and the Daily Illini then notified
the Big Ten editors of the plan.
* * *
LOS ANGELES-The University
of California Board of Regents
will make a final decision this
fall on the controversial topic of
compulsory ROTC.
"How the Regents will vote, I
do not know," said University' of
California President Clark Kerr.
"But we expect a determination
of the issue and I am working
bard to this end.".
The last action taken by the
Regents was at a meeting last
spring when it was decided to
table the ROTC issue, pending
review of a full faculty committee
report and an analysis of a na'
tionwide conference at Ohio State
this summer on ROTC.
Student Parking
Lot to Open Soon
The new student off-street park-
ing lot will be available for stu-
dent use 'beginning October 10
from 7 a.m. to 12 midnight Mon-
day through Friday.
Entrances to the parking lot
will be from South Division Street,
South Fifth Ave., and Hill Street.

Kerr said that the Department
of Defense has issued some new
and pertinent comments on the
entire ROTC program which will
be reviewed by the Regents this
fall.
At present the main opposition
to voluntary ROTC is being made
by the Army. Naval and Air Force
officials have maintained that
their schools are able to secure
enough officers from schools where
the program is voluntary.
But the Army feels it cannot'
produce as many officers as it
needs from a voluntary ROTC
program.
The University of California is
required by the Morrill ,Land
Grant Act of 1862 to offer a cur-
riculum in militairy training.
And the Board of Regents de-
cided to make the Army and then
the Air Force programs compul-
sory for lower division male stu-

dents.
Students at the University of
California have opposed the com-
pulsory requirement for years. The
climax came last year when stu-
dent polls here and at UCLA
showed that 80 per cent of the
male student body thought ROTC
should be voluntary.
M S M
LANSING -- A change in the
ROTC program at Michigan State
has resulted in an increasing em-
phasis on tactics courses and a
lessening of emphasis on map-
reading and weapons instruction
courses.
The most significant changes,
according to Lt. Col.; Albert Gou-
dreau of the ROTC department,
are the adoption by the history
department of the one-term mili-
tary history course and the oppor-
tunity for one term of elective
study in the physical and social
sciences for the ROTC depart-
ment.
Goudreau refused to comment
on the issue of voluntary as op-
posed to compulsory ROTC, but
did say that shortening the pro-
gram to one year would place too
much burden on the summer
camp.
One of the biggest objections to
the compulsory program at Michi-
gan State is that it interferes with;
the heavy course requirements of
engineering students.
A conference sponsored by the
National Student Association has
upheld the action of the Daily
Illini, student newspaper of the
University of Illinois, in printing
the controversial letter of former
Illinois professor Leo 1. Koch.
Accused Seek
Change of Plea,

By RICHARD OSTLING
The largest group of historical
musical instruments in the Unit-
ed States is owned by the Uni-
versity, but is rarely noticed by
the public, except during concert
intermissions.
The Stearns Collection of mu-
;cal instruments, located in the
second-floor lobby of Hill Audi-
DAIL'Y
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
reau of Appointments, Ext. 3371 for
appointments at 10:00, 11:00, 2:00 or
3:00. Also a GENERAL MEETING will
be held for all interested seno;s and
underclassmen -at 4:00 p.m., Room 4051,
Admin. Bldg., jointly sponsored by the
Political Science Dept.
Picker X-Ray Corp., Cleveland-Op-
portunities at Picker Research Center
for qualified Physicists & Electrical
Engineers with electronic & nuclear in-
strumentation experience. M.S. or Ph.D.
degrees required,
Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., Philadelphia
-Attention M.S. & Ph.D. candidates
and recent grads: Opportunities in Re-
search & Development for chemists,
blo-chemists, pharmacologists & medi-
cal sciences.
Pleaae call the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, Rm. 4021 Admin. Bldg., Ext.
3371 for further details,
Stucdent .Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available to students. Applications for
these jobs can be made in the Non-
Academic Personnel Office, Room 1020
Administration Building, during the
following hours: Monday through Fri-
day, 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time work should contact Bill
Wenrich, Student Interviewer at NOr-
mandy 3-1511. extension 2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 1020, daily.

torium, is open to the public from
3 to 4 each Tuesday and Friday
afternoon.cThis year, an exhibit
of clarinets is being featured.
The special display, found at
the west end of the lobby, has
specimens ranging from the Egyp-
'tian zummarah, a single-reed an-
aestor of. the clarinet, to the mod-
ern instrument using the Boehm
fingering system.
Also in the exhibit are angular
bassetthorns, alto clarinets, and
mass clarinets.
In the various other cases, the
evolution of all instruments in the
modern symphony orchestra is
documented, featuring some most
unusual items. Other displays
show unusual Far Eastern, primi-
tive, medieval, string, and key-
board instruments, and music
boxes.
The Stearns instruments were
given to the University in 1899 by
a Detroit pharmacist who gather-
ed them as a hobby. Although oth-
er specimens have been added
since, the bulk of the items pres-
ently owned has been here for
60 years. Only half of the collec-
tion, a representative sampling,
is actually on display,
The earliest piece shown is part
of a mold-encrusted Roman flute,
about 2,000 years old. Like much'
of the collection, it is not in play-
ing condition.
Besides members of a University
class in instrument history, taught
by the collection's curator, Prof.
Robert Warner, visitors in recent
months have included musicolo-
gists from Venezuela and England,
the assistant curator of the Smith-
sonian Institution, and members
of the New York Pro Musica.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST, Blue wallet, on campus. Impor-
tant I.D., papers; return to Janet Bel,
linger, 1520 South University or cali
NO 5-8637. Reward. A23
LOST: Lady's gold watch. Round face
with gold rim. Worn black suede
band. Call 2324 Markley. A24
LOST: Girl's blue-framed glasses ..in
blue case, Call NO 3-1561, Ext. 149.
A25
LOST: Black GBD pipe on Saturday.
Call Larry at NO 3-1412. A22
LOST-Brown alligator wallet in or
near UGL. Call NO 2-2539. Reward.
A19,
BLACK SWEATER lost at History o0
exam. N.S. Aud, last June. Will person
who found it call or return it to lost
and foimd, 2nd floor Ad. Bldg. or
Mary, 587 Jordan. A14
LOST-Trench. coat left at UGL. Red
striped linin' , trade zip in lining for
cash. Call NO 3-6604 after 5 p.m. A18
LOST? To find yourself try the Michi-
gan Daily. Just find a telephone and
dial NO 2-3241. A3
FOUND: 30, Weeks (a full school year)
of interesting, newsy reading. This
was found on the Diag June 6, 1960,
and the owner is wanted desperately.
Please call NO 2-3241 for information,
and find a year's DAIL'Y subscription'
as a reward (only $7.00 too). A2
FOR RENT
2 RM. SUITE, private bath. Parking,
limited kitchen privileges. Quiet
house. 1001 S. Forest. C51
WANTED: Girl to share ground floor
apartment. Newly furnished. All utili-
ties included. Walking distance to
campus. NO 8-8634. C53
PAVED, off-street parking space 1 block
from campus. 702 E. University, Call
NO 5-7892. C5Z
ESPECIALLY NICE APARTMENT -
North side of Ann Arbor. 3-rm., bath
and garage. Air conditioned. Unfur-
nished except stove and refrigerator.

LINES
2
4

ONE-DAY
.80
.96b
1.12

ROOM AND BOARD
DESIRE ONE male roommate for nice
4 rm. apt. NO 3-3108. . E31
GIRL TO SHARE APARTMENT with
one other girl. $42.50 monthly, near
campus. Phone NO 3-7775 after 5. E30
SINGLE ROOM near campus. Linens
furnished. Phone Joe-NO 3-6229. E28
ROOM CLOSE TO CAMPUS, $6-7.
Linen furn. 1319 Hill St. NO 2-6422.
E15
WANTED: girl graduate student to
share room in new apartment. Full
use kitchen and living room. $37.50
a month, 718 Lawrence. Phone NO 5-
512 or NO 3-0787. E12
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGNCAR
SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
NYE MOTOR SALES
514 E Washington
Phone NO 3-4858

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
GRINNEL L"S PIANO
HARVEST OF VALUES
Beautiful Tickering Grand-6'6"
every piano student's dream
ONLY $1795
Other Grands from $345
Reconditioned Uprights-$69 up

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
.9
.47
,54

MAKE GRINNELL'S YOUR
PIANO HEADQUARTERS

323 S. Main

NO 2-

Such collections are rare in the Convenient to North Campus and1
United States. The groups at University Hospital. Lots of storage
space. $90, includes heat and water.
Princeton. Harvard, and the NO 5-6901. C49
Smithsonian are generally con-
sidered to be more valuable than CLOSE TO STATE THEATRE-t room
that of the University, although NO 2-7274. Call
not as extensive. - ___________
____et ___ NEW BRICK HOME: first floor un-
furnished except stove refrigerator

i
i
t
G

Read the Classifieds

, Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Call Classified between 1:00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phon4 NO 2.4786

I

(Author of "I Was a Teen- e arf" "The Man
Law of Dobie Gillis", etc,)

I

WHAT TO DO TILL THE
PSYCHIATRIST COMES
Once upon a time at the University of Virginia there was a
coed named, oddly enough, Virginia University who was hand-
some and kindly and intelligent and ingeniously constructed
and majoring in psychology. Virginia went steady with a young
man on campus named, oddly enough, Oddly Enough who was
supple and fair and lithe and animated and majoring in phys ed.
Virginia and Oddly enjoyed a romance that was as idyllic as
a summer day, as placid as a millpond. Never did they fight -
never, never, never!-because Virginia, who was majoring in
psychology, did not believe in fighting. "Fighting," she often
said, "settles nothing. The scientific way is to look calmly for
the cause of the friction."7
So whenever she and Oddly were on the Nerge of a quarrel,
she used to whip out a series of ink blot tests and they would
discover the true underlying cause of their dispute and deal
with it in an enlightened, dispassionate manner. Then, the
irritant removed, their romance would resume its tranquil,
serene, unruffled course.

MALE
2-Salesmen-graduate students pre- 1
ferred. commission basis.M usic Course
15-Psychological subjects.
3-Meal jobs.C
4-Waiters (meal hours, and evenings>
5--Cab drivers (evenings, and week-
ends).
8-Psychological subjects (any Tues- Modern music curriculum would
day or Thursday afternoons between be unrecognizable to students of
Oct. 5 and Oct. 20).
1-Sociology or Psychology major (eve- twenty years ago, Prof. John A.
nings and weekends, live in). Flower, assistant dean of the mu-
3-Salesmen (Sell membership into sic school, said yesterday in a!
Men's Health Club). %,
1-Linotype operator (experienced). speech before wives of University1
1-Housework (twice a week, 4 hours Press Club members.
per day, flexible),
4-Stockboys (hours' flexiblel. "These changes in music cours-
1-Hotel desk-clerk (full days, alter- es do not reflect a basic change1
n FEMALE in the structure of the art itself,I
13-Guides-upperclass biological sci- in contrast to changes in science
ence majors. courses which frequently reflect
3--Room jabs. basic alterations in the very con-
1-Telephone solicitor (as many hours cuyts of science," he explained.
4-Housework and ironing (hours flex- "The substance of art remains'
ible). one of the most edrn values!
4-Waitresses (meal hours, and eve- m n d t ost ndrits dis
nlings) mankind possesses, and its disci-
8-Psychological subjects (any Tues- plines remain much the same
day or Thursday afternoon between throughout the years, It is in its
12-Psychological subjects. applications to a constantly

and drapes. 4 large rooms and bath.
Private entrance, utilities furnished.
Couples preferred. NO 2-2982 after
5 P.M. C45
FIVE-ROOM heated apt., 2 baths. Farm
nine miles from campus. Swimming,
fishing, horseback riding. $80. NO
3-6578. C40
WOMEN: Very large furnished room at
Whitmore Jake. Boat beach. and
kitchen priveleges. Transportation to
Ann Arbor can be 'arranged to fit
most any schedule. Call HI 9-2387
after 3 p.m. C37
TWO-ROOM furnished apt. with pri-
vate bath Everything included except
as for cooking. $65 a month. NO
2-0342 after 5: C41
ATTRACTIVE apartment facing Huron
River, 11j mile from campus. Available
to young, reflined couple. NO 3-5126.
C36
HOUSE -) bedroom. New oil furnace.
New ly decorated. Furnished or unfur-
nished. $75 per month. Off Highway
23 between Ann Arbor and Brighton
EL 6-8995. C25

i

i

Three University students ac-

I

cused of taking kitchenware from
the Ann Arbor Veterans of For-
eign Wars Halls are seeking to Organizaion
have their guilty pleas set aside.
The students, Brad Myers, '60, Notices
Gerald Kolb, '60, and Richard _
Buck, '61, maintain that they Onereg
not fairly represented by council USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
in their first court appearance. nents is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
SMunicipal Judge Francis L. Ognztospann to be active for
O'Brien will rule next Wednesday the fall semester should register by
on their motion. The three indi- OCTOBER 10, 1960. Forms available,
cated they now wish to plead in- 3011 Student Activities Building.
Newman Club, Dunker's Hour after
nocent. Duke Game, Oct. 8, 331 Thompson St.

changing society that adaptations
inevitably appear."j
Prof. Flower noted an increas-
ing awareness of music in Ameri-
ca, and cited as an effect of this

ONE BLOCK from campus - Modern
apartment. Newly furnished. NO 2-
1443. CIO
PARKING SPACE and garage. One block
from campus. 514 S. Forest. Phone NO
2-1443 C
USED CARS

a mushroom growth of active -
music centers, usually on college VOLKSWAGEN, 2 years old, excellent
campuses, which make available condition, $1200. L915 Scottwood, NO
to their surrounding areas a va- x--- N37
riety of choral groups, bands and 55 AUSTIN HEALY, Good cond., no
orchestras, opera workshops, sing- ru Phone NO 8-8253 between.M4
ers and instrumentalists of all
sorts." '60 CORVETTE, low mileage. Like new.
., R & H, w.w,. NO 3-8000. Dave Valen-
Obviously, local talent will tine after 7 p.m. N38
never substitute for a Tebaldi,
Hess or Casale," he said, "But END PARKING, transportation woes!
the . iniiul uiin-boh Buy my 1957 Allstate (vespa) Cruis-
the individual musicians-both aire scooter. Thrifty. Excellent cond.
student and faculty-currently Extras. $200. NO 5-6557. N4
emerging are frequently on a par '55 DODGE Hardtop Lancer. Below
with the lesser known names on wholesale. NO 2-1644, 2870 Easy. N36
eastern concert agency lists."

84
PERSONAL
BLOCK "M" TODAY
,? P113
FRANK: Big Daddy gays, "Your time
is running out. P114
HAVE FUN, RITA. Filo
FREE! FREE! FREE!.
Call NO 5-5986
FREE! FREEI
F109
If you can't get, it free there,
call NO 2-7776.
FREE! FREE! FREE!
F108
IT'S A KNOWN FACT THAT , . . a
diag name-is no claim to fame. P111
BLOCK M MEMBERS!
Important-your pictures are being
taken for Detroit, Daily, and Ann
Arbor papers! You must-simply
MUST-wear white shirts or sweat-
ers AND BRING YOUR POMPQMS!
F112
ALTERATIONS and sewing. Mrs. Sny-
der, NO 2-7968. P3
FIRESIDE FORUM. Christian Fellow-
ship. Prof. Andrei Lobanov-tostov-
sky'. "Reminiscence of Russian Revo-
lution." Sun., Oct. 9 7:30 P.M. First
Methodist Church. 120 S. State. F99
ALL-CAMPUS Bowling League-Teams
and individual people interested be
at Union Bowling Alley, 6:30, Oct. 12,
or contact S. Case, NO 3-9452. P100
DON'T DELAY. Get your tickets for the
Shelly Berman concert, coming next
Wednesday, right away. F105
ENTERTAINMENT at Cafe Promethean
every Friday and Saturday evening.
F106
FRENCH CLASSES by native teacher.,
Small groups, any age 4-70. Day or
evening. Call 8 a.m.-8 p.m. NO 2-9541.
P72
PALEFACE--don't resort to the bottle,
get the real thing. An all-expense
paid trip to Miami on Oct. 14-16 for
$99. Cost includes non-stop flights,
hotels, meals, and a Saturday night
tour of the night clubs. Contact
Alva's Travel Agency. NO 2-1006. F83
COMING-the outside, inside, and edge.
F55
FOR THE FINEST in music and enter-
tainment contact the Bud-Mor Agen-
cy, featuring the BollWeevils, Johnny
Harvard, Dick Tilkin, the Kingsmen,
Ray Lewis, Al Young, Al Blaser, Men
of Note plus many others. 1103 South
University. NO 2-6362. F57
FOLK MUSIC CONCERT with Mike
Seeger, Fri., Oct. 14, 8:30 in Union
Ballroom. Tickets only 90c on sale
at Union desk and the Disc Shop. F89
'TIS BUT A DROP IN THE BUCKET
that spreads a wave of goodwill.
J.I.F.C. P88
BUS)NESS PERSONAL
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Unl-
versity, NO 8-8887. FF2

A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
,Rental Purchase Plan-
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
FOR SALE
3 SINGLE MATTRESSES and bra
new Slide Rule, 25 scales. NTO 5-94
B
USED GE 21" television at $49.50. A
used refrigerators from $29.50. H.
Johnson Co., 211 S. Fourth. NO
4124.B
USED CARPETING and padding, 28
17'. NO 3-4187, ask for Ernie. .
ALL KINDS of old books at'the Armo
Antique Show. Fri., Sat., Sun., No
to 10 p.m. B
FOR SALE-Evergreens by employee
cheprtistry stores at wholesale to Un
versity personnel. Priced at $2.00
$5.00. Junipers, yews, arborvit
spreaders, uprights, globes, dwar
Call Michael Lee at NO 8-8574. B
TAPE RECORDER. Knight. Tape, mi
headphones and phono cord. $75. N
3-6448. R
FOR SALE -- Automat~c washing ir
chine, Frigidsire, 3 years oldCa
NO 3-6995 after 6 p.m. B
PHOTO SUPPLIES-
LEICA M3, NIKKOR f2.5 tele., and otk
like-new equipment, Value $725,0
Best offer over $425. Box 2, Daily.I
BUSINESS SERVICES
ORNITHOLOGICAL engineers! Does
really fly? Your opinion and observ,
tions of "Lumbards" at 1225 S. Un
versity is welcomea.
ON YOUR WAY TO=THE GAME, b
your cider at Ralph's Market, T
Packard, NO 5-7131. Open every nig

'til midnight.

IOF

YW W W r r v ~ y . - - - - - - - - - -

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Ieoeycr ~ r'

After six months of this sedate liaison, Oddly was so bored
he could spit. He loved Virginia well enough, but he also be-
lieved that people in love ought to fight now and then. "It
opens the pores," he said. "And besides, it's so much fun mak-
ing up afterwards."
But Virginia would not be provoked into a quarrel. One night
Oddly tried very hard. "Hey," he said to her, "your nose looks
like a banana, and your ears look like radar antenna, and your
face looks like a pan of worms."
"My goodness, we're hostile tonight !" said Virginia cheerfully
and whipped 120 Rorschach cards out of her reticule. "Come,'
she said, "let us examine your psychic apparatus."
Oddly tried again. "You're fat and dumb and disagreeable,"
he said, "and you'll be bald before yof're thirty."
"Hmm," said Virginia thoughtfully and lit a cigarette. "This
sounds like an anxiety neurosis with totemism, anagogic trauma,
and a belt in the back."
"I hate you," said Oddly. "I hate your looks and your clothes
and your toenails and your relatives and the cigarettes you
smoke."
"Now, hold on, buster!" cried Virginia, her eyes crackling,
her color mounting, her nostrils aflame. "Just keep a civil
tongue in your stupid head when you talk about Marlboro!
Nobody's knocking that filter, that flavor, that pack or flip-top
box while there's breath in my body! It's a full-flavored smoke,
it's a doozy, it's a dilly, it's a gas -and anybody who says a
word against it gets this"
By "this" Virginia meant a series of combinations to the
head and liver, which she now delivered to Oddly and turned
on her heel and stormed away. . ,

Starting next Friday morning, The Daily will publish an
"On the House" column listing social events sponsored by the various
housing groups for the coming weekend--picnics, dances. parties.
Fraternities, sororities, dormitory groups, co-ops and other
living units are welcome to publicize their coming events in this
column.
Necessary information may be filled in on forms available at the
Student Publications Bldg., second floor. These forms must be
returned to The Daily office before.5 p.m. of the Wednesday preceding
the event. Read and take advantage of "On the House" beginning
next Friday on these pages.
For those who were unfortunate enough
not to get a bike at the auction, we have
new ones.
THE POPULAR SPECIAL
(A Raleigh Product)

FOR
RENTI

RENAULT DAUPHINE, 60, under 7000
miles, automatic clutch, radio, white,
$1570. DUnkirk 3-7550. Melvindale.
Call 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Ni
1953 MERCURY. Good running condi-
tion. Best reasonable offer accepted.
Call NO 5-8435 after 6 p.m. N35
11957 SUN-ROOF Volkswagen in good
condition. Best offer. NO 3-8825. N33
'52 FORD 2-DOOR V-8. Radio and
heater, fordomatic. Phone NO 3-1419.
X31
The fabulous
SHELLEY
BERMAN
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Wed., Oct. 12-8:30 p.m.

Typewriter sales, service-, and rent-
als. That's our business. MOR-
RILL'S at 314 South State Street
-across from thei dime store.
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St. NO 3-2481
J2
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth hol
rewoven. Let us save your clothe
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcad
NO 2-4647.,Jl
FALL BARGAIN CARNIVAL SALE
30-qt. Plastic Waste Basket 1.99
Plastic Pali 77c
Plastic Laundry Basket 99c
O-Cedar Sponge Mop 2.44
Laundry Cart 2.99
MUEHLIG & LANPHEAR HARDWAR
311 S. Main St.
SELFESERVICE Westinghouse Laundre
mat. 24 washers, 8 dryers. AIway
open. 229 Depot St, Ann Arbor. Sta
St. north to Depot St., turn left 1
blocks.
BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$7.95; sock
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
SAM'S STORE, 122 X. Washington
.W
BIKES and SCOOTERS
LAMBRETTA MOTOR SCOOTER. 150-1
Excellent condition, $155. Call N
2-7395 after 6 p.m. ,
HELP WANTED
STUDENTS AND YOUNG WOMEN
18 years and over
to work part time: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. or,
1 p.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Telephone
inquiries from our office. Salary.
Located at E. Liberty anct Division,
For interview call NO 2-7211.
SECRETARIAL help wanted. Quaufle
secretary needed in modern, new, we
equipped office. Call NO 5-6103 c
NO 2-2761. Hl

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THE NEWEST
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These days a typewriter is a
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25900 Outer Dr. DU 6-0699
Lincoln Park - Outer Dr. of Fort

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