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October 08, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG? N DAILY

ue Devil Offense Built
ound the'Lonesome End'

Service Schools Defend 3-0 Marks

(Continued from Page 1)
aimey has been running this
It in McRae's slot and will
bably share duties there today.
Tureaud Out
efinitely out of the lineup for
opening kickoff today is full-
k Ken Tureaud. The junior
erman suffered a hip injury
Inst MSU.
is loss will be a serious blow
he Wolverines on offense and
ense alike. Expected to per-
m adequately on offense this
r, he has more than lived up
these expectations. He leads
squad in ground gaining, de-
be his early-game injury at
t Lansing, with 107 yards.
.e graduate of the "Raiders"
also been a bulwark on de-
se.
xpected to be a capable re-
cement is Rudd VanDyne, who
raged over five yards a carry
inst MSU. He carried seven
ies for 35 yards and gathered in
9pass.
knother 'game-time decision on
starting lineup will be made
Elliott concerning the left end
t. John Halstead and Scott
,entz will provide him with the

was cut down by a leg infection
before the Oregon opener. Since
then he has made only spot ap-
pearances, booting five cohver-
sions and a pair of field goals in
two games.

Strong Replacement
Maentz has looked strong as a
replacement, making Elliott's de-
cision at that slot a hard one, but
somewhat more pleasant, than his
backfield problems.
Comparing Duke with Michi-
gan's other non-league rival, Ore-
gon, Elliott indicates that he ex-
pects the Blue Devils to field "a
lot better team" than the aggre-
gation of Ducks that Michigan
stopped, 21-0.
The Wolverines drilled for a
little over half an hour yesterday.
Elliott ran his squad through of-
fensive and defensive patterns,
practicing protection a g a i n st
Duke's heralded "lonesome end"
Halstead spent a period of time
keeping his educated toe warmed
for today's encounter, kicking
field goals for a quarter of an
hour.
Ticket Manager Don Weir ex-
pects a crowd of over 70,000 for
the 1:30 clash, includingbetter
than 13,500 high school bandsmen
here for the annual Band Day.

By BRIAN MacCLOWRY
College football moves into an-
other big weekend today with all
eyes focused on the military
academies, who will be shooting
for another three game sweep this
weekend.
Not since the Air Force Acade-
my came into existence has the
big three gone undefeated into the
second week of October.
Sixth ranked Navy, if they are
not caught looking forward to the
Air Force next week, should have,
the easiest time today when they
meet Southern Methodist.at Nor-
folk, Virginia.
Three Straight

15-14 upset of highly ranked
Washington 1 a st week, and
shouldn't have to rely on the toe
of Greg Mather against the Mus-
tangs.
Mather, incidentally, is probably
the only second string lineman
ever to win the Associated Press'
lineman of the week award.
Bill Meeks' SMU club, on the
other hand, is having one of its
worst years. His Mustangs have
yet to score a point this season.
At Colorado Springs the Air
Force wil have the toughest time
staying unbeaten as they meet
another undefeated team in Mis-
souri.
The Cadets have upended Colo-
rado. 32-6, and Stanford, 32-9.
Missouri's biggest problem will be

stopping the airborn antics of
Cadet quarterback Rich Mayo.
The Tigers, a definite title
threat in the rejuvenated Big
Eight Conference, have scored
three impressive victories over
SMU 20-0, Oklahoma State, 28-7,
and Penn State, 20-8.
Army, who came from behind
last week to top California, 28-10,
will meet once beaten Penn State.
Two Unbeatens
In another battle of the unbeat-
ens, Arkansas meets Baylor in a
game that could - produce the
favorite in the unpredictable'
Southwest Conference.
The Razorbacks, a 5% point-
favorite; will be taking the second
step in its three week walk down
the Southwest Conference's mur-
derer's row.

Last week they beat TCU 7-0
and next week they meet the pre-
season 'favorite Texas.
Baylor became a contender last
week when they beat LSU, 7-3.
In the television game of the
week (3:45 p.m. EST) Stanford's
passing whiz Dick Norman will try
to calm Washington's Huskies,
upset victims of Navy last week.
In a Big Eight titanic, beaten
but not disgraced Kansas meets
undefeated Iowa State in a game
that should bust the Iowa lubble.
Eighth ranked Clemson will al-
most have a bye today when they
meet Virginia. The Cavaliers own
the nation's longest major losing
streak, which now stands at 28
games.

The Middies
opponents this

have sunk three
year including a

r"

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11'

-David Oitrow
LIMITED ACTION-Junior fullback Keh Tureaud is still being
bothered by a hip injury sustained against Michigan State and
will see limited service against Duke today. Bill Tunnicliff, an-
other junior, will replace him.

Halstead was expected to be the
gular left flanker this year. but

$ , "

.4{1Wi }W M ra4vaarrv . vas+rr y ....... . , w. ---- - -- - -- --

)SU Plays Illini, Iowa at State in Big 10
.> -

By BOB ROMANOFF
Four Conference tilts are on
ap for today and in not one of
hem is it possible to pick a sure
winner.
Probably the two games which
will generate the most national
interest are Ohio State at Illinois
and Iowa at Michigan State. All
our of these teams are considered
strong contenders for the Big 10
itle as well as three of them
being listed in the AP's Top Ten,
while the fourth, MSU, is listed
is 14th.
At Champaign in a homecoming
battle which opens the champion-
ship play for both teams fourth-
ranked Illinois takes on fifth-

ranked Ohio State in a game
which matches two teams who
thus far this season have combined
explosive offenses with stingy
defenses.
Star Quarterback
The Illini against Indiana,
whose games don't count in the
standings, and West Virginia have
scored 50 points while giving up
but six. Their offense led by
senior quarterback John Easter-
brook, who leads the team in scor-
ing, passing and ground gaining,
have gained 739 net yards to 338
for the opposition. 158-pound,
Esterbrook has scored 18 points,
gained 103 yards rushing and

completed nine of 14 passes for
167 yards.
Ohio State, who are reputed to
have one of Woody Hayes' finest
teams enter the game ranked as
the eighth best defensive team in
the nation. Neither Southern
Methodist or Southern California
were able to score against them
and were held to only 296 yards to
668 yards for the Buckeyes.
The mainstay of the Buckeye
offense ,is fullback Bob Ferguson,
who has gained 246 yards for a
7.2 average per carry. He had also
crossed the goal line four times.
At East Lansing the Spartans
will have their hands full in con-
taining the third-ranked Hawk-
e$es, who some sportswriters claim
have the fastest backfield in Big
10 history. . Iowa, who shocked
Northwestern last week, 42-0, have,
had their backs score three touch-
downs in two games on plays
covering over 50 yards each.
New Kicker for MSU

Charon and Ron Hatcher who
wrecked Michigan last week will
share the fullback post.
At Minnesota, Northwestern,
still smarting from the Iowa de-
bacle, will be out to prove that
they're not that bad by upending
a surprizingly strong Gopher
team which has maintained a
perfect slate against Nebraska and
Indiana.
The Wildcats' hopes ride mainly
on whether All-American quarter-
back candidate Dick Thornton will
be sufficiently recovered from his
leg injury to see action. Two other
question marks are starting full-
back Mike Stock and starting half-
back Albert Kimbrough. At the,
moment Coach Ara Parseghian is
pessimistic about the amount of
action they will see. Minnesota is
ranked ninth in the country andj
is reputed to have one of the
biggest lines in the Big 10.
Purdue Favored
At Madison, seventh - ranked
Purdue faces Wisconsin in the
Conference opener for both teams.
The Boilermakers, who are riding
high as the result of a 51-19
shellacking of Notre Dame last
Saturday, are considered a slight

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND;
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
br. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
."When Life Out-Runs Your Knowledge-
What then?" Dr. Rupert preaching.
10:15 Seminar: Discussion on major religions
of the world. Zoroastrianism, Mr. and Mrs.
Dinshaw Contractor leading the discussion.
5:30 Fellowship Supper.
7:00 Worship and Program. "Is Disarmament
Possible?" Dr. James Morgan, professor of
economics speaking.
Wednesdays-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (over in
time for 8:p0 classes).-
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
9:45 Student Bible Class taught by Prof. Ed-
gar Willis in the Campus Center.
11:00 Worship, "Listen, God Speaks," Mr.
Hugh D. Pickett, preaching.
5:00 American Baptist Student Fellowship
Cabinet dinner at Picketts.
6:45 A.B.S.F. "Christian Ethics" Part I. "The
Ethics of the Church," a play reading "The
Church Militant."
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hiill Street
NO 2-9890
Meetings for Worship at 10:00 and 11:30.
Adult Forum'10:00 A.M.
Young Friends will meet at the center at 6:00
P.M. to go to Buildings' Home for Supper,
2670 Bedford Rd. Speaker-Elise Boulding.
Topic-Implications of the Friends Peace
Testimony for the Family.
A Sacrifice Supper will be observed. Proceeds
to go to the United Nations Work for Peace.

TO)

C~ H URrHl

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John Fauser, Assistant
Sunday Masses at 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12 noon,
12:30.
Holyday Masses at 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, ?:00, 12
noon and 5 p.m.
Daily Masses at 6:30, 8:00 and 9:00:
Rosary and Litany: daily at 5:00 P.M.
Novena Devotions in honor of Our Mother of
SPerpetual Help: Wednesday evening at
7:30..
Classes at the Gabriel Richard Center each
week:
Monday: Fundamentals of the Catholic'
Faith at 8:00 P.M.
Tuesday: Philosophy of Man at 6:45 P.M.
Nursing Ethics at 7:00 P.M.
Foundations of Christianity at 8:00 P.M.
Thursday: Sacred Scripture at 4:00 P.M.
Medical Ethics at 8:00 P.M.
This week:
Sunday, October 9-Communion Breakfast
after 9:30 Mass.
Foreign Students to Siena Heights.
Evening of Recollection.
Wednesday, October 12-Lecture: "Crea-
tion and Evolution."
Friday, October 14 - Newman Initiation
Ball at 8 P.M.
Saturday, October 15-Dunk'er's Hour 'aft-
er Duke Game.

FREE ADMISSION:
Ann Arbor Rugby Club
Plays Guelph University

4 Htr

By JAN WINKELMAN
The Ann Arbor Rugby Club
which represents the University:
of Michigan, will host the highly
touted Guelph University Squad{
from, Guelph, Ontario this after-
noon at Wines Field immediately
following the Michigan - Duke,
football game. There is no admis-
sion charge to this, the opening
game of the 1960 fall Rugby sea-
son.
Tomorrow Ann Arbor meets the
St. Catherine Wasps, composed of
former University of Toronto var-
sitymen.
Admission. is also free' to the
contest which begins at 2:30 p.m.
and will be played at Wines Field.
All Big 10
Acting captain for the current,
season, which lasts through
November, is Francie Gutman,
former all Big 10 football
quarterback from Purdue, who is
currently enrolled in Law School
here at the University. Other
outstanding men are Terry Robin-
son and Whata Whiniata. Robin-
son starred at Queens College in
Northern Ireland and is studying
Greek here as a Fulbright Scholar.
, Whinata was captain of the
highly respected Wellington Uni-
versity of New Zealand VIugby
Team. A more familiar squad
member to Wolverine fans is foot-
ball letter winner Harry Newman,

Jr. Other members of the Ann
Arbor Rugby Club represent the
Medical, Law, Business Adminis-
tration and undergraduate schools
of the University.
Although not extremely popular
in the United States, the game
of rugby is the highest drawing
spectator sport in England and
other .parts of the British Com-
monwealth. Rugby is the fore-
runner of American football and
consists of two 35 minute halves
of continuous action.
No Padding
The game is similar to football
as played in the U.C., but is
played with 15 men wearing no
heavy, protective padding. Iron-
ically, the sport of rugby has
become popular as an off-season
conditioner for American football
players.
The Ann Arbor Club toured the
West Coast this spring encounter-
ing UCLA, Pomona College, and
San Diego State. The present
squad which is composed of many
of the players who went to the
west coast, tentatively plans to
tour Bermuda this coming spring,
but has not ruled out offers from
East and West coast groups in-
terested in high caliber competi-
tion. Following the spring tour,
the squad will begin competition
for the spring half of the split
season.

State coach Duffy Daughterty
in an attempt to prevent a repeti-
tion of last week's 99-yard kickoff
runback by Michigan's Dennis
Fitzgerald, by one or more of the

Hawkeye speedsters, has gone to favorite although they have failed
the varsity soccer team for help. to win a game at Madison since
31-year-old, Cecil Herons, from 1945.
the Bahamas, who has never play- Wisconsin's hopes of upsetting
ed football could well become Purdue will rest mainly on the
State's "man of the hour." Not arm of sophomore quarterback
one of the Spartans' regular sensation, Ron Miller. In victories
booters have been able to prevent over Stanford and Marquette he
kickoff runbacks by putting the has completed 25 for 44 passes
ball into the end zone. In fact for 385 yards and four touch-
six times in two games the ball downs.

has been returned beyond the
30-yard line. In practfee Heron
has been booting the ball 70 yards.
Michigan State will counter with
some speed of their own. Junior
back Gary Ballman ran with the
first unit for the first time this
year this week in practice. He is
fully recovered from a leg ailment.
He will team with Herb Adderley
at halfback. Junior fullbacks Carl
The fabulous
SHELLEY
BERMAN
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Wed., Oct. 12-8:30 p.m.

In inter-sectional clashes Michi..
gan plays host to Duke and In-
diana opens its new $4.5 million,
48,000 seat stadium by entertain-
ing Oregon State. who has posted
a 2-1 record with victories over
Southern California and Houston,
while losing to Iowa. Indiana will
be looking for their first win after
bowing to Illinois, 17-6 and Min-
nesota, 42-0.

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GUILD HOUSE
'524 Thompson
Associated with the First Congregational
Church, Memorial Christian Church and
Bethlehem Evangelical Reformed Church.
Sunday 9:30 a.m. seminar beginning Sept. 25
at Guild House
Tuesdays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion at
Guild House
Tuesdays 4:30 coffee break
Fridays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday services
8:00 p.m. Wednesday services
9:30 a.m. Sunday school (adults up to 20
years old)
.11:00 a.m. Sunday school (children 2 to 6
years old)
A reading room is maintained at 306 E
Liberity, 10:00 to 5:00 daily except Sun-
days and holidays 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.,
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Training Union 6:30 p.m.
Evenijng Worship 7:30 p.m.
.Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p.m.
Vespeers, Lane Hall, Tues., Fri. 5:15-5:45
p.m.
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist Con-
vention.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 3-0589
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 Church School.
8:45 & 11:00 Morning Worship Service. "The
Sower Went Forth To Sow"-Rev. Bennett.
5:45 Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 Evening Service. "Motivation."-Rev.
Morgan.
7:30 Wednesday Prayer Meeting.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Sundays--
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-1
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor.
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 A.M. Seminar; Biblical Thought; Rev. J.
Edgar Edwards at Guild House, 524 Thomp-
son St.
10:45 A.M. Seminar: What a Christian Be-
lieves, Miss Nancy Prime at Bethlehem
Church.
Morning Worship: 9:30 & 10:45 A.M. Rev.-
Ernest R. Klaudt.
7:30 P.M. Evening Guild; The Organization
Man; Mr. James Elsman.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
College Class 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11,:00 'A.M.
Wednesday Evening Discussion 7:00 P.M.
(E. Stanley Jones book, "Christian
Maturity")
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:30 A.M. Seminar; Biblical Thought; Rev. J.
Edgar Edwards at Guild House, 524 Thomp-
son St.
Morning Worship: 11:00 A.M. Rev. Russell Ful-
ler.
7:30 P.M. Evening Guild; The Organization
Man; Mr. James Elsman.

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Wmn. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Services: 9:00, 10:00, 11:00 A.M.
9:00 A.M. and-10:30 A.M.: Dr. Henry Kul-
zenga preaching: "The Writers."
11:50 A.M.: Rev. Jack Borckardt preaching:
"A Disturbing "Experience."
CAMPUS CENTER SCHEDULE
Sunday, Oct. 9
10:30 A.M. Adult Class. Teacher: Prof. A.
K. Stevens. Curtis Room.
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour in French Room.
6:00 P.M. P.S.F. Forum for Dinner. Busi-
ness and Social Meeting.
TUESDAY, OCT. 11
7:30 P.M. Faith and Existentialism. Teacher:
a Pat Pickett, Lane Hall.
9:00 P.M. "Coffe and Conversation," at Pat
P.ickett"s apartment, 217 S. Observatory.
THURSDAY, OCT. 13
4:15 P.M. The Dilemma of the Reformers.
Rev. Leonard Verduin, League, Conference
Room No. 2.
7:00 P.M. Seminar ,in Chaffee Room. Basic
Christian Beliefs.
FRIDAY, OCT. 14
6:15 P.M. Grad Group Dinner. Prof. A. K.
Stevens; "A Christian Society."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL .
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur L. Dauer, Vicar
Elizabeth Lamb, Director of Music
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
with the pastor speaking on "Our Liturgical
Legacy."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible study groups.
Sunday at 5:30: Orientation for those wishing
to join Gamma Delta.
Sunday at 6:0: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program, with re-
ception of new members in candlelight
ceremony.
Tuesday at 8:00: Pastor's Information Class.
Wednesday at 6:00: Married Students' Potluck
Supper. Phne NO 3-5560 by Tuesday night
for reservation.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Services 9:30 and 1,1:00 A.M. "If I Had the
Time," D.r Fre E. Luchs.
Bible Lecture by Dr. Preston Slosson 10:20.
10:40.
Coffee Hour following 9:30 service-Students
Welcome.
Church School: 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-12:00,
Crib-12th Grade.
Student Guild:524 Thompson; 7:30 P.M.
Evening vespers by Dr. Luchs broadcast at 5:45
WOIA, 1290.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sunday- I
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper followed by program.
7:00 P.M. Rev. H. 0. Yoder, speaker: "Our
Experience in Europe" (colored slides)
8:30 P.M. Communion.
Tuesday-
7:15 P.M. Teachings of the Various De-
nominations.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Sunday worship 11:00 P.M. Sermon topic: "Re
ligious Liberalism and the New World Or-
der." Dr.' Eare Zeigler.
Professor 0. L. Chavarrie-Aguilir,, Adult Dis-
cussion Group-"Unitarian Views on Reli-
gious Education."
Sunday evening student group 7:00 P.M. Group
discussion on aims and goals.
Transportation available at 6:45 from quads,
Alice Lloyd, Vaughn, and Stockwell.

i

ATTENTIONcUSHEES:
October 2, 1960

Dear Rushee:

As chapter presidents in the Michigan Fraternity System, we heartily welcome you to the
forthcoming rushing periods and generally appreciate your interest in becoming better acquaint-
ed with us. We regard your decision to rush as a wise one-a decision which might well open
to you a fuller and more enjoyable life on this campus.
We hope also that, should you decide to pledge, your decision will be a wise one and given
the careful consideration that il deserves. Our own rushing experience has shown us that the
rushee who patiently and objectively makes his decision for a particular house seldom regrets
such a decision. It is with this fact in mind that WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU NOT
ACCEPT ANY BID UNTIL MONDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF RUSH. We would
also emphasize the fact that no bid is officially recognized by the Interfraternity Council until
Wednesday of the second week.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:0 P M Fveninn Worshin

CAMPUS CHAPEL

Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH
216 Beakes St.
Welcomes Students

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