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September 30, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TONIGHT
)HN KENNETH GALBRAITH
Professor of Economics, Harvard University
Economic Advisor to John F. Kennedy
4NEDY OR NIXON: IS THERE A DIFFERENCE?"
8:30 P.M. ANN ARBOR HIGH SCHOOL

DISPUTE ENDED?
Pittsfield Township May
Give City Researcb Park

BUSSES
Alice Lloyd Hall - 7:50 P.M.
Michigan Union - 8:10 P.M.
But Cost: 25c

STUDENTS FOR KENNEDY
YOUNG DEMOCRATIC CLUB
2534 S.A.B. NO 5-5875

An apparent compromise be-
tween officials of Ann Arbor and
Pittsfield Township may have
resolved the dispute over releas-
ing 386 acres of township land to
the city, 210 acres of it for a city
research park.
Four members of the seven-
member township board are "in
favor of the research park" and
thus may be expected to vote ap-
proval of the annexation at the
Oct. 14 township board meeting,
Township Clerk T. Bruce Rider
said yesterday.
The four members made their
favorable positions subject to two
conditions the city must meet:
1) Pay $2,700 to improve the
section of S. State Road which

would become part of the city if
the acreage a mile south of the
city is released for annexation.
2) The City Council adopt a
zoning statement guaranteeing
that township land near the area
under consideration would not be
"damaged" by light industry pro-
posed for the research park.
City Administrator Guy C. Lar-
com, Jr., has indicated that the
city council would be agreeable to
the two conditions.
"The University has an inter-
est in the research park inasmuch
as the University always looks
favorably on research activities,"
Vice President for Research Ralph
A. Sawyer has said.

JOSH WHITE
Saturday, October 29, 1960
8:30 P.M.
Ann Arbor High Auditorium
ALL SEATS RESERVED

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GRAD MIXER
September 30, 1960 ...9-12 P.M.
Music by The MEN of NOTE
V.F.W. CLUB
314 E. Liberty
Presented By The
GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL

$1.75

$2.25

$2.75

$3.75

i

Mersereau
Introduces
Dostoevsky
By JUDITH OPPEDHEIM
"Crime and Punishment" is a
unique combination of many in-
gredients: A blend of adventure
and intrigue, psychology, religion,
philosophy, sociology, and poli-
tics," Prof. John Mersereau of
the Slavic languages department
said yesterday.
Prof. Mersereau's talk was an
introduction to a series of five
SGC-sponsored seminars on Dos-
toevsky's novel, "Crime and Pun-
ishment."
During the next two weeks,
Prof. James Gindin of the Eng-
lish department, Prof. Paul Henle
of the philosophy department,
Prof. Mersereau, Prof. James Mei-
sel of the political science depart-
ment and Prof. Joseph Adelson of
the psychology department will
discuss the book from the stand-
point of their individual fields of
specialization.
Since he was introducing the se-
ries, Prof. Mersereau limited his
talk to the art of Dostoevsky and
the nature of the crime Raskolni-
kov, the hero, commits.
"In all Dostoevsky's great nov-
els, crime, and in particular mur-
der, plays an enormous role," he
said. "In taking murder, however,
Dostoevsky did not treat the
theme from the point of view of
the victim, but that of the mur-
der, and for good reason."
Prof. Mersereau quoted the;
author Thomas de Quincy as say-
ing that in a good novel, the read-
er's sympathy of comprehension
must be with the murderer. In the
murderer, there must be a storm
of passions which create a per-
sonal hell into which the reader is
permitted to look.
Raskolnikov's apparent motives
for killing a wealthy old pawn
broker ranged from a need for
money to a need for self-destruc-
tion, and included two outstand-
ing philosophical concepts.
The first was Raskolnikov's "su-
perman theory" which the hero
believed gave certain individuals
the right to transcend the boun-
daries of common morality.
The second concept was Dos-
toevsky's theory that "man is not
born for happinfess, an earns his
happiness, and alwt:ays by suffer-
Ing.
IPAPER-BOUND I

Academic Life Freer in U.S.

By ANDREW HAWLEY
While the academic side of an
American student's college life is
more strictly controlled than that
of a student in Great Britain, the
American is generally freer, a
Cambridge University graduate
studying at the University said
recently. .
Peter A. R. Calvert is spending
a year as a teaching fellow in

.

There are closer ties among
graduate students, and between
the students and the University
itself here than in Great Britain,
he said. "While the graduates in:
England are more or less left to
sink or swim, the University
shows appreciation of the prob-
lems of the graduate student."
British students do not devote
as much time to extra-curricular
activities as do Americans, but
there is considerable interest in
such things as the "Varsity," the
university newspaper; sports; and
the Union, a debating society dat-
ing back to 1815.
More Politically Active
Cambridge students are much
more politically active than Amer-
icans seem to be, he said. The
Liberal Club, of which Calvert was
president, included 1,100 of Cam-
bridge's 8,000 students at the time.
There are also a Conservative and.
a Labor Club.
All three are closely connected
with the parallel national parties,
and provide important recruitirg
grounds for them, as does the
Union.
Although the gapbetween the
student and professor is much
wider at Cambridge than here,
there is none between the univer-
sity teacher and the rest of the
people, Calvert pointed out. There
is no anti-intellectual feeling in
Britain.
Calvert is living in one of the
University residence hals, which,
while "thoroughly overcrowded,"
he finds excellent accommoda-
tions, with a pleasant atmosphere.
Explains Small Number
Comparing the English and
American educational programs,
Calvert observed that the seem-
ingly small number of college-level
students is accounted for by the
English "sixth form"-the high-
est level of pre-university study.
The "sixth form" compares with
our freshman year of college.
His interest in politics has ex-
tended beyond the undergraduate
experience. He is interested in
working in the area of European

I

unity, believes the United Nations
should be strengthened although,
regretfully, "our government has
done more than many to make
it weaker."
While admittedly a liberal, Cal
vert things "the Labor Party in
England and the whole idea' be-
hind socialism are out of date,"
while, on the other hand, "con's
servatism is rubbish."

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BRITISHER VIEWS 'U'

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1

MAIL ORDERS:
Folk Arts Festival -Ann Arbor, Michigan !
Please include self-addressed envelope.

PETER CALVERT
...more activities at 'U'

Admission $1.00

.1

if
S.G.C. Ciftepia uil
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAYt
at 7 and 9:15<
CRIME and PUNISHMENT TEA and SYMPATHY
HARRY BAUR (Color)
PIERRE BLANCHAR DEBORAH KERR JOHN KERR
Short: HARLEM WEDNESDAY Short: CHARMIDES
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

the ristory department. His fel-
lowship was awarded through the
exchange program of the English
Speaking Union.
Finds More Women
He finds the biggest difference
between Cambridge and the Uni-I
versity in the number of women
at each school. "The number of
women at Cambridge is strictly
limited and so those attending are
alarmingly brilliant," he said.
"They also seem to want to hide
the fact that they are women, by
dressing like men."

PETER CALVERT
. .avid politician
"I believe freedom is the most
important thing about any demo-
cratic government," he said.
"Freedom is being imperiled not
only on tfle outside, but through
creeping bureaucracy--the ten-
dency of the government to cease
to act."
Calvert thinks Great Britain's
defense program costs too muchf
and is inadequate, placing too
much stress on nuclear bombs and
not enough on maintaining a con-
ventional force in Europe.

BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

Professors
To Lead Talk
On Theology
"Modern Theologians" will be
the topic of the Student Govern-
ment Council Reading and Discus-
sion program seminar to be held
at 4:15 p.m. today in the Honors
Lounge of the Undergraduate Li-
brary.
The group, to be led by Prof.
George Peek of the political sci-
ence department and Prof. Guy
Swanson of the sociology depart-
ment will consider movements in
contemporary theology, studying
Tillich and Niebuhr in particular.

By LINDA REISTMAN
The tragic drama is a unique
form which has had a living
existence in but a few times and
places, Prof. Gerald Else of the
department of classical studies,
said at the Student Government
Council's Reading and Discussion
Seminar on "Greek Tragedy"
Wednesday night.
"Tragedy was alive only in the
fifth century B.C. in Athens. It
was then imitated by the Romans
in the second century and later

PROF. ELSE SPEAKS:
Tragic Drama Unique Form:
Exists in Few Times, Places

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CARLOS MONTOYA

THE WORLD'S FOREMOST FLAMENCO GUITARIST-
FROM COAST TO COAST
ACCLAIMED B Y CRITICS...
"A sold-out Town Hall and an audience that overflowed onto the stage
greeted Carlos Montoya, at his recital last night. . . . At the close of
the concert there were cheers and shouts of 'Ole."'
-NEW YORK TIMES
"Montoya's technique on the guitar is quite more prodigious and flashy
than Segovia's. It includes operations in the left hand that strike sparks
of very technical silver."-
-SAN FRANCISCO CH RONICLE
"The music as well as the art of Carlos Montoya has to be seen and
heard at first hand. To put this total experience into words would still
fail to convey its flashing color, its grief, its possion, its technical
brilliance. I am afraid that even recordings fall way short."
-MONTEREY CALIFORNIA HERALD
"Carlos Montoya certainly is a genius in the field of flamenco music
.. he transformed a mixed audience of devotees and the curious into
o cheering, stamping house full of dedicated enthusiasts."
-SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS
"Carlos Montoya literally stopped the show with virtuoso guitar playing
that seemed to evoke the very soul of Spain!"
-CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE
"Carlos Montoya transformed the guitar into a No. 1 musical instru-
ment, producing the most phenomenal music this reviewer has ever
heard . . .
-NE W ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE

ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
Sept. 29 Sept. 30 Oct. 1
GIAN-CARLO MENOTTI'S
"THE MEDIUM"
starring
MURIEL GREENSPON as "BABA"
with KAREN KL IPEC
MARLOWE TEIG SUZANNE ROY
TOM CULTICE DIANE FRANJAC
and
"THE TELEPHONE
with

by the Elizabethans and 17th cen-
tury French," Prof. Else explain-
ed.
Greek tragedy developed during
the short span of 100 years, after
being presented originally as part
of the ritual of the feast of Diony-
sus, he said.
"However, Greek tragedy was
not religious drama as many be-
lieve. Much of it is impregnated
with religious ideas but this is
mainly because of the author's
preoccupation with the subjects.
"There is no such thing as
Greek tragedy as a standard proid-
uct," Prof. Else added. It is condi-
tioned by the times and the au-
thor's viewpoints. Each play must
be read for itself, he said.
Another pre-conceived notion
which Prof. Else clarified was that
of Greek tragedy as a tragedy of
fate. "This usually implies that
man's actions on earth are sim-
ply a rehearsal of a fate that has
already been charted," he said.
Actually, the Greeks were too
full of free will in their characters,
Prof. Else declared. The action, Is
determined by the fact that the
characters do what they feel they
must," he explained.
Prof. Else cited the "Illiad" of
Homer as the parent of all trag-
edy. The moral agony of Achel-
leus, the fall and doom of a great
man, is the essence of the tragic
spirit, he said. "The characters
and situations in the plays may
be shaped in a way that they may
build to this conclusion plausibly,
but the traditionalhclimax must
not be destroyed," he said.

JUDITH HAUMAN

JERRY LAWRENCE

Musical Direction and Staging by Edgar LaMance

Mail Orders Now
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Thursday $1.50
Friday-Saturday $1.75

BOX OFFICE OPENS
SEPTEMBER 26
10 A.M.-4 P.M.

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STARTS TODAY
NOTE TIME
SCHEDULE

DIAL
NO 5-6290

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SINNER! ELMER GANTRY WANTS YOU! TO SAVE YOUR
SOUL! TO SEE THE LIGHT! ARE YOU READY, SINNER?
HE WANTS YOU TO KNOW ALL ABOUT HEAVEN..
SUTNOT ABOUT HIS WHISKEY AND HIS WOMEN!

"Montoya ploys, crowd oles."

-DETROIT TIMES
-TULSA WORLD

"Guitarist Montoya captured audience."

FRIDAY. OCT.

7 -8:30 P. .

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