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September 30, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l, W "I firer , ; IF,

PAGE

Macmillan Proposes PI

RIGHTISTS SUFFER DEFE AT:
os overnment Orders Cease-Fire

For

Limited Arms

AT GENEVA CONFERENCE:'
Britain Outlines Test Ban Plan

,.

GENEVA (A) - Britain yester-
day presented the Big Three nu-
clear test ban conference a three-
phase plan for a global network of
control posts to police a test ban
treaty.
British delegate Sir Michael
Wright said it was a six-year
project that would create the basis
p for a working control system with-
in its first two years.
The plan would provide for
about 180 control posts, including
10 ships to ply the oceans and
sample water an air for radio-
activity.
The first phase would cover the
Northern Hemisphere, including
the United States, Britain, the
Soviet Union and the Pacific nu-
clear test islands. Eventually there
would be 20 control posts on the
Soviet mainland and one on the
Soviet island of Kamchatka..
Soviet 'delegate Semyon K.
Tsarapkin immediately protested
that 15 would be enough on Soviet
territory. He also urged that Aus-
tralia and Africa be included in
the first phase as nuclear test
areas.
The first phase - of four years
- would provide for the setting
up of 36 control posts, including
20 on islands and some on ships.
The second phase - of one
year - would complete the north-
ern Hemisphere network and startj
the installation of controls in theI
Southern Hemisphere.
The third and final phase would

complete the control system in the
Southern Hemisphere.
It was suggested that the first
phase be split up into two two-
year periods.
First 10 control posts would be
set up on Soviet territory, 12 in
the United States and on its is-
lands, and 14 in Britain and its
possessions.
The remaining two-year period
would be used to fill out remain-

ing control gaps in territories of
these original parties to the test
ban treaty.
Wright did not pinpoint the
location for any of the posts.
Tsarapkin said he found the
number envisaged for the Soviet
Union excessive because it has
large areas where no earthquakes
occur which could be confused
with nuclear explosions.

Dexter Cites Uncertainty
As State's Big Problem

William D. Dexter, assistant
state attorney general, said yes-
terday that Michigan's greatest
tax problem is not the lack of
current revenue, but uncertainty
over the future.
Speaking to attorneys attending
taxation section's meetings at the
Attempt Fails
To Use Power
Of Hydrogen
LONDON (A--Britain's second
big attempt to harness the pow-
er of the hydrogen bomb has been
abandoned because it cost too
much money and manpower.
The nation's Atomic Energy
Authority announced Monday that,
plans to build a revolutionary
research machine code-named
ICSE have been scrapped.

convention of the state bar asso-
ciation in Gran4 Rapids, Dexter
pointed out problems that an at-
torney might have in this area.
Tax uncertainty is extremely
disturbing to business. How can
an attorney now advise a busi-
ness that might want to come in-
to Michigan? The uncertainty is
more detrimental to us than any
of the tax plans that have been
proposed."
Dexter named two major prob-
lems in the state's taxation pro-
gram: The fact that Michigan
taxes on business are not com-
petitive with other states and can
not attract business into the
state, and that any added in-
come to the state or lowered busi-
ness taxes must be made up from
personal taxes.
"The pressure to reduce taxa-
tion in Michigan conflicts with
the very real need of government
for additional revenues," Dexter,
said.

Ban
RI1I
Requests UN
To Establish
New-Group
Expert Committee
Would Study Issues j
UNITED NATIONS (P)-British'
Prime Minister Harold A. Mac-
Millan proposed a limited ap-
proach to disarmament yesterday
- but indications were his pro-
posal, like all those before it,
would bog down in the old quarrel
over controls.
He told the United Nations
General Assembly it should set up
a group of experts to solve the
technical problems of stopping the
spread of armaments guarantee-
ing against surprise attack and
gradually cutting down all arms
- among them problems of con-
trol.
He denied that to do this would
mean the "control without dis-
armament" that the Soviet Union
has accused the West of seeking.
Khrushchev Shouts
But Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev, clearly still skeptical,
at one point shouted: "You accept
disarmamentand we will accept
any control."
Macmillan's proposal was sig-
nificant in that he made it only
hours before a conference with
Khrushchev.
It was the most elaborate
scheme any Western leader yet
had presented to the Assembly
with the object of getting dis-
armament negotiations resumed.
No Comment
Macmillan failed to express an
opinion on Khrushchev's pending'
resolution to add India, Indonesia,
Ghana, Mexico and the United
Arab Republic to the 10-nation
East-West disarmament committee
that the Russians walked out on
in Geneva last June 27.
He also withheld his view on
Khrushchev's revised version of
the year-old Soviet plan for
general -nd complete disarma-
ment, which the Russian leader
put before the Assembly last week.
Macmillan indicated his pro-
posal intended as a supplement
.rather than a competitor to others
- "a modest step" toward pro-
gress. He said the report of the
proposed experts' group would be
of great advantage to any dis-
armament negotiating body.
Recalls Geneva
He recalled that the current
American-British-Soviet talks in
Geneva for controlled cessation
of nuclear tests began with a re-
port from an experts' group setting
out a possible control system.
"We should," he said, "apply
this principle to the wider field
of disarmament. This is theybet
-perhaps the only - way to
make progress.'
He proposed that the group
work inthese areas:
"Preventing the extension of
armaments"-keeping outer space
from being used for military pur-
poses, halting the manufacture of
! atomic materials for such purposes
and detecting hidden stores of
such materials.
"Ensuring against a surprise at-
tack by one side or the other."
"Gradually reducing to a mini-
mum all forms of armaments."
Macmillan said the Assembly
should tell the experts that any
measures they might propose
"should not give at any stage a

significant advantage to either
side" and "should provide for ef-I
fective verification at all states."

HILLEL'S
Open to alI hungry persons!
Begins SUN., OCT. 2
6 P.M. . . . 1429 Hill St.
Tickets $1.00 Member 75c
Menu: Juice
Corned Beef or Pastrami Sandwich
Dill Pickles Potato Chips
Soft Drink Dessert

-AP Wirephoto
AIR SUPPORT -- Rightwing Laotian rebels dropped paratroopers
into the beleagured city of Sam Neua earlier this week. Yesterday,
the rebels' stronghold fell to Pathet Loa troops who represent
the leftiit faction in the three-cornered sruggle going on for
power in the Southeast Asian kingdom.

VIENTIANE W-) - Premier
Prince Souvanna Phouma said
yesterday orders have gone out
for a cease-fire throughout Laos.
The rightist rebel followers of
Gen. Phoumi Novosan had just
suffered a significant defeat in
the northas the general engaged
in peace talks at Luang Prabang,
the royal capital, with military
representatives ofr Souvanna's neu-
tralist government.
The stronghold of Sam Neua.
fell yesterday under a strong at-
tack by pro-Communist Pathet
Lao rebels, who may have been
aided by parachute troops loyal to
Souvanna.
Souvanna also said Gen. Phou-
mi had proposed in the Luang
Prabang peace talks that forma-
tion of a "Government of National
Unity" headed by three leaders
in Laos' three-cornered civil war.

As it was described to newsmen
such a regime would be headed
by Souvanna; his half-brother,
Prince Souvanna Vong, leader of
the Pathet Lao; and Prince Boun
Oum, political head of Phoumi's
rebel regime.
Asked if he would favor such
a_ government, Souvanna said "I
favor any solution which will
bring peace and order back to
Laos."
Souvanna appeared confident
the Pathet Lao would come to
terms with him. There was no
evidence, however, this hope was
based on solid grounds.
If Pathet Lao guerrillas are
dominant in Sam Neua, which
held them off for months, they
could be in a strong bargaining
position in future peace talks.

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and U
Michigan Daily Classifiedr
FOLK MUSIC FANS
Josh hie sings
Ann Arbor High Auditorium
October 29

featuring
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Mort Sahl

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Clair, France, 1927)
Nov. 21: STRIKE (dir. by Eisenstein, Russia, 1924) ;
and KINO PRAVDA (Soviet propaganda newsreel,
1922)
Dec. 12: THE LAST TEN DAYS OF HITLER idir. by
G. W. Pabst, Austria, 1955); INVASION (Nazi
propaganda newsreel, 1944) ; and BRIEF EXCERPT
fromevidence at Nuremberg Trials, 1946 (Films

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Mar. 20: THE TOLL GATE (William S. Hart, U.S.,
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April 17: 1 VITELLONI (dir. by Federico Fellini,
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May 8: EARTH (dir .by Dovzhenko, Russia-Ukra-
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