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September 27, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 11HIAN DAILY TUESDAY, SE

PTEMBER

DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE?
All Facilities Ready for Sick

I

By THOMAS KASER
Should any University student
become ill and need emergency
medical treatment, nearly $32
million worth of hospital equip-
ment, buildings and personnel is
available to him.
Most students encounter only
minor ills and health problems
while attending the University,
but Dr. Morley B. Beckett, director
of Health Service, says that any
students needing major emergency
medical treatment will be referred
to University Hospital and given
financial aid by Health Service.
What is "emergency service?"
Can a student receive financial
assistance from Health Service if
he needs surgery to correct a pre-
existing health disorder?
Decide Emergencies
"We decide if something is an
emergency or not according to
good medical practice," Dr. Beck-
ett says. "It doesn't always have
to be a middle-of-the-night case,
either.
We don't care if an ailment is
new or pre-existing-if something
needs immediate care, we consider
it an emergency."
Until this year, Health Service
has given financial assistance to
only those students carrying more
than a certain minimum academic
load. I
This year Health Service will
serve any University student living
in the Ann Arbor area. In fact,
in genuine need, Health Service
will provide ambulance and home
call service (the latter subject to
slight charge) to any student un-
able to make his way to Health
Service.
Little Need
Dr. Beckett emphasizes that it is
only rarely that a student needs
the more extensive facilities of
University Hospital.
Health Service has nine full-
time physicians in the general
clinic, plus nearly 30 part-time
medical specialists available at
varying times during the week.
DIAL-NO8-416
* ENDING THURSDAY
Music sets
the mood for
love that is
summers nighti
77 w, oa - c eo - ' avwL'm
"Om anMTCI.E#MAJC~gN it IltI"
O~M4WAHIGTN GO C ILOR HC Aa
J'T A ATACR? hL~,SVN

Spiika To Lead
SGC Seminar
"The Works of D. H. Lawrence"
will be the subject of the sec-
and Student Government Council
reading and discussion seminar
to'be held today at 4:15 p.m. in
the Honors Lounge of the Under-
graduate Library.
The group will discuss the top-
ic under the guidance of Prof.
Mark Spilka of the English de-
partment. They will consider the
book "Women in Love" and other
supplementary readings.
All interested students are in-
vited to attend, evei if they are
not enrolled in the discussion pro-
gram.
C1o
MojiOya

A

IT HURTS, MA-A familiar scene is repeated at the University's
Health Service as not-so-healthy coed receives a "painless" in-
jection from experienced nurse.

J.

Its responsibilities include not only
health care of students, but also
complete periodic faculty, food
handler, and radiation control
examinations, plus general en-
vironmental health and safety.
In addition to specialists, there
are special clinics available in
-allergy, otology (ear), ophthal-
mology (eye), dermatology (skin),
orthopedic surgery and dentistry.
"But, just like eligibility to be
treated at University Hospital, the
Health Service Dental Clinic is
available for emergency care
only," Dr. Beckett added. "Fillings
and regular dental care can be
obtained /either at the dentistry
school or a local dentist."
Mental Health
Perhaps one of the most over-
looked agencies in Health Service
is the Mental Hygiene Clinic, lo-
cated on the second floor. Staffed
by three physicians who are spe-
cialists in psychiatry and six psy-
chiatric social workers, the service
To Compare
France, USA
"Mass Culture: A Sociological
Comparison of France and Amer-
ica" will be the subject of an
address by Prof. Joffre Dumaze-
dier of the Centre d'Etudes So-
ciologiques in Paris, at 4 p.m., to-
day in Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Prof. Robert C. Angell of the
sociology department will give a
summary of the speech in Eng-
lish and comment upon it.
Haddock To Speak
On Radio Science
"Radio Astronomy at the Uni-
versity," is the title of an ad-
dress which will be delivered to-
night by Prof. Fred T. Haddock
of the astronomy department.
The lecture, which will be given
at 7:30 in Rm. 2084, East Engi-
neering, will be a general discus-
sion of the radio astronomy pro-
gram at the 'University.
Bretton To Speak
On 'New Africa'
Prof. Henry Bretton of the
political science department will
lecture to the honors students on
"The Problems of the New Afri-
can Nations" at 8 p.m. today in
the Rackham Amphitheater.

I

DIAL NO 5-6290
IT'S DAFFY
FT'S A DILLY
The Daffodil Sprng
Comedy Screo 4
"PURE
LUNACY!1
RIDICULOUSLY
FUNNY!i
--N.Y. Daily News
COMING FRIDAY
"ELMER
GANTRY"

Fri.,.O ct. 7
8:36 P.M.
Ann Arbor High
Tickets $3.50 - $2.75
$2.25 - $1.75 (tax incl.)

is mostly advisory in nature, pri-
marily concerned with students'
methods of study and academic
loads.
Diagnostic and some therapeutic
service is also available to stu-
dents with emotional and neuro-
logical conditions.

i
V

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Mail Orders to Masonic Auditorium. 500 Temple. Enc. 'Self-Addressed,
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MORI .SAHL

T - -I

Rushing provides an essential experience in the college life of every Michigan man.
During the first year in Ann Arbor, each freshman has the opportunity to examine
the type of living, available in the University Residence Halls; but only by rushing can the
freshman acquaint himself with organized college life at the fraternity level.
Registering for rush creates no obligation on the part of the rushee to pledge but
merely provides him with an opportunity to view the system under which nearly 3,000
Michigan undergraduate men are living.
Even'for the man who wishes to join a fraternity at a future date or for the rushee
who does not receive a bid to the fraternity of his choice, rushing provides an invaluable

-

1

experience for any future contact with the fraternity system.
Fraternity affiliation is more than' just a housing arrangement; it involves lifelong
obligations and privileges. The Interfraternity Council does not ask every man to pledge;
we only urge that you make your own decision after you personally have judged Michigan

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