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September 27, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-27

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F 27 196

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Castro Urges Lati Revolutions;
Calls Nixon, Kennedy Ignorant'

lw -

TO REBUFF DICTATOR:
Ike Asks Nations
To Share Freedom

Hints Move
Against U.S.
Naval Base

4''

y

NEW YORK W) - President
Eisenhower urged free nations
yesterday to share their freedom
in order to rebuff the dangers
posed by "a powerful, secretive
dictatorship."
Without mentioning Russia by
name, the President called on all
Americans to shun materialism
and uphold the dignity of their
fellow men everywhere.
Eisenhower spoke out in a
speech prepared for delivery at
Sky Watcher Sees
Mystery Satellite
SAN DIEGO tm"} - A moon
watcher said yesterday that he
was convinced a huge mystery
satellite has been in orbit around
the Earth but that he doubted it
was carrying Russian astronauts.
Tom Hemphill, Corvair engi-
neer and head of a volunteers
moon-watch team, said a picture
of the satellite nad been taken
by a similar team in Pennsylvan-
ia.
Reports of sighting have come
to him from other sources in the
last ten days, he said.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration has denied
that any sightings have been
made by its tracking stations.

the golden Jubilee dinner of, The
NationalConference of Catholic
Charities.
Crisis Meetings
Eisenhower delivered his address
after holding two confidential
meetings on the East-West United
Nations crisis-with India's Prime
Minister Nehru and President
Gamal Abdel Nasser of the United
Arab Republic.
"Knowing that peace and free-
dom are weakened if not shared,
we help other nations which, like
ourselves, uphold the dignity of
men and maintain their liberty,"
he said.
"America, if true to herself, will
never be tempted to abandon her
noble goals. A materialistic Amer-
ica -- bereft of spiritual purpose
- could be nothing more than a
rudderless ship of state.
Observes Dangers
Looking at the world's problems,
the President said that at present
the dangers seem "most violent
in surface turmoil, most intense
in inner passion and most titanic
in destructive potential."
Eisenhower avoided any direct
mention of Soviet Premier Nikita
Khrushchev's demand that the
UN be drastically revamped in line
with a Soviet blueprint and that
the post of Secretary-General be
abolished.

Mass Rushing Meeting
Union Ballroom
September 28
7:30 P.M.

Khrushchev Leads.
Soviet, Cuban Cheers
UNITED NATIONS MP)-Cuba's
Prime Minister Fidel Castro ap-
plauded by Soviet delegates, made
his UN debut last night with a
call for revolution ' throughout
Latin America and an attack on
both United States presidential.
candidates as ignorant and poli-
tically brainless. He also threat-.
ened to try pushing the United
States-by legal means-out of
its Guantanamo Bay Naval Base.
Castro's bitter attack on the
United States came at a moment'
when President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower,' playing a leading role in
a Western counter - offensive
against Soviet demands to shake
up the UN's structure. was ap-
pealing for "calm voices" in the
rising diplomatic crisis.
The bearded revolutionary's ad-!
dress at one point brought a re-
buke from Assembly President
Frederick H. Boland of Ireland
for Castro's comments on the
United States election compaign.
But Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev at several points led
bursts of applause from the Com-
munist bloc and Cuban delegates
for Castro's remarks.
Supports Communists
Castro's speech, which also of-
fered support to the Russians in
their attacks on UN Secretary
General Dag Hammarskold, cap-
ped a day which brought these
developments insideandhoutside
the UN General Assembly's his-r
toric 15th session:
1. The West mounted a vigor-t
ous counter - offensive againstr
Khrushchev,accusing him ofgiv-
ing lip service to the UN whilec
deliberately trying to destroy it.
2. Secretary General Hammarsk-
jold, main target of Khrushchev'st
attacks, made an unexpected ap-
pearance on the Assembly stages
and characterized the Soviet cam-r
paign against his office as an as-t
sault on the whole institution. TheE
Communist bloc delegates thump- t
ed their desks with their fists,'
laughing uproariously, w h e nc
Hammarskjold finished, in what:
Khrushchev later called a gesture
of "protest." Khrushchev, smart-
ing from a diplomatic defeat in:-
the Congo, wants Hammarskold's
job abolished and a three-man
executive-with veto powers for:
each-in its place.
Khrushchev has said there can
be no disarmament agreement-
and that the cold war will deep-
en-unless his ideas about rip-
ping up the secretariat structure
of the UN are considered.
Long Speech
Castro took the UN stage in
the afternoon, promised to try
to be "brief," and went on for
hours with a long diatribe against
the United States. At one point,
the Cuban leader told the dele-
gates he "would welcome a revo-
lution (in other Latin American
countries) which would force the
American monopolists to give up
their ill-gotten gains."
Castro then launched into an
attack on the United States for
its retention of its naval base at
Guantanamo Bay, at the eastern
tip of Cuba. The United States
maintains the 70-million-dollar
installations there under treaty
and lease arrangements made
with previous Cuban governments.

Lao Fort
flit Anew
By Rebels
VIENTIANE, Laos ) - Pro-
Communist Pathet Lao guerrillas
last night stepped up their drive
againstthe government strong-
hold of Sam Neua in northern
Laos and massed additional forces
in adjoining Phong Saly province.
Lt. Col. Kong Vong Narath
Sam Neua army commander, told
reporters who paid a flying visit
to his post that the situation is
critical.
He said one Pathet Lao unit
captured a hilltop overlooking
Sam Neua's airstrip today while
scattered guerrilla forces moved
within two miles of the city.
Kong said, however, he believes
the main Pathet Lao force still
is about 10 miles from the city.
The army chief reported he has
only one week of supplies left.
He turned down offers of rein-
forcements and ammunition from
the neutralist government of Pre-
mier Souvanna Phouma in Vien-
tiane.
Kong apparently has received
no additional supplies recently
from Gen. Phoumi Nosavan, lead-
er of pro-western rebel forces
seeking to overthrow Souvanna.
The Pathet Lao, taking advan-
tage of civil war between Souvan-
na and Phoumi, are reported to
have deployed 500 troops in Phong
Saly province for a possible new
attack. Western sources said they
may have come from across the
border in Communist North Viet-
nam.
Western diplomats fear the
main danger to Laos now is that
the Pathet Lao will capitalize on
the Souvanna-Phoumi split to
launch a bold sweep southward.

LEOPOLD VILLE (JP-Sixty 04
Patrice Lumumba's supporters
kidnaped two of Col. Joseph Mo-
butu's government commissioners
yesterday, reputedly in full view
of a UN Ghana troop detachment,
then drove them out of town and
beat them severely.
Infuriated, Mobutu again de-
manded-this time at .a tense,
three-hour meeting of the UN
high command-that the Ghana
brigade be withdrawn immedi-
ately from the Congo.
The 29 year old strongman also
called for withdrawal of Guinea
troops, charging both Guinea and
Ghana favor Communist-backed
Lumumba in the 'Congo's power
struggle.
Mobutu first voiced these de-
mands last week, charging that
the two African nations were
meddling in the Congo's internal
affairs. Together their troops con-
stitute almost 20 per cent of the
16,400-man UN force. The Brit-
ish-officered Ghana brigade to-
tals 2,291 men; the Guinea bat-
talion 749.
It appeared unlikely the UN
staff, headed by Ambassador Ra-

jeshwar Dayal of India, wou
agree to Mobutu's demand. U
officials have consistently mat
taied no Congolese authority ca
restrict the makeup of the corr
mand.
(Dayal warned in a report,
Secretary-General Dag Har
marskjold, made public in Ne
Y1ork a week ago, that wor
peace may be endangered unle
dissident Congolese factions patc
up their differences. Despite t
internal difficulties, Dayal sa:
there is no doubt the UN pre
ence has had a steadying effec
Circulation' at the UN of this re
port, which strongly defended t
way the UN and Hammarskjo
have been operating in theC ons
amounted to a rebuttal of attac
on the Secretary-General by tl
Soviet bloc.)
Both Mobutu and Maj. 0e
Carl Von Horn of Sweden, tt
UN commander in chief, look
grim at the windup of the hea
quarters conference.
Von Horn marched off witho
a word to newsmen. Mobutu, rx
splendent in a gold-braided trop
cal uniform, followed him out.

UN DEBUT-Fidel Castro took advantage of his first appearance
at the United Nations yesterday to blast American policy in a
four hour talkathon.

WORLD BANK MEETING:

Europe Told To Assist
US. in)ForeignAid Plans
WASHINGTON (41) -- Finance - .

PAPER-BOUND
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OFFICIALS SEIZED:
Mobutu Demands
Ghana Withdrawal

I

ministers of the free wor and can aford to take on a su-

told yesterday that prosperous Eu-
rope must lend the United States
a hand in helping the under-
developed areas.
Throughout the postwar years,}
the United States has been the+
big aid-giver. However, a proces-
sion of speakers at the annual'
meeting of the World Bank and
the International Monetary Fund
said other economically strong na-
tions now have an obligation to
assume a larger share of the bur-
den.
The theory is that, with United
States help, they have completed
their postwar economic recovery

stantial part of the aid chore.
One step in this direction came
with the formal establishment to-
day of the International Develop-
ment Association, a World Bank
affiliate which will provide easy-
term loans to emerging nations.
IDA, as the new institution is
known, already has collected from
member countries more than 60
per cent of its planned capital of
$1 billion-the requirement for
putting it in business.
Fifteen nations have kicked in
$686 million to IDA. The biggest
contributors have been the United
States, the United Kingdom, West
Germany and India.

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