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September 23, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE ITICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY' SEPTEMBER

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER

SAB Construction Advances

CAMBRIDGE HALL:
A partrnents Converted
In Housing Experiment

Cambridge Hall is the scene of
an experimental type of housing,
for women at the University.
This most recent addition to
the University dormitory system
is a conversion of one of the Uni-1
versitynTerrace apartments. The
two and three room suites house;
74 junior and senior women, who
were chosen for the project last
spring on the basis of interestj
and financial need.
Two types of living quarters are
available at Cambridge: Suites
containing a living room, kitchen-
ette. and bedroom; and 'efficien-
cies" having a combination living
room-bedroom area and a kitch-
enette. Four girls occupy the larg-
er apartments and three are as-
signed to the smaller ones.
The Cambridge Hall residents
arrived at the University this fall
and found that the units had
been completely painted inside
and out, with modern furniture,
tiled walls, and over $100 worth
of pots, pans and dishes in each.
Barbara Cagen, '61, president of
Cambridge Hall, said the women
in the project feel that they have
an obligation to the University
for the gracious facilities they
have been given.
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING SATURDAY
Feature daily of 6:45-9:05
The
entertainment
world's most
Wonderful4
entertainmentl - L

"We must maintain an honor
system," she says. There is no
central lobby; three separate en-
trances admit the women, who,
under University dormitory Juris-
diction, are obliged to comply
with all-campus rules including
regular women's hours and late
permissions. The outside doors
remain locked at all times for
the protection of the residents.
"The future of Cambridge Hall
depends on how well the women
succeed this year," says Barbara,
"and we're all going to work to
see that it does."

IN P

-David Ghltrow
GOING UP OR COMING DOWN?-Looking somewhat like archaeological ruins or the remains
of a demolished building, the growing addition to the Student Activities Building has taken over
the once green and grassy plot of ground surrounded by University buildings and parking lots. The
addition will provide space for overflowing University offices and student organizations.

State Adopts
Bypass Plan

AT LAST MEETING:
-SGC Approves Appointment;
Accepts Club as New Board

-differences and similarities in The State Highway Department
their appilaches to and opinions has given final approval to con-
about the book. struction of a bypass at the
A letter has been sent out to northern and western edge of
those enrolled in the program giv- Ann Arbor according to the orig-
ing further details, inal plans,
Meeting with local representa-
tives in Lansing, the department
H cTdmadeclear that a previously con-
sidered plan to construct the new
Semninar on Jazz highway farther north in the
area of Schoolcraft and North
The first seminar of the Stu- Territorial roads was no longer
dent Government Reading and being considered.
Discussion Program will be held University representatives had'
today at 4:15 p.m, in the Honors favored this latter route which
League of the Undergraduate Li- would have removed much traf-
brary and will deal with the topic, fic from the campus area.
"American Jazz." The adopted route will con-
Professor H. W. Hitchcock of nect US-23 north of the city with'
the music school will lead the Interstate 94 (US-12) now under
seminar. Intrtion w(s-1o) nnw Arbder
In addition to discussing the construction west of Ann Arbor.
primary reading book on the sub- The cost of the project will be
ject, "The Story of American $3,886,802, to be split between
Jazz," by Marshall .Sterns, re- the state and federal government.
cordings will be played. Construction of the Northbelt
All interested students are in- will begin no earlier than July
vited to attend, even if they are 1962, at the start of a new five
not enrolled in the program. year building program.

The Student Government Coun-'
cil approved the appointment of
Per Hanson, '61, to the University
Lecture Committee, and accept-
ed the Wolverine Club as a semi-
autonomous related board to the
Council during its meeting last
Wednesday night.
In presenting the case for the
Club, Wolverine executive vice-
president Irwin Dinn explained
that the club is a campus serv-
ice organization, with an eleven
member executive board who are
active the entire year and who
Trio AMits Theft
Of VFW Dishes
Brad Myers, '61, ex-varsity
football halfback, Gerald Kolb,
'62, hockey player under an ath-
letic scholarship, and Richard A.
Buck, '61, all pleaded guilty to
larceny Wednesday when arraign-
ed before Municipal Judge Francis
L. O'Brien.
The three posted bonds of $25
apiece and were released pending
their sentencing Oct. 6.
City police arrested Myers,
Kolb and Buck early Wednesday
morning carrying dishes stolen
from the V.F.W. Hall at 314 E.
Liberty St. Myers told arresting
officers the dishes were for an
apartment the three were fur-
nishing.
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

would be the official members of
the club.
During the ensuing discussion
it was pointed out that recogni-
tion would give protection to the
club and aid in providing a serv-
ice to the student body.
The Council also approved the
distribution of 1959 homecoming
profits with $100 to Challenge,
and the balance to be applied to
the J-Hop deficit.
An appropriation of $200 was
also approved to pay an office
manager and typist for SGC dur-
ing this semester.
Activities which were calendar-
ed included the Folklore Society
Concert on October 14 and the
Inter-Fraternity - Panhellenic
Jazz Concert to be held February
11.
The International Students
Dance to be held Sept. 30 and a
play entitled "Which Way the
Wind?" to be sponsored by var-
ious campus and city groups were
also approved by the council. In
addition to approving the play
for October 11, SGC will send out
letters relating to the program to
student organizations.
Other activities brought to the
Council's attention for viewing
at a future date were the Ann
Arbor Liquor-by-the-Glass-Pro-
posal and the Addition to the Stu-
dent Activities Building.
Regents To Hold
Monthly Meeting
The Regents will hold their
monthly meeting this afternoon,
Included in the agenda is dis-
cussion of the vacancy created
by the resignation of Prof. Robert
White as director of the Institute
of Science and Technology.
William K. Pierpont, University
vice-president in charge of busi-
ness and finance and an ex-of-
ficio member of the Regents, will
report on actions taken by the
University since state Attorney
General Paul Adams' statement of
opinion on the legality of pay-
roll deductions for union dues at
the University.

pi

BERMAN
with the
CUMBERLAND THREE
WED., OCT. 12
8:30 P.M.
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Tickets $4.50-3.50-
2.75-2.25-1.75
(tax incl.)
On Sale At
THE DISC SHOP &
THE MUSIC CENTER

I , 6;j; 4ij

I I

41

JONND RNF2-E64
DILNO 2-6264

ENDS TODAY *
r ~k 11M1"dL .ers

)i Clo 9
' Ionto
e'1bh

STARTING SATURDAY

NN ARBOR HIG14 @ FRI., OCT. 7-8:30 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED
$3.50 -2.75 -2.25 - 1.75 (tax incl.)
Tickets on sale at the DISC SHOP, 1210S. Univ.2

I

ANN ARBOR PREMIER

Sept. 30

Oct. 1

GIAN-CARLO MENOTTI'S
"THE MEDIUM"*

joMic lt 'cietq

starring
MURIEL GREENSPON as "BABA"

announces

200 Subscriptions Open for the 1960-61 Series

with
KAREN KLIPEC
/E TEIG SUZANNE ROY
ILTICE DIANE FRANJAC

and

Oct. 10: THE NAKED NIGHT (SAWDUST
AND TINSEL) (dir. by Ingmar Bergman,
Sweden, 1953); and PALLE ALONE IN
THE WORLD (dir. by Henning-Jensen,
Denmark, 1951)
Oct. 24: THE ITALIAN STRAW HAT (dir.
by Rene Clair, France, 1927)
Nov. 21: STRIKE (dir, by Eisenstein, Rus-
sia, 1925); and KINO PRAVDA (Soviet
propaganda'newsreel, 1922)
Dec. 12: LAST TEN DAYS OF HITLER (dir.
by G. W. Pabst, Germany, 1955); and
INVASION (Nazi propaganda newsreel,
1944)

Mar. 20: THE TOLL GATE (William S. Hart,
U.S., 1920); and HIS BITTER PILL (prod.
by Mack Sennett, U.S., 1916-with Mack
Swain)
April 17: VITELLONI (dir. by Federico Fel-
lini, Italy, 1954) ; and BAMBINI IN CIT-
TA (Italian documentary, 1946)
May 8: EARTH (dir. by Dovzhenko, Russia-
Ukronia, 1928); and THE ROUNDERS
(Keystone comedy, U.S., 1914, with Char-
lie Chaplin and Fatty Arbuckle)
May 29: THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE
(dir. by John Huston, U.S., 1951); and
THE FIRST FILM PROGRAMS (Paris-Lon-
don-New York, 1895-6)

with
JUDITH HAUMAN JERRY LAWRENCE

Jan. 16: MAEDCHEN IN NUIFORM (dir.
by Leontine Sagan ,Germany, 1932);
,rad NICE TIME tI rtksh ,4tumentrv.

I

IT.

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