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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OIL IN SIGHT-Work is being done on the installation of aluminum railings in the front of
Angell Hall and the Alumni Memorial Hall, the University Plant Operations Department an-
nounced yesterday. The railings should be in by the end of the week and will be the same as those
at the back of the Administration Building.

'U, Plannersl
To Convene
Tomorrow
The University Development
Council will hold its seventh an-
nual conference tomorrow and
Saturday.
The purpose of the conference
is to appraise the programs in-
itiated by the Council in the past
year and to outline development
plans and projects for the future.
Alan W. MacCarthy, director of
the Council, said.
Tomorrow's program includes a
luncheon speech . by Allan F.
Smith, newly appointed dean of
the Law School; a meeting of
Alumni Fund local chairmen and
directors and a joint meeting of
the board of directors of the
Development Council and the
Alumni Fund.
University President Harlan
Hatcher and Vice-President for
University Relations Lyle M. Nel-
son will speak at dinner. A Satur-
day morning panel of University
administrative officers will discuss
"Michigan in the Sixties."
The panel will include Robert
Ford, associate dean of the gra-
duate school John McKevitt, as-
sistant to the vice-president in
charge of business and finance;
and University Admissions Direc-
tor Clyde Vroman. Administrative
Dean Robert Williams will mode-
rate the panel.
The Student Relations Board,
the student adjunct of the Devel-
opment Council, will give a report
on its activities, The SRB is in
existence to keep students in-
formed on the work of the De-
velopment Council and inform
students of their responsibility as
future Alumni of the University.

Musket Seeks
New Tryouts
MUSKET will hold its mass
meeting at 7:30 p.m., Sunday in
the Union Ballroom.
The short meeting will be fol-
lowed by sign-ups for all com-
mittees, according to John Fried,
general chairman. Committee
work is open in either production
or administration areas. MUSKET
is the only all-campus coed show
for both graduates and under-
graduates, he said.
Tryouts for the leading roles,
singing chorus, dancing, and
orchestra will begin Sunday night
and last until Thursday night of
this week.
On the subject of casting, "I
want to emphasize that tryouts
are open to freshmen through
graduate students. We have made
no commitments. We are depend-
ing entirely on the tryouts for the
cast," Fried said.
This year's production, Kismet,
an Oriental Fantasy which first
appeared, on Broadway in 1954,
will take place on Nov. 30 and
Dec. 1, 2, and 3.
Fried also announced the ap-
pointment of Esther Levine '61Ed,
to replace Josephine Kasle '62, as!
assistant general chairman and
Gaye LaGuire, Grad, as make-up
chairman.
SGC To Auction
Bicycles Saturday
The annual bicycle auction,,
sponsored by the Student Govern-
ment Council, will be held from
9-12 Saturday, at the Student
Activities Building.
About 50 bicycles will be auc-
tioned by Robert Rossman and
Norman Moscow.

Sailors Club
To Organize
Fall Season
The University Sailing Club
holds its open meeting at 7:30
tonight in the Union Ballroom.
Sailors and would-be sailors are
invited to meet old members and
see sailing slides and movies. Re-
freshments and the slide sequence
of Selma Sawaya "hiking out"
are to be featured.
With a fleet of nine boats on
Base-line Lake and three ice
boats, 'U' sailors are in action
every weekend the year around.
This weekend, the club offers
an open weekend to those inter-
ested in sailing at the club before
joining. Lessons will also be
available. Anyone in the Ann Ar-
bor area is eligible to join.
In addition to lessons the Sail-
ing Club offers Sunday morning
racing and a chance to race inter-
collegiately with the University
team. Free rides to and from the
lakes are provided by members.
State Requires
'Job Creation'
"The central economic problem
Michigan faces is making job
creation more attractive," Prof.
Paul W. McCracken of the School
of Business Administration said
in a speech before the State
Chamber of Commerce meeting.
To provide full employment for
its population, Michigan must
grow at twice the national average
according to Prof. McCracken.
"Our objective should be the
ambitious one of making -Michi-
gan's 'climate' particularly favor-
able for the expansion of industry
and job opportunities -and the
making of the 'new Michigan'
known," he emphasized.
"This is no be-kind-to-business
movement," he noted. "Those who
would otherwise be unemployed
have the greatest stake in making
Michigan a more attractive place
to do business."
CARLOS
MONTOYA
Coming
Friday, October 7th

Educational
A dvantages
Aid Family
(Continued from Page 1)
affection to each child. The easiest
way a mother can give more at-
tention to each child is to have
fewer of them.
"By and large, most Americans
would say that they want fewer
children because they love them so
much, not because they dislike
them."
Data for this study, the first
obtained from a cross-section of
wives in a communiyt, was gath-
ered by graduate students in the
sociology department's Detroit
Area course.
New Marriage
Analysis by Prof. Blood and
Wolfe turns up facts about new
marriages, too. Apparently two
people marry because they love
each other already, not because
they expect their love to blossom
after the ceremony.
"New brides tend to be especi-
ally satisfied with the companion-
ship of their husbands."But after
the first few "honeymoon years"
their enthusiasm tends to wane.
They stop waxing the car and
drying the dishes together, having
discovered (usually) that the hus-
band does best with the car and
the wife best with the dishes.
Sharing drops and specialization
increases.
When children arrive they bring
greater love for the family, and
not much less time for husband-
wife companionship. The wife
does tend to become more depen-
dent--"the husband's a man of
the world but she's confined,"
Prof. Blood explains.
Increased Domination
The longer a couple is married,
the more one person comes to
dominate the other. Highly edu-
cated men usually hold most fam-
ily power because their back-
grounds help for success.
"Today, the more successful the
husband is in the eyes of the
community, the more dominant
his part in marital decision-
making."
That sociological spectre "mom-
ism"-a theory which holds that
American women are increasingly
wrapping their husbands in ap-
ronstrings-doesn't stand up in
light of this new data, though.
Test Ideas'
Evans Says
(Continued from Page 1)
of their society, what are they-
what is their unifying principle?
What takes the place of reli-
gion? How does a tribal society
transform itself into a nation
without too extreme nationalism,
produce a democratic society,
rather than a Communist feeding
ground, and at the same time get
economic and social development?
These and other questions have
been studied by UNESCO in the
past, but more research and ef-
fective action is needed, he said.
The whole of knowledge, which
must confront these problems,
is greater than ever before, he em-
phasized. Knowledge is growing
fast but becoming disorganized.
He expressed concern for the
great power combined with a lack
o funderstanding which accom-
panies the impact of our country
in the world today.

"Schools are becoming a lot
better," Evans said, "but not fast
enough to overtake our growing
responsibility, because our sys-
tem of learning and solving prob-
lems is disorganized and waste-
ful. But we want it that way, be-
cause we believe the creative mind
should not have ,limitaitons, and
that it should{ be allowed to
choose to waste itself."
However, he went on, this sys-
tem makes it especially neces-
sary to develop the .total poten-
tial manpower through educa-
tion.
Evans questioned whether the
current methods of training grad-
uate students to be teachers and
researchers do not place too much
emphasis on the assimilation of
content, rather than on the ac-
tual process of teaching or train-
ing in the various methodological
approaches to finding answers to
posed problems.

Soph Show Central Committee
sang a mournful dirge during the
noon hour yesterday on the Diag.
The funeral march procession'
of 18 sophomores was a publicity
stunt to advertise the organiza-i
tion's mass meeting at 7:30 p.m.,
Sept. 28, at the League,.
This stunt song was a sample
of some of the plans that began
to take shape Tuesday evening in'
the basement of the League where
Soph Show 1960 held its first
Central Committee meeting of the
new semester.
The Central Committee is the
core of Soph Show, but the en-
tire sophomore class is encourag-
ed to join in the production, Cody
Engle, '63, general co-chairman,
said.
"Soph Show has room for people
in every capacity. We are looking
for enthusiastic, not necessarily
talented, sophomores to join in
the production of our show." Any,
sophomore is eligible to attend
To Resume
Song Group
The Folklore Society will hold
its first meeting tonight in the
third floor conference room of
the Union. The meeting is open
to the campus and is designed to
sign up members for the coming
semester. There will be no admis-
sion charged for the folksing.
The society holds meetings on
the average of, every two weeks
either on the Diag or in the Union.
Dues for the 200 or more mem-
bers are $2 a year.
In addition to sings, the society
sponsors concerts and guitar
workshops in the Student Activi-
ties Building for beginning, inter-
mediate and advanced students.
Last year, the group published
a magazine, "Folkways", devoted
to a discussion of the folk arts.

the mass meeting and sign up for
a committee.
The 1960 Soph Show Central
Committee was chosen last spring
by the previous Central Commit-
tee. This year's committee chair-
men are: Marsha Kanter and
Cody Engle, general chairmen;
Judy DeCaprio and Eddy Stein,
co-directors; Susan Hirsch and
Michael Endres, music co-direc-
tors; Barbara Rady and Carol
Kaufman, dance co-directors.
Other committee chairmen are
Mary Schmidt and Bob Walters,
co-secretaries; Linda Newman and
Mark Moskowitz, co-treasurers;
Diane Jacobson and Sam Zell,
publicity co-chairmen; Pat On-
drus, posters chairman; Pat Reit-
er, stunts chairman.
Also included are Claudia Ratt-
ner and Bob Fink, programs co-
chairman; Gay Fuger - Shaw,
and Robert Luri, productions
co-chairmen; Ronna Bergman,
props chairman; Fredda Weiss,
stage manager; Louise Hindley
and Marilyn Grossman, costumes
co-chairmen; and Joanne Steiner,
makeup chairman.
The Broadway musical, "Bells
Are Ringing," was chosen for the
1960 Soph Show. The production
will be given at 8 p.m., Nov. 17, 18,
and 19 in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater,
DIAL NO 2-6264
' ENDS FRIDAY *

Committee Seeks Talent
For Annual Soph Show

ENDS TONIGHT
DIAL NO 5-6290

TR OAN-OU'EM STSCO
WENDY ILER-MAIY UII
I SATURDAY
Daily Classified

"LOTS OF
FUN!*"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune

You orbit
into the
future

n METRO/ OR

Aid Entertain-
-i-y N.Y.
Daily News

st""Sn.
ROSANO DRBU M111MCAYNO
JON KERR "FRMNCENIKME

Bring Results

'So
met

ROD TAYLOR - ALAN YOUNG

I

i'i
i

PR6ICR6
First Contemporary Opera in Ann Arbor
Gian-Carlo Menotti's
"THE MEDIUM"
and his comic companion opera
"The Telephone"
starring
MURIEL GREENSPON as "Baba"
with
MARLOWE TOM KAREN
TEIG CULTICE KLIPEC
SUZANNE ROY DIANNE FRANJAC

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BANDS
Presents the
Dave Brubeck Qartet
featuring
PAUL DESMOND
September 23 . .
HILLAUDITORIUM
All Seats Reserved
8:30 P.M.
Hill Auditorium Box
Office Open9-5

SEE! HEAR!
FALL'S FIRST
JAZZ CONCERT

_____._,w._ ___ _ _..__ .

a

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1
4

F RESHMEN

JUDITH HAUMAN

JERRY LAWRENCE

Musical Direction and Staging by Edgar LaMance

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Student Government Council

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