100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'THE MICHIGAN DALY

SPLIT-LEVEL STRUCTURE:

Betas Occupy New House on Old Site

Guitarist Montoya to Coin
Play Flarnenco Selections

Beta Theta Pi moved into their
brand new split level house this
fall.

V

A1

The new house is located on
the same site as the old house,,
on the corner of State and Madi-
son. The old house was torn down
a year ago to make way for the
$225 thousand dollar structure.
The house is divided into two,
wings. The single level north wing+
contains a lounge, library and a
suite for the house mother, Mrs.
Benjamin. The lower level of the
south wing houses the recreation
room and dining facilities.
The upper two floors of the
wing are the living quarters. The
Betas have a two man suite sys-
tem and forty of the brothers live
in the house.
The new house was built be-
cause it was unfeasible for the
fraternity to maintain the old
building which was built in 1903.
During the year of building the
new house, the Betas lived in
what has now become the Tau
Epsilon Phi house.
Union Announces
Council Vacancies
Petitioning opens today for the
two vacancies on the Union execu-
tive council. The vacant positions
are the chairmanship of the In-
ternational and Special Events
Committees.

-David Glitrow
BETA THETA PI-The University's oldest fraternity dating back to 1845, moved into the newest
house on campus. The new house stands on the site of the old Beta house which was built in 1903.

Carlos Montoya, acclaimed as
the world's foremost flamenco
guitarist, will play here at 8:30
P.M. October 7 in the Ann Arbor
High Aud.
Montoya, a guitarist since the
age of eight, is the first performer
to work without the aid of a
singer or dancer.
He is "gitano por los cuatro cos-
tados" or literally, "Gypsy on all
four sides." He plays flamenco as
his ancestors played it "froni the
heart" or without a planned
score.
First Lessons
His first lessons were at the
age of eight from his mother, then
came lessons from a barber in
Madrid. Then came the school of
experience. At fourteen Carlos
Montoya was playing in the cafes
for such dancing artists as Juan
el Estampio. La Macarrona and
La Camisona.
When the late Antonia Merece
came to Madrid looking for a gui-
tarist, she chose Montoya who,
for the first time, left his native
Spain. He toured three years with
Merece and then went on with
other artists.
In 1945 he gave the first full
concert recital of flamenco mu-
sic, the first as he was the only
artist with a broad enough reper-
toire to entertain for a full eve-
ning.
Immediate Success
Gaining immediate success,
Montoya gave solo recitals in Eu-
rope and throughout the United
States and Canada, culminating
his tour with an appearance in
Town Hall, New York. That ap-
pearance the overflow audience
had to be placed on the stage.
Although he never plays an ar-
rangement of his without adding
something new, he has had much
of his work published in an ef-
fort to capture the Gypsy spirit
of flamenco, played by Montoya.
A daily newspaper review said
"Carlos Montoya literally stopped
th eshow with virtuoso guitar
playing that seemed to evoke the
very soul of Spain.

I

'BAD SEEING':

Clouds Hide Sun During Partial Eclipse

A partial eclispe of the sun
yesterday afternoon aroused no
excitement in Ann Arbor.
starting THURS.
through Sunday
YPSI
OPTIMIST CLUB
HOLE-IN-ONE
contest
Two divisions--men, women.
$400 prizes - woods, irons,
bags, cart, shoes, etc. Pro-
ceeds for Club's youth activi-
ties.-,
3 balls--$1.00--1-10 P.M.
at PAT'S PAR 3

Although at 5:59 p.m. 61% of
the sun's surface was hidden, a
blanket of clouds permitted little
opportunity to observe the event.I
The astronomy department took
the disappointment philosophi-
cally. Because of the vagaries of
Michigan weather, the Observa-
tory is satisfied if it can observe
50% of all local eclipses.
There can be no less than four
eclipses in any year - two of
them solar and two lunar, nor can
there be more than seven. Total
International
Center Phlis
To Host Teas
All Latin-American and Iranian
students are invited to meet visi-
tors from their respective areas at
4 p.m. today and at 4:30 p.m. to-
morrow at International Center
teas.

reception will follow in the Rackham Assembly Hall

eclipses, however, are rarer; any
one place will average only one
total eclipse every 360 years.
Scientists today study eclipses
for knowledge of the surface of
the moon, an dthe outer atmos-
phere of the sun. In ancient times
eclipses received more respect. The
oldest recorded eclipse is mention-
ed in Chinese records of the year
719 BC.
Probably the most dramatic one
was a lunar eclipse of August 27,
413 BC when the Athenian armies
of Demosthenes and Nicias were
making ready for their departure
from Syracuse.
The eclipse, occuring before the
order for departure had been
given, caused the men to clamor
against leaving the encampment.
Nicias relented and decided to
wait 27 days - giving the Syra-
cusans the chance to destroy the
entire Athenian force, and to
change the course of history.
Bach Choir Needs
Basses, Tenors
Basses and tenors are needed
for the Bach Choir which holds its
first rehearsal at 7 p.m. today in
Auditorium A.
Approximately 15 tenors and 20
more basses are needed. Audi-
tioners are welcome. Rehearsals
will also be on Thursdays from 3
p.m. to 4 p.m.

CARLOS MONTOYA
...flamenco guitar

FOR HEARING CENTER:
Foundation Funds Available
Upon University Application

~

1960-1961

HILL AUDITORIUM

Today the Center will be
to Journalists Blanca luz de
rigues from Guatemala,I

ee host
etRod-
Victor

Witty writer; star of stage,
screen and television.
"FAMOUS
LOVE SCENES"
OCTOBER 19

Carugati from Paraguay and
Mario Carneyro from Chili.
Nasser Feili, Cultural Affairs
assistant at hte United States In-
formation Service In Tehran will
be a guest at the regular Interna-
tional Students' tea tomorrow.

BURGESS MEREDITH

Distinguished actor and
director.
"SCENES FROM
BROADWAY HITS"
NOVEMBER 17
:EAU w >>p.
Brilliant French Panto-
mimist.
*. .. the greatest comic pan-
tonime program since Chap-,
lin" ... N: Y. Post

HILLELZAPOPPIN
PETITIONING FOR CENTRAL COMMITTEE
NOW OPEN.-UNTIL SUNDAY, SEPT. 25.
PETITIONS AT HILLEL FOUNDATION
9 A.M. - 5 P.M.
Don't miss this opportunity!

WMMM7

The Kresge Foundation ."has
invited us to apply at intervals for
addiitonal funds" to support the
new hearing research center at the
University Medical Center, William
N. Hubbard, Jr., dean of the medi-
cal school said yesterday.
Stanley Kresge, president of the
Foundation, Monday presentedr
University President Harlan
Hatcher with the initial $200,000
installment of the $1,750,000 ex-
pected to finance the institute's
construction. When completed it
will be the world's largest medicall
laboratory devoted to research on
hearing.
"The assumption," Hubbard con-
tinued, "is that if the funds arel
available at the time the appli-
cations will be granted."
The facility, announced Mon-l
day, will be known as the Kresge'
Hearing Research Institute and is1
expected to be completed in the
academic year 1962-63. The plan-
nned five-story addition to the
Kresge Medical Research Building
will contain special equipment for
studying hearing and its disorders,
and will be used by several bran-'
ches of the medical school for a
broad, multidisciplinary attack onl
the problems involved.
Wilbur Pierpont, University vice-1
president for business and finance,
said construction is expected to
begin next spring.
The building will have 36,000
feet of floor space. Its architects
Rackham To Host
Jewish Services
Rosh Hashonah services spon-
sored by the B'nai Brith Hillel
Foundation will begin at 7 p.m.,
tonight in the Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Conservative services will con-
tinue at 9 a.m. tomorrow in the
Rackham Lecture Hall and Reform
services will be held at 10 a.m. in
the Rackham Amphitheatre. Con-
servative services are also sched-
uled at 9 a.m. Friday in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.

are Halabird-Root & Associates
of Chicago, fll.
Kresge said Monday his founda-
tion, "looks forward to continuing
its support of the Hearing Re-
search Institute in the future."
Thieves Rob
'U' Residences
Thieves have unburdened cam-
pus buildings of more than $650
worth of furniture since last week-
end.
Under investigation by city
police are the theft of three dav-
enports and two large table lamps
from West Quadrangle, and two
large bamboo porch chairs from
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority
house.
One of the West Quadrangle
sofas, valued at $400, was reported
missing last weekend. Two more,
one valued at $450, were discovered
stolen Monday night and yester-
day. The thieves also made off
with a pair of $25 lamps.
Kappa Kappa Gamma told
police Monday that two porch
chairs worth $75 each had ap-
parently been stolen.
Set Meeting
O Conference
The Seventh Annual Conference
of the Development Council will
meet today and tomorrow in the
Michigan Union.
Following Development Work-
shops this morning, Allan F.
Smith, Dean of the Law School,
will address the council at
luncheon.
DIAL 8-6416
Feature daily at 6:45-9:05

HORACE H. RACKHAM

DECEMBER 5

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES

'''

CONVOCATION

musicals,

"ON YOUR TOES"

Wed., Sept. 21

8:00 P.M.

FEBRUARY 27

Trueblood Auditorium, Frieze Bldg.

SPEAKER

Popular American humorist
and television star.
"HERB SHRINER
ENTERTAINS"
MARCH 7

DR. LUTHER H. EVANS
Former Librarian of Congress and
Director General of UNESCO.
A reception in the Rackham Building will follow the Convo-
cation. All graduate students are cordially invited.

One of the foremost actors
of the theatre today.
"THE BEST FROM
MY BOOKSHELF"
MARCH 14

|
I

P'

J1

I-

FOOTBALL

TICKET

The
entertainment
world's most
wonderful
entertainment!

I'

I

RESALE

i

$3.00 (Complete Course, Second Balcony)

Tickets available in Union Lobby
* . c t _ At 1"1 A A

r F

I

I

I

{

i!

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan