100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 21, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAC L TIi O

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FR.TlnAV MAV 91 IGAK,

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

1U111A .LTIIZ1 OJ, 1365~

fi

CLIMAX OF LOCAL DEBATES:
Teach-In Extends Academic Involvement

!'U' Hospital To Give Students Jobs

By RITA DERSHOWITZ
and LAURA GODOFSKY
Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-In addition to
climaxing two months of teach-
ins at about 50 campuses through-
out the country, last weekend's na-
tional teach-in on Viet Nam also
set into motion an unprecedented
effort to extend the academic
community's critical involvement
with major policy issues.
At a press conference following
the 16-hour marathon, four of its
faculty sponsors announced plans
to establish an on-going organiza-
tion, consisting of both students
and fa;culty, to continue the de-
bate and discussions started by the
teach-ins.
The sponsors of the Washington
teach-in, which was broadcast on
a nation-wide telephone hook-up
to 100 campuses, also re-issued
their invitation to their principal
speaker, McGeorge Bundy, who
could not appear for the sched-
uled debate.
The confrontation between
Bundy, who is a major "architect"
of the administration's current
Viet Nam policy and a formera
Harvard professor, and Prof.i
George Kahin of Cornell was to
have been the highlight of the
day's events.
BC Flareup o
Freedom May

an unquestioning acquiescence to
higher authority."
Audience Restrained
Consisting mainly of people
from the Washington area and a
large number of faculty members
and some students from campuses
throughout the country, the au-
dience was generally restrained.
Nonetheless, unmistakeable boo-
- ing and hissing and frequent ap-
plause met many of the speakers.
Bundy came in for what was
probably the strongest expression
- of disapproval when a statement'
he sent to the teach-in apologizingI
for his "absence" was read.
His cancellation was a particular
disappointment especially in light
of the anticipation that had built,
up as a result of the very cool re-
ception that former presidential
advisor Arthur Schesinger received,
even after surprising many by:x
ated at the University last March questioning various aspects of the
ns of policy into public scrutiny administration's policy.
ontinue. Following the national Bundy's statement included a
pointed to expand this form of few jibes at the teach-in sponsors!
as well as a comment that he dis-
agrees "with those who have argu-
that function on a later date in ed that it is inappropriate for!
a nationwide television debate. government advisors to take part
in discussion of this kind."
The follow-up group will not - discussion of thi k
confine itself to the problem of
Viet Nam, nor will it be restricted RARE BOOKS:
to teach-in as its only forum for
activity. ' 71-

By ELAINE EMERMAN tion to make choices of life-long,
importance, he explained.
A project sponsored jointly by The employment open to young
University Hospital and the AnnT e mple ymsninoae nc teach-
Arbor public schools is seeking peoPle Is in areas such as teach-
from the federal govern- ing assistance, patient transpor-
suppot tation, message centers, and the
ment under the "Economic Op-x
portunities Act" passed last year. prosthetic and appliance shop
Twhere implements are made, Shra-
STraining Opportunities in Pub- ger said.
lic Service (TOPS) is one of a Classes Available
group of plans being instituted C lasses available
with the help of the federal gov- will be classes available
wih hehep fth fdealgo-in English and ri St d Ptt

ernment, Jules Shrager of the
University Medical Center, said:
yesterday.
The project will give high school
students experience in a working
situation. Shrager explained that
this is intended as a means to
raise the social usefulness of par-
ticipants.

illL lglbn iacivics. ouaen s
may join classes in the hospital
schools already in existence.
According to Robert Richards,
personnel administrator for the
medical center, arrangements will
be made with the high school for
leave of absence with credit. This
is a benefit which a regular em-

THE TEACH-IN which was initia
as a method of bringing question
and open them to debate will c
"teach-in" a committee was app
scrutiny into other areas.
Since the primary purpose of
the teach-in was to promote a
public dialogue, particularly be-
tween the government and its in-
creasingly vocal critics on the
campus, its sponsors telegrammed
Bundy inviting him to help fulfill

Drop-Out Problem Ployer could not provide, but
Automation is increasingly re- which the high community stand-
placing human labor with ma- ing of the hospital makes possi-
chines. The high school drop-outs ble.
who enter the unskilled labor mar-
ket meet overwhelming obstacles.
Thirty thousand new jobs are cross
needed each week. However, the ,
jobs do not exist, Shrager explain-#
ed.
TOPS is working with those who Cam pus
have dropped out of school. It is a
preventive activity aimed at those FRIDAY, MAY 20
who are in school and in a posi- 8 p.m.-The Comparative Lit-
erature department in the gradu-
ate school will present "Hamlet"
by William Shakespeare at Lydia
A - Mendelssohn Theatre.

t

The hospital is one of the
largest employers in the state. Be-«
ing supported by public money, it'
is appropriate that it contribute,
to the upkeep of public condi-
tions, Shrager said.
Hopeful of Outcome
Hopefully the outcome will be
an operating force to meet mo-
tivational problems by offering
students a valuable set of impres-
sions and contacts, Shrager con-
tinued. Some young people may
Health Forms
To Be Secret
Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO - In a pioneering
step, the University of Chicago
Student Health Service has an-
nounced that it will not release
mental health information about
students or former students to
anyone except their physicians.
Applications for graduate school
as well as transfer forms often
request medical information, in-
cluding mental health records. If
academic institutions insist on re-
ceiving this information, they will
now have to supply the Student
Health Service with the name of
a physician to whom the informa-
tion can be released.
"I felt that it was inappropri-
ate to give this information out,
especially on this campus where
we encourage students to utilize
the student health facilities fully,"
Dr. Richard Moy, director of the
Student Health Service, explained.,

elect to go back to high school,
some to go on with college.
The theory is that frontline en-
counters with real opportunity
multiply the chances for self-real-
izing growth. The University social
work school and the Inter-Profes-
sional Regional Commission on
Public Personnel Services are co-
operating in support of the proj-
ect.

*1
NI
4

A 1.t-- -- -..L -

By BOB MURPHY
Collegiate Press Service
NEW YORK - The campus
flareup over alleged restrictions!
on student freedom at Brooklyn
College of the City University of
New York is still smoldering ,and
could flash into a bonfire again,
perhaps in a matter of days.
The situation exploded into the
open in late March. Prof. Robert
Sitton of the philosophy depart-
ment was fired when he rescinded
the required loyalty oath in his
contract to challenge its consti-
tutionality.
Various campus protest groups
rallied behind Sitton and aired
their own grievances in the ensu-
ing publicity. Matters grew worse
on March 31 when Brooklyn Col-
lege President Harry D. Gidoense,
in a television Interview, levelled a
charge of "Communist infiltra-
tion" at the student protests.
The Executive Council, a rep-
resentative organization for ac-
tivities and clubs at the college,,
and the only student represen-
tational body, since the student
government was voted out of ex-
istence, expressed disapproval of
the president's charge.
The Ad Hoc Committee, which
had become the Student Protest
Movement, and the Executive
Council demanded that Gideonse
prove his charge.
When the council decided that
Gideonse had not backed up his
stand, they passed a resolution to
"express disapproval of the way
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student 'organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring/SummerT erm
must be registered in the Office of
Student Affairs by May 26, 1965. Forms
are available in Room 1011 Student
Activities Bldg.
'nai Brith Hillel Foundation, Mix-
er, Tues., May 25, Glick Social Hall,
Hillel Bldg., 1429 Hill St., 7:30-10:30
p.m.
Friends of SNCC, 5th anniversary cel-

TS unProtest MethodI
ver S uent A statement published by the"
Inter-University Committee for
A g in Public Hearings on Viet Nam,
O ccur A gthe teach-in's rather loosely-
organized sponsoring groups, said
that the teach-ins represent not,
he handled the entire situation." simply a protest against the con-
duct of foreign policy in Viet Nam,
The Sitton affair died down but also a protest against "the
after an investigation by the Na- way policy has been made, in
tional Student Association, but private consels beyond the reach
last week, Gideonse handed down of public debate in either Con-
a strict code of dress regulations gress or elsewhere; and the way
again. consensus has been demanded, as,

olnecuion Att racts
world-Wide A tention

1
I
A
t

SATURDAY, MAY 21
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The Compara-
tive Literature department will
present "Hamlet" by William
Shakespeare at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.

RECEIVE PRIZES
Prof. William Willcox, above,
and Prof. Bradford Perkins,
both of the history department,
have been awarded Bancroft
awards for their historical writ-
ings. The three Bancroft awards
are given by Columbia Univer-
sity.

By LANCE SILVIAN
Harriet C. Jameson, head of the
Rare Books and Special Collec-
tions department, said that the
University's collection of rare
books is world famous. People
from all over the United States
and the world make use of this
library.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

t

The collection of rare books
plays an important role in the
teaching and research functions
of the University, supplying little
known information.
The collection contains about
77,000 books including 1,300 vol-
umes of manuscripts and about
6000 papyri.
The value of these rare books
depends on several factors; age,
scarcity and importance.
The most monetarily valuable
book in the collection is an orig-
inal edition of James Audubon's
"The Bird's of America" printed in
1827-38. Costing about $1,000, it
was the first book purchased by
the University.
The department also owns a
Shakespeare collection numbering
9,200 volumes. The Labadie col-
lection contains 17,000 books, pam-

1#

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitl of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organisation notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, MAY 21
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-George S.
Odiorne, Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions, "Management by Objectives-Re-
sults - Oriented Appraisal Systems":
Michigan Union, 8 a.m.
Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin, Pau-
lette Goddard in "The Great Dictator".
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:15 p.m.
"Blue Murder at St. Trinian's," Joyce
Grenfell, Terry-Thomas, Alistair Sim,
May 21, 22, Fri. and Sat., 7 and 9 p.m.
Short, "The Red Balloon."
Doctoral Examination for ShI Haung
Quon, Mineralogy; thesis: "Geochemis-
try and Paragenesis of Carbonatitic
Calcites and Dolomites." Fri., May 21,
2045 Natural Science Bldg., 1:30 p.m.
Genera! Notices
Student Organizations: Registration
of recognized student organizations
planning to be active during the
Spring/Summer Term must be com-
pleted by May 26, 1965. Forms are
available in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, 1011 Student Activities Bldg. Priv-
ileges such as the use of the Organi-
zation Announcement column in The
Michigan Daily, use of meeting rooms
in University buildings, assignment of
Student Activities Bldg. facilities, etc.
are available to registered organizations
only.
The Rare Book Room will continue
to be closed for renovation until Tues.,
June 1. The staff may be reached by
telephone 764-9377 or messages may be
left with the receptionist, Acquisitions
Dept., Room 106 General Library.

Auto 'Manufacturer, Detroit-Attn.:
Recent grads-1. Reliability Engr., BSMEI
or IE, 0-4 yrs. prod. engrg. or qual.
control exper. 2. Grad-in-Trng., BSME
or IE. 3. Jr. Engr., BSME (B average).
Kordite Corp., Macedon, N.Y.-Senior
Market Research Analyst, degree in sta-
tistics & mktg., MA pref. 5 yrs. exper.

For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H west
Engrg.

,

in mfg. plus mktg. for indust. dev. phlets, periodicals and manu-
IBM, Office Prod. Div., Dearborn, MON., MAY 24- scripts concerned with civil lib-
Mich.-Educatioal Services Repres., Bnio Cae CoE Linde Div. -erties, monetary reforms, political
woman grad, major In1Bus. Ed., Secre- BS: E Physics, Type of Work: Res. & and social protests and economic
tarial or Office Mgmt. 1-3 yrs. teaching Dev., Design, Production and Sales, and labor history.
exper. Teach office machine techniques___- .-----_ -®
to salesmen, secretaries, mgmt. &

teachers. Some travel.
Alcoa, New Kensington, Pa.-Attn.:
Grad Students-MS applied statistics &
numerical analysis for research labs.
Math solution of scientific problems. }
City of Birmingham, Mich. - Civil
Engr. Grad, some exper. pref. All phases
of municipal engrg. des. & field work.
-1i
Dial 8-6416
"A CINEMA MASTERPIECE!
A powerful, luminous
and violent
existential thriller!
- Time Magazine

prrrrr- rr--- rrrrrrrr-ar-rarr-rrr-rr-rr-rrrrrrrr- r-
I I
* I
I I
TERRY-THOMAS
I I
* I
ALISTAIR SIM
n'
I I
* in I
* I
BLUE MURDER AT ST. TRINIAN'S U
* I
also starring Joyce Grenfell
I I
I{
r It's a famous English comedy with loads of fun and :
I
surprises. An enjoyable evening's entertainment for ;
* everyone.
I
I 1
U Also on the same program the U
| Academy Award winning color short-
1 I
* Is
"THE RED BALLOON"
I I
* U
* I
FRIDAY & SATURDAY AT 7 & 9 P.M.
IE
A I
1 U
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
* ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
* I
* U
I
rmmrrrrrrr mr mrrrrrrrrrmrmmrm rranrrrrrmrmr m urininm mm mm

i

41

-Coming Sunday
"ALL THESE WOMEN"

ebration, May 23, 8 p.m., Community
Center, Congressman weston E. Viv- Pl ce n
Ian and Prof. Gerhard Weinberg will
speak and a film will be shown to com- POSITION OPENINGS:
memorate SNCC's 5th anniversary. Import Motors, Grand Rapids, Mich.
* * * -Distribution Trainee. Immed. open-
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with ing for recent grad. Handle shipment
instruction, every Friday, 8-11 p.m., of cars to dealers in Mich. & Ind.
WAB. Exper. not req.
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept of Speech)
NEXT WEEK
THE HE RO
by Carl Oglesby
Trueblood Auditorium Fri.-Sat., May 28-29
Box Office opens Wed., May 26 (12:30-5:)

Dial 662-6264
SHOWS START AT 1 :00
2:40-4:45-6:50 & 9:00
The brave are never different-
only different looking!

l

TODAY -II :
SHIRL PETER

.3
.

s I$
si

Dial
5-6290
Can a young
U-N pilot find
happiness as
an Arab? Can a
daring young
madfrom
Manhattan
survive a
hitch in
the harem?
Can football
replace sex?

how did
happen?
Look closely.
Whoever polished off that glass of beer was a real beer drinker.
Someone who uses the swallow approach. Not a sipper. Sipping,
you see, is for wine. It's the best way to appreciate the delicate
taste of a fine vintage. But not beer.
Especially not Budweiser®. Budweiser is a hearty drink brewed
with lots of character, and the best way to enjoy it is to drink
it. (Not chug-a-lug, either ... just good healthy beer-drinker's
swallows.)
Try this. Take a clean glass ... say a twelve or fourteen-ounce
size. Rinse it out with cold water. Open a can or bottle of the
King of Beers and pour it right down the middle so that you get
a good head of foam.
Now ... take a big drink. No sips.
Good? You bet. This is how beer should taste. Budweiser gives
you a taste, smoothness and drinkability you'll find in no other

4

4

Ad

I

B'nai B'rith H illel Foundation

"SOBUCT
mUvv DD AvEI^

I

I

I i

i

11

ii -. £1331 PI~~

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan