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August 24, 1965 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S1lA Y, AlUGVST 94, 190

~G SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY JT~8DAY. AUGUST 24. tUE

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WEL COME

.

JJC: Students Judge, Punish, Pardon

U. of M.- STUDENTS
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If you steal a bike, fracture the
University's driving code or keel
over drunk in front of the Michi-
gan Union-cheer up. You will
undergo a much fairer University
disciplining process than ever be-
fore.,
The disciplinarian, the 10-
student Joint Judiciary Council,
has been around a long time. But
its mode of operation was revised
in a new constitution which just
went into effect two years ago.
This- document's emphasis is on
youth: students notify you of up-
coming judiciary action, investi-
gate you, listen to your arguments
and punish you for any misde-
meanor. They even sit on a refer-
ral group which hears your appeal
in suspension cases.
Student-Authorized
The new Joint Judic constitu-
tion was written by students. Un-
der the guidance of John Bingley,
director of student activities and
organizations, the constitution
was shaped to give "due process"
rights in possible disciplining
cases.

Nonetheless, it is still not com-
pletely administrator free. JJC is
designated by The Regents as the
body under the vice-president for
student affairs which provides "all
membership of the student body
with the facilities for adjudication
and counselling by their peers."
The judiciary body is instructed
to determine if a student has
violated University conduct regu-
lations both inside and outside the
classroom. It has original juris-
diction in making these decisions.
At Least Juniors
The 10 council members, all
juniors at least, represent both
sexes--intentionally. JJC, which
absorbed the functions of the old
Women's Judiciary Council, pro-
hibits its membership to contain
more than six students of one sex.
For the student accused of vio-
lating a rule, here's what happens:
-JJC gathers original material
on the case in addition to check-
ing up on the original complaint
which brought the student to its
attention.

-It calls the student to a hear-
ing and presents him with a writ-
ten summation of the charges. It
accepts only signed testimony
when deliberating on the case
later.
-The student is informed in
writing of the case's outcome.
--A copy of this letter goes to
the student's college and his par-
ents. He may appeal to have the
letter to his parents withheld.

In most cases, he is responsible
for a fine. And often a major por-
tion of the fine is suspended sub-
ject to a year without further,
trouble.
Recommendation
In cases involving suspension or
dismissal, JJC issues only a recom-
mendation. This is sent to a five-
man referral group (two students
and three faculty members) for
the final decision,

JJC also serves as a clearing
house for disciplining cases which
may not come within its jurisdic-
tion. Its own subcommittee refers
cases back to residence hall ju-
diciaries or other appropriate
agencies.
JJC also heads cases involving
violations of rules by groups.
These follow a procedure similar
to the dispensing of individual
cases.

a

HOMECOMING:
Fetes Break Monotony

By MICHAEL BADAMO
To break the monotony of
classes, studying and the Cinema
Guild there are, besides the week-
ly apartment parties, two major,
events which spotlight University
social life.
Homecoming and Winter Week-
end manage to mobilize a large'
portion of the student body, who
continue to outdo themselves:
every year.
Homecoming, once a time for
alumni to return for a look at the
old campus and enjoy, for a'
while, the thrill of their old col-
lege days, is now a campus wide
social event for students as well.
Mass Meeting
Early in September a mass
meeting is held to announce the
year's theme, colors and mascot.
From then until the big weekend,
this year falling on Oct. 15-16,
housing units will plan and build
massive displays and floats, each
group trying to outdo the others.
The weekend will be kicked off
with a big parade as the floats
and housing displays are judged
and prizes awarded.
An all campus dance will be
held Friday night, to be followed
Saturday by the classic football
game between the University and
Purdue. Saturday night will fea-
ture top name entertainers in Hill
Aud.
The theme of last year's Home-
coming was "Knights of Yore in
'64" and activities included such
things as the Feudal Follies fea-
turing a joust, the Pogo Crusade
and the Sorceress' Scramble. Bill
Buntin, the University's star
basketball player, hosted a pep
rally at Ferry Field following a
parade from the Hill. After a bon-
fire and fireworks on the field,
activity moved to the Intermural
for a sock hop.
After the football game against
Minnesota University President
Harlan Hatcher hosted his an-
nual alumni-student open house.
Concluding the weekend was a
concert a Hill Auditorium and
Homecoming dance at the Union.
Winter Weekend
Winter Weekend premiered last

year, replacing both Spring Week-
end and Michigras which appear-
ed in alternate years each spring.
The reason for the change was
due to the recently instituted tri-
mester system which made the,
usual spring appearance of Michi-
gras and Spring Weekend conflict
with final exam time.
Winter Weekend includes the
best of both the old celebrations.
Last year Winter Weekend
came in the middle of February
and included a dance contest, a
"skit-night" with various housing
units competing in Hill Aud., ath-
letic contests between housing
units and an all-campus dance on
Saturday night.
Last year's theme was "Five
Fifths of Myth" which explored
the more humorous aspects of
mythology.

This year's committee has not
yet been formed. It is however
expected that all the essential as-
pects of last year's program will
remain intact.
Petitioning
The general co-chairman and
various other chairmen for both
Homecoming and Winter Weekend
are selected through a petitioning
process. These chairmen make
most of the plans for the gala
weekends.
But a dozen people, who must
also attend classes, can't do all
the work. They must be backed
up by many volunteers who man
such committees as tickets, adver-
tising, decorations, booklets and
events.
Petitioning usually takes place
about a month after the weekend
but volunteers can join anytime.

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By JEFFREY GOODMAN
Editorial Director
The International Students As-
sociation's goal is better relations
among the University's nearly4
1500 foreign students and their
American counterparts.
Open to both American and
foreign students, ISA features
such programs as a world's fair,
an international week, lecture-
discussion series, smorgasbords,
afternoon teas, dances and athle-
tic events and special orientation
programs for foreign students.
ISA is run entirely by students
and, to a great extent, is financed
by them and by its programs. Be-
sides operating its own activities,
ISA coordinates those of the var-
ious nationality groups on campus
and represents foreign students in
issues which involve their in-
terests.
SGC Ex-Officio
The ISA president is an ex-
officio member of Student Gov-
ernment Council.
ISA projects include the follow-
ing:
-An annual world's fair. Na-
tionality clubs display cultural
wares and present numerous
variety shows at this event.
-The Monte Carlo Ball, an all-
campus dance held each spring.
-Lecture-discussion programs

Foreign Students Present Countries, Cultures
U.S., Foreign Students
Work Together in ISA

on matter of international in-
terest.
-ISA cooperates with other
campus groups to sponsor Inter-
national Week, during which a
variety of programs are held to
generate greater awareness of the
world among students.
-International smorgasbord.
-Social events such as mixers
-with foreign dances-at the be-
ginning of each semester, picnics
and open teas every Thursday
afternoon in the International
Center.
-Sports, centering around
matches and tournaments among
foreign students.
-A foreign student orientation
program, planned and carried out
with the International Center,
which includes mixers, tours, sem-
inars and other activities.
$1 To Belong
ISA membership is open to any
student-domestic or foreign-for
a $1 fee. Members will be able to
serve on the many committees
which plan and carry out ISA
activities.
Regular members of ISA com-
mittees are eligible to petition for
committee chairmanships and
later senior offices.
Representatives at the Inter-
national Center or the ISA offices
in the Student Activities Bldg. will
take applications for membership.

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