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August 24, 1965 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1965,

TIDE MICHIGAN .DA.ILY

TUESDA, AUGUT 24,1965 TE MICIGA A

Sororities -'Self Evaluation

r

Cooperation among 24 under-
graduate social sororities at the
University is promoted by Pan-
hellenic Association, which strives
to meet the needs of all affiliated
women.
While, each chapter is self-
governing, the 24 presidents meet
weekly to discuss the issues com-
mon to all sororities; discussions
and decisions taken at the presi-
dents' council are in turn related
to affiliates at their individual
house meetings.
Sororities have been at the Uni-
versity since the 1870's. Originally
they were social units only, but
emphasis now is toward "well-
roundedness" in campus living.
In the past year Panhel has
sponsored several philanthropy
projects, such as the clothing
drive for Ypsilanti State Hospital
and a Mitten Tree at Christmas
for Ann Arbor orphanages. In
addition, each chapter takes an
active interest in community
service, and several also contri-
bute to philanthropy projects
tponsored by their national or-
ganizations.
Active
Panhellenic was active in other
areas with IFC, for instance co-
sponsoring IFC Sing. And the
sororities participated in campus
events 1ike Homecoming and
Winter Weekend, often entering
jointly with a fraternity.
Several new programs were in-
itiated last year, such as a Hous-
ing Forum which explored the
living experience available in each
type of campus housing. An in-
formal symposium called' Issues:
1965 was begun, co-sponsored
with Assembly Association.
The first in the series featured
"Alabama: A Challenge for Civil
Rights," and the series will con-
tinue this fall focusing on current
campus and nation-wide issues.
Panhellenic also sponsored a
Books for Freedom Drive and a
Torchlight March in sympathy
with the demonstrations in Selma.
This was done through one of
the chapters, Delta Sigma Theta,
which actually organized and
carried out the two events.
Writer-in-Residence
Another student program in
which Panhellenic is actively par-
ticipating is the Writer-in-Resi-
dence project. Several organiza-
tions are bringing writer Louis
Lomax to the campus this winter
for three weeks of informal dis-
cussion and meeting with stu-
dents.

u

I

ERSITY

USICi

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SOCIETY

International Presentations for 1965-1966
CHORAL UNION SERIES

Sorority Rush... Time for Fear, Expectation and Fun

And a campus-wide tutorial
service will be established in the
fall by Panhellenic, to be open to
all freshman a n d sophomore
women and staffed by sorority
personnel.
The self-evaluation of the sys-
tem which has allowed and will
continue to allow such expansion
and change is translated into de-
cision and action at several levels
of Panhellenic. The Executive
Council consists of nine members,
and this is the first level of the
policy-making organization.
Major Decisions
The major decisions are made
by the Presidents' Council, which
includes the presidents of every
chapter as well as the executive
officers. Any issue which requires
a referendum vote then goes
through the presidents to the in-
dividual chapters.
The sorority members are often
consulted by means of an opinion
vote- on any major issue facing
Presidents' Council, h o w e v e r.
Thus every affiliate as well as
every Panhellenic representative
has a real voice in meeting the
challenge of complexity.
One of the important issues
,facing all the members of the
sorority system has been that of
discrimination in membership se-
lection. The Membership Commit-
tee of Student Government Coun-
cil has been empowered by the
Regents to enforce Regents' by-
law 2.14, which prohibits discrim-

ination within the University on
the basis of race, religion, creed,
or national origin.
The sorority ssytem has been
affected by the investigation for
several years, and has recently
taken action to deal with the dis-
crimination issue.
Representatives
First, several Executive Council
members were representatives at
the IFC - Panhellenic Big Ten
Conference at Michigan in the
spring. Here the Big Ten Pan-
hellenic delegates passed a reso-
lution stating their agreement
with the philosophy of non-dis-
criminationin membershipselec-
tion. They furtherstated that the
final decision in selecting mem-
bers should rest in the hands of
collegiate members.
After the conference, the Pan-
hel Presidents' Council voted to
uphold their delegates' position by
passing the same resolution with-
in their body.
In addition, they passed an-
other resolution stating their will-
ingness to cooperate with the
Membership Committee in its re-
quest for the submission of
alumnae recommendation forms.
The immediate goal is to gain
permission from all nationals to
submit the recommendation forms
by October 1965.
Changes in the structure of rush
have concerned the policy-mak-
ing bodies of Panhellenic for a
long time.
A c t i n g on recommendations

from the Rush Study Committee,
Presidents' Council has establish-
ed an informal rush for upper-
classmen in; the fall and a more
flexible structure for freshman
rush during the second semester.
The old restricting Honor Code
was abolished first, and contact
between affiliates and independ-
ents is no longer limited.
Sororities may pledge girls any
time after formal rush, in fact,
except that freshmen may not
receive a sorority bid until after
the winter rushing period. The
rushing periods themselves were
greatly changed, with open houses
replacing structured party sets to
allow a more informal and re-
laxed atmosphere.
The newest changes, ehacted
last spring, concern the coming
first semester rush. Both fresh-
men and upperclassmen will be
able to obtain information about
sororities at the open houses on
Aug. 31-Sept. 1.
Upperclassmen will also be able
to register for fall rush at that
time.
The first two rush sets will be
open parties, during which the
rushees will visit each house in
order to gain a total picture of
the system. Then a three-day
period of completely open rush
will follow.
The houses will plan their own
schedules, allowing them the flex-
ibility that is so necessary to meet
the increased time pressure of the
trimester system.

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, JEMARTINON, Conductor
JOHN BROWNING, Piano soloist

. Sat., Oct.

9

YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist................ ......... ..Fri., Oct. 15

CZECH PHILHARMONIC, KAREL ANCERL, Conductor.........

Fri., Oct. 29,

POZNAN CHOIR from Poland.Tues., Nov. 2
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA, ... Mon., Nov. 15

"BARBER OF SEVILLE" (Rossini) NEW YORK CITY OPERA CO.

Sun., Nov. 21

GRAND BALLET CLASSIQUE DE FRANCE ...... ....I...Tues., Nov. 23
PHYLLIS CURTIN, Soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Co..Thurs., Jan. 20
MONTE CARLO NATIONAL ORCHESTRA,....... Sat., Feb. 26
LOUIS FREMAUX, Conductor, MICHEL BLOCK, Piano Soloist

NATIONAL BALLET, from Washington, D.C...........

(2:30) Sun., Mar. 27

EXTRA SERIES

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA, GEORGE SZELL, Conductor.........

Wed., Oct. 20

MOSCOW Philharmonic Orchestra, with Igor Oistrakh, Violin soloist Tues., Nov. 16
"PAGLIACCI" and "CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA," New York City Opera Co.
(2:30) Sun., Nov. 21
RUMANIAN FOLK BALLET ................. ..... .. Wed., Feb. 16

RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist. ........................Mon. Mar.

7

Fraternities Attack Discrimination

CHAMBER ARTS SERIES

By JUDITH WARREN
Personnel Director
Diversity is the key to Univer-
sity fraternities, with emphasis
on everything from scholarship
and, service to social and ath-
letic activities.
Each of the 45 houses on cam-
pus is run largely by its mem-
bers although the facilities are
owned by their respective alum-
ni groups.,
A student becomes a fraternity
member after visiting and meet-
ing the members of houses he is
interested in. He will go through
three days of open houses -
which open a "rush" period -
and attend numerous smokers,
'dinners and other functions.
STender Bids
Whenever the fraternity de-
cides it would like to have a
student join, it will tender him
a bid, which he can refuse if he
wants. Bids may be tendered at
any time of the year after the
period of open houses.
New pledges are chosen in all-
night sessions known as- "hash."
All fraternities have, in their
constitutions, membership claus-
es. It is on the basis of these
clauses and the personal judge-
ments of the members that the
new pledges are chosen.f
The fraternity system is guided
by the Interfraternity Council, a
coordinating body with legisla-
tive, executives, judicial and ad-
ministrative powers.
Under an IFC by-law prohibit-
ing discrimination on the basis
of race, religion and creed, the
IFC membership committee was
formed two years ago. The com-
mittee seeks to arbitrate cases in-
volving discrimination in mem-
bership selection.
Last year, IFC charged Tri-
gon, a local fraternity at the
University with discriminatory
practices. The Trigon president
and members defended their

pledging practices by saying that,
although their constitution says
that they can pledge only Christ-
ian boys, no other boys have ever
attempted to join.
They further added that thq
fraternity has certain ideals by
which it is governed. It is on
the basis of these ideals that
their membership clause has been
judged discriminatory.
Final judgement has not yet
been made. Aut if the fraternity
is declared discriminatory, it will
no longer be recognized as a stu-
dent organization.
Lack of recognition is tanta-
mount to non-existence at the
University. The fraternity would
not be able to engage in "rush"
activities. It could not use Uni-
versity facilities, nor could it
give registered parties, the only
kind allowed for fraternities on
campus.
Increased Pressure
When the IFC reconvenes in
the fall, they will be faced with
ncreased pressure to end dis-
crimination in local fraternity
chapters.
Although charges of religious
discrimination have been leveled
against a local fraternity, Trigon,
last year, observers say that this
:all IFC could find itself dealing
with the bias clauses of nationals
which have chapters at the Uni-
versity.
Johon Feldkamp, assistant to
the vice president for student af-
fairs and former advisor to fra-
ternities, remarked, "There is
luite a difference between tack-
ling powerful nations and attack-
ing local fraternities such as
Trigon."
Sigma Chi
At present, it looks as if Sigma
:hi, one of the oldest and largest
college fraternities, will be in-
vestigated because of its alleg-
edly discriminatory p o l i c i e s
which have attracted national at-

tention as a result of its na-
tional's refusal to let the Stan-
ford local pledge a Negro.
After the Negro was pledged
by the Stanford local, the Sigma
Chi national suspended the local
chapter at Stanford.
Meanwhile, U.S. Commissioner
of Education Francis Keppel in-
dicated that the department of
Health, Education and Welfare
could suspend the allocation of
federal funds to Universities
where the fraternities practiced
discrimination.
He specifically referred to the
Stanford case, saying that if the
charges of discrimination are
found to be true, he would use
this case as a basis for future
action at other universities.

Although the University is not
afraid of having the sanctions
nentioned by Keppel imposed on
it, it is following the Stanford
case closely as a trendsetter,
Feldkamp remarked.
Difficulties
He commented that although
charges of discrimination have
been leveled at local fraternities,
it is extremely hard to gather
sufficient evidence to bring forth
charges.
The assistant to the vice pres-
ident for student affairs claimed
that if the charges at Stanford
are held to be valid, both Stu-
dent Government Council and
IFC could use the valuable in-
formation gathered as evidence
in local attempts to end discrim-
ination.

NETH ERLAND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA, SZYMON, GOLDBERG,
Conductor and Violinist............ ............

Mon., Oct. 18

RAFAEL PUYANA, Harpsichordist . ........ .... ...... . .Sun., Oct. 31
NEW YORK PRO MUSICA, NOAH GREENBERG, Conductor.Fri., Nov. 12
HERMANN PREY, Baritone, in a Lieder Recital............. Wed. Feb. 2

VIENNA OCTET ................... .

.. Tues., Mar. 1

I SOLISTI VENETI............... . ... .. Wed., Mar. 16
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY, THOR JOHNSON, Conductor .. Thurs., Mar. 31
SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE. Tickets for single performances on sale Sept. 10.

fifffififfi* fi # fi fi fi * *

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an automatic transmission
and parks at the gate?
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carefree ;Mobylette is the only motorbike with fully auto+,
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craftsmanship by Motobecane of France, world's largest
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W/A A"/A*ffk*

Three Performances:

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3, 8:30 P.M.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 8:30 P.M.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2:30 P.M.
Tickets on sale October 1

f ?KK

FESTIVALS
Chamber Dance Festival

Also the Student
NEW Bivele

ALBA-REYES SPANISH DANCE COMPANY...... ..... ... . Fri., Oct. 22
PAUL TAYLOR DANCE GROUP ("The Little Angels"--30 children
accompanied by professional musicians on native instruments)
(2:30) Sun., Oct. 24
TICKETS ON SALE NOW
Chamber Music Festival (three concerts)
NEW YORK CHAMBER SOLOISTS, including ADELE ADDISON, Soprano;
and CHARLES BRESSLER, Tenor...................Feb. 18, 19, 20
Ann Arbor May Festival, 1966 (six concerts)
The Philadelphia Orchestra . . . . . . . . . May 5, 6, 7, 8

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Eugene Ormandy, Musical Director; guest conductor; and

:

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