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May 07, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-07

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FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1965
~$7OO Million Viet Funds Bill

TFHE MICHIGAN DAILYV

PAGE THREE

_. _... ..... .... _ . rv aaA~ I a

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r.

Meets Little Senate Resistance

WASHINGTON P)-Propelled
by the top leaders in both parties,
President Lyndon B. Johnson'sI
$700-million Viet- Nam war fund
bill crashed through the Senate
yesterday amid cries of blackjack
tactics.
4 The Senate passed the bill by
a roll call vote of 88 to 3 after a
fixed five-hour period of furious
debate.
Senator after senator served no-
tice 'that his vote for the money
bill was not to be construed as
blank check endorsement for poli-
"cies that might bog this country
down in large-scale land warfare.
in Asia,
Senate approval of the measure
came 24 hours after the House
whipped it through by a vote of
408 to 7, and a little over 48 hours
after Johnson asked for its pass-
ge "at the earliest possible mo-
ment."
The measure now goes to the
White House for Johnson's signa-

ture .
He plans to

sign it at 9:15 a.m.

(EDT) today, the White House
said.
Voting against it in the Senate
were Sens. Wayne Morse (D-Ore),
Ernest Gruening (D-Alaska) and
Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis). All sev-
en House votes against the bill
were cast by Democrats.
The bill was passed in the Sen-
ate with the votes of 57 Demo-
crats and 31 Republicans. There
were eight Democratic and one
Republican absentees.
Morse, who led the opposition,
said the bill giveshJohnson far
more than a $700 million appro-
priation. Morse contended it gives
the President authority to wage
undeclared war ,and he predicted
it will be followed by the sending
of thousands more troops to Viet
Nam.
"The President is using this
bill." Morse said, "as a vehicle for
getting a vote of confidence for
his policies in Viet Nam out of
Congress."
The blackjack cry was . raised
by Gruening, who said he approv-
ed of Johnson's policies in the
Dominican Republic uprising but
said the President's message ask-
ing for the Viet Nam fund "sought
to give the clear impression that
a vote against this appropriation
is a vote in aid of Communism."
"This implication is totally un-
warranted," Gruening said.
"It attempts to blackjack the
senators and representatives and
to hold them up to scorn and to
brand them as less than patriotic
if they choose to differ and dis-
obey the presidential command."
Senate Republican-leader Ever-
ett M. Dirksen (R-Ill) told his col-
leagues, "I plan to stand up and
vote for the President's request.
No word of mine will ever impair
the morale of our fighting men in
South Viet Nam."
Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont) said congres-
sional approval of the measure
would uphold the President and
American servicemen in Viet Nam.

f.
:
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s

SEN. WAYNE MORSE

*House Passes
Space Budget
WASHINGTON (IP-With hard-
ly a voice raised against it, the
House yesterday passed a $5.2
billion space authorization bill in-
cluding almost everything the ad-
ministration requested.
The roll call vote on passage
was 388 to 11.
Speaker after speaker from both
Republican and Demicratic sides
1 praised the space exploration pro-
gram of the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration. A few,
expressed minor reservations.
Rep. Ken W. Hechler ,D-W Va)
;aid, "What we spend here in this
budget is going to determine the
strength of our space program in
4 the 197's ... you can't just reach
ip and take these items off the
shelf. We must begin now."

UN Argues
Privileges
Of Nations
UNITED NATIONS (P) - How
far can a regional group of na-
tions go without encroaching on
the chartered ways of the United
Nations Security Council to main-
tain world peace and security?
That has become a key ques-
tion in UN debate on the Domini-
can crisis and the decision of the
Organization of American States
to dispatch an inter-American
peace force to the Dominican Re-
public.
Soviet Ambassador Nikolai T.
Fedorenko points out that under
the UN charter "no enforcement
action" should be taken by a re-
gional organization without au-
thorization of the Security Coun-
cil. He contends that an inter-
American peace force would con-
stitute such enforcement action.
The United States, on the other
hand, says there is no question of
enforcement but simply a question
of maintaining peace and security
while a constitutional government
is being set up. Britain, National-
ist China and Bolivia have backed
the U.S. position that the prob-
lem should be left in the hands
of the OAS, with the Security
Council keeping it under review.
That's , the way the matter
stands. And it seems likely that
each member of the council and
the OAS will go on interpreting
the OAS action in its own way.
The Soviet Union does not have.
the votes to make its challenge
stick.
There has been an increasing
emphasis in recent years on the
use of regional organizations. The
council has left several Latin
American problems in the hands
of the OAS--over Soviet objec-
tions.

World News Roundup
BIRMINGHAM, England-The Conservatives held Birmingham's
Hallgreen district in a special election yesterday, reducing the
Labor Party's Commons majority to three.
The election was caused by the resignation of Audrey Jones to
become chairman of the government's Prices and Incomes Board.
* * * *
ATHENS-Greek Cypriot President Archbishop Makarios arrived
yesterday from Nicosia for talks with Greek government leaders on
the Cyprus dispute with the Turkish minority.
. * * s
WASHINGTON-The Senate Commerce Committee approved
unanimously yesterday a bill making it illegal to sell cigarette
packages in this country that do not carry this warning:
"Caution: Cigarette smoking may be hazardous to your health."
But the committee tied on an amendment by Chairman Warren
G. Magnuson (D-Wash) to suspend for three years a Federal Trade
Commission order, scheduled to go into effect July 1, requiring such
a health warning in cigarette advertising.
NAIROBI, Kenya-At least two more Kenyan students have
t quit Moscow's Lumumba University and returned home. They told
Ministry of Education officials here they believe other Kenyans may
soon follow their example.
Unconfirmed reports said four others already have done so.
Twenty nine Kenyans who returned home from Baku University
last month complained of anti-African prejudice and Communist
indoctrination which interfered with their studies.
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla.-The third-stage of a Titan 3A rocket
hurtled into space as a flying launch platform yesterday, neatly
executed four orbital shifts and unleashed a pair of satellites in an
important rehearsal for future military space missions.

LIUZZO TRIAL:
Wilkins Fate Given
To Alabama Jury
HAYNEVILLE, Ala. ( .)-Ku Klux Klansman Collie Leroy Wilkins
Jr.'s first-degree murder. trial ended yesterday and went to a Lowndes
County Circuit Court jury with a ringing denunciation of the civil
rights aims of the slaying victim, Mrs. Viola Liuzzo.
"I don't agree with it," Circuit Solicitor Arthur E. Gamble Jr.
the prosecutor, told the jury of 12 white men. "It's repugnant to me.
But she had a right to be here. She had a right to be here without
being shot down in the middle of the night.
"This was a cold-blooded middle-of-the-night killing."
Wilkins did not take the witness stand. He was brought to trial
in the March 25 slaying of Mrs. Liuzzo in a violent aftermath of the
Selma-Montgomery civil rights -

The new marine arrivals ap-
parently also come from Okinawa.
As the buildup of U.S. ground
forces south of the border con-°
tinued, U.S. jet squadrons rounded
out three months of raids oni
North Viet Nam yesterday with ai
spectacular bombing of the Phut
Van ammunition complex. A1
spokesman said direct hits blewo
up four bunkers and four others
were left burning.
The new marine landing was ins
an area of Quang Tin province ine
which there are many Communist 1
Viet Cong hamlets. Regular gov-
ernment forces in the province are9
outnumbered by Viet Cong maint
force regulars who have scored as
number of recent victories.
The landing brings U.S. marinee
ground combat strength in SouthU
Viet Nam to almost 13,000 men. c
Some 8500 leathernecks haveE
been on duty at Da Nang, site ofo
a big air base, and at Phu Bait
since last March.
The Quang Tin beach is 60 miles
south of Da Nang.
Marines Land
In Viet Nam
SAIGON (A)-Three more Unit-
ed States Marine battalions began
pouring ashore on a South Viet-
namese beach 340 miles northeast
of here today to secure an area
on which a new combat airbase is
to be built.
The marines came ashore in
landing craft. at a remote beach
in Quang Tin province, 60 miles
south of Da Nang.
Vietnamese authorities had sixG
battalions of their ownstroops in
their area and a contingent of
banner waving school girls at the
beach to welcome the marines.
"The marine battalions will pro-
vide security for the construction
of a new airfield which, when
completed, will make a contribu-
tion to the effectiveness of the
Vietnamese and other friendly air
forces," an official communique
said.
"As a further step in the pro-
gram of the government of the
Republic of Viet Nam to prosecute
the war against the Viet Cong
more vigorously, the government
of Viet Nam has requested and
the U.S. government has agreed
to deploy approximately three
battalions of U.S. marines with
supporting elements to the Chu
Lai area in Quang Tin province.

march. Defense Attorney Matt H.
Murphy Jr., in a shouting, arm-
waving, body-bending summation
that left him dripping perspira-
tion, told the jury:
There has been p r e s s u r e
brought to bear against right-
wing groups in this country .-.
you heard what the President of
the United States said . . . that
these men were Klansmen, that
they struck at night and killed
this woman.
"I'm proud to be a white man
and I stand for white supremacy,
not for black supremacy. When
white people join up with them
(Negroes), they become white nig-
gers . .
"God didn't intend us to mix
with the black race. I don't care
what Lyndon Baines Johnson says.
What in God's name are they
trying to overcome? God's law it-
self?"
Circuit Judge T. Werth Tha-
gard, in his charge to the jury,
included four possible verdicts -
acquittal; first-degree manslaugh-
ter, punishable by one to 10 years
in prison; second-degree murder,
punishable by a minimum 10
years or such additional time as
the judge cared to set; and first-
degree murder, with malice afore-
thought, with life imprisonment or
death - the penalty left to the
jury.

Labor Obtains
Steel Vote Win
LONDON (M)-The Labor gov-
ernment's plan to nationalize the
bulk of the British steel industry
squeezed through the House of
Commons last night with a mar-
gin of four votes.
The endorsement to nationalize
Britain's big steel companies left
doubts, however. The victory may
lead to a surrender by the Labor
government to rebels within its
own ranks.
Labor memberes cheered at the
result-310-306 in favor of Labor's
White Paper outlining nationali-
zation plans.
The vote was a test of parlia-
mentary opinion before bringing
in the steel bill itself-and it
hinted that the government may
have to advocate less than total
nationalization if it wants to ob-
tain some kind of control over the
steel industry.
. The key lies in the -votes cast
for the government by two right-
wingers, Woodrow Wyatt and Des-
mond Donnelly. "We made up our
minds in between cigarette ends,
you might say," Donnelly told re-
porters later.

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