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May 07, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1965

PAGE TWO "tilE MIChIGAN DAiLY FRIDAYS MAY 7,1965

Maurer Honored as
'Teacher of Year'

CANCER THERAPY?
Elving Evolves New Technique

Prof. Wesley H. Maurer, chair-
man of the journalism depart-
ment, has been named "Teacher
of the Year" by the Adult Edu-
cation Association of Michigan.
Maurer received the citation for
his services in the field of adult
education through an extension

course on "Current American Af-
fairs and World Events," which
he has taught since 1931.
His years of teaching the course
weekly in Detroit make it probably
the oldest educational discussion
group, taught by the same instruc-
tor, in the United States.
First Non-Credit Course
The course was the first non-
credit course offered by the Uni-
versity. It is now sponsored by the
Adult Education Center of Detroit
through the University, Wayne
State University and Eastern
Michigan University.
Discussing his class, Maurer
said, "We bar no subject, and the
hotter the topic the better the
discussion. There is no roll call
and there are no tests."
He reports that enrollment gen-
erally ranges from 70 to 80 per-
sons and several times entire fam-
ilies have signed up. Sometimes
the classes have gone as high as
250 persons.
The course started when sev-
eral University students suggested
the idea. "I agreed that they could
go ahead and advertise it. Amaz-
ingly 12 people showed up and
the class has been going ever
since," Maurer said.
Gull Lake
The a w a~ r d was presented
Wednesday night at the associa-
tion's annual meeting at Gull
Lake.
Maurer has been chairman of
the journalism department since
1949 and a member of the faculty
for 30 years. During his work at
the University, Maurer innovated
a n d developed The Michigan
Journalist, which is now a basic
teaching instrument for thebde-
partment of journalism and is na-
tionally circulated.
Since b e c o m i n g chairman,
Maurer has introduced a new
graduate program which offers
specialized training and education
for both domestic newspaper work
and foreign correspondence. The
program extends over a minimum
period of two academic years and
offers a professional internship
the third year on top U.S. metro-
politan newspapers.

By LANCE SILVIAN
Prof. P. J. Elving of the chem-
istry department said recently
that the study of polarographic
behavior of organic materials may
lead to new methods of cancer
therapy as well as other uses in
the field of medicine

desired conditions which allow
simpler analysis than does direct
study of the body. This is because
there are so many things going
on in the body at one time that
it is extremely easy to draw er-
roneous conclusions about causal
relationships.

The study of polarographic be-
havior of organic compounds is
supported by grants from many
institutions, including the Na-
tional Science Foundation and the
Atomic Energy Commission.

tra aGU iaacataa. Electrical Methods Nlldents up or
Polarography is used to study Electrical methodology today is
characteristics of chemical com- restricted to analyzing the me- Neyro Vote Drive
pounds by analyzing their oxida- chanism of the body. Although7
tion levels through electrical there are few uses for electrical
methods. Oxidation levels are de- therapy as a means of curing di- ollegiate Press Service
termined by the number of elec- seases, Elving predicted that there OTTAWA, Ontario - An esti-
trons a compound takes on or is a possibility in the future that mated 4000 demonstrators, mostly
loses. These are different for each scientists will find a way to use it. university students. marched past
chemical element and compound. In fact, Elving left last night to the U.S. Embassy here in support
Elving has found in his polar- attend a conference in East Ger- of Negroes struggling to obtain
ography study of organic com- many where discussion will focus the right to vote in Alabama and
pounds that uric acid, an organic on the uses of electrical methods other states in the southern
compound, reduces the growth of in biology. United States.
cancer cells. Cancer cells are pro-
duced when deoxyribose nucleic
acid, the building block of a cell,
takes on too many electrons. Thiscross C a m p us
makes the DNA produce more
cells. Since uric acid oxidizes read-
ily, Elving said, the compound
may be useful in inhibiting the FRIDAY, MAY 7 Hill Aud. Featured will be Leonard
rate of growth of cancerous cells 8:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia Rose, violincellist.
even to the point of stopping cell Orchestra, under the direction of 8:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
growth. Thor Johnson, and the University Orchestra will perform under the

Kf

,.

LANDSCAPE EXHIBITION

WESLEY H. MAURER

NSF To Help
3376 Students
Collegiate Press Service
Some 3,376 undergraduate stu-
dents will be conducting inde-
pendent research in biology, engi-
neering, mathematics and the
physical and social sciences on a
full-time basis this summer under
the National Science Foundation's
"Undergraduate Research Partici-
pation" program.
The program also provides part-
time research opportunities dur-
ing the coming academic year.
Grants totalling $1.08 million were
made to 98 colleges; universities,
and non-profit research institu-
tions for participation in the pro-
gram.

This painting by Christopher Lane is part of the current exhibition, entitled "Recent Landscapes
by Eight Americans," currently at the University Museum of Art until May 29. The 29 paintings,
included in the show, are by John Button, Allan D'Arcangelo, Robert Dash, Jan Greilicher, Aristo-
demos Kaldis, Alex Katz, Jane Wilson and Lane. The exhibition reflects the renewed interest and or-
iginality with which many painters have recently turned to pictorial use of landscape imagery. The
exhibition is part of a circulation program by the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
ADVOCATES DISCRETION:
FDA Cautions Campus Drug Users

Enzyme Action
Elving's hypothesis is that or-
ganic compounds, under polaro-
graphic laboratory conditions be-
have similarly to enzymes in the
body. Most enzymes behave as
catalysts. They speed a chemical
reaction which normally would
take a long time to completion
without being destroyed them-
selves. If the hypothesis is valid,
then studies in polarographic be-
havior will permit scientists to
find out more about chemical be-
havior in the body. In a laboratory
situation it is possible to set up

Choral Union Youth Chorus will
perform in Hill Aud. Featured will
be Janice Harsanyi, soprano,
Maureen Forrester, contralto,
Murray Dickie, tenor, Anshel
Brusilow, violin, Joseph De Pas-
quale, viola.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "The Great Dictator" with
Charlie Chaplin and Paulette God-
dard in the Architecture Aud.
SATURDAY, MAY 8
2:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
Orchestra under the direction of
William Smith will perform in

direction of Eugene Ormandy and
featuring Cesare Siepi, bass, in
Hill Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "The Great Dictator" with
Charlie Chaplin and Paulette God-
dard in the Architecture Aud.
SUNDAY, MAY 9
2:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
Orchestra under the direction of
Thor Johnson and the Choral Un-
ion Youth Chorus featuring Mau-
reen Forrester, contralto, Murray
Dickie, tenor will perform in Hill
Aud.

w

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-Using pep pills
for one or two days around exam
time does not seriously impair
health or performance, according
to a Food and Drug Administra-
tion medical officer.
On the other hand, "the use of
sedatives or stimulants to aug-
ment the pleasure-producing ef-
fect of alcohol, such as might
occur at unsupervised social gath-
erings," is extremely dangerous.
This, according to Dr. Norman
Alberstadt, could lead to "auto-
mobile accidents or impulsive
sexual assaults."
Alberstadt discussed the physi-
cal effects of using stimulants
and sedatives in a seminar of the
annual meeting of the National
Association of Student Personnel
Administrators.

way. When non-fatigued subjects
are studied, psychomotor perform-
ance is not raised strikingly above
normal," he continued.
Barbiturates have a depressant
effect on the central nervous sys-
tem and are usually prescribed to
induce sleep, or, in small amounts,
a calming effect. An occasional
user, however, reacts to a normal
dosage with excitement rather
than sedation, Alberstadt warned.
Taking barbiturates the night
before an exam would not be a
good idea, according to Alberstadt,
for "there is impairment of psy-
chomotor performance for sev-
eral hours after awakening." An-
other side effect of longer-acting
barbiturates, such as phenobar-

bital, is a "hangover," consisting
of lassitude, dizziness, and gas-
trointestinal symptoms the morn-
ing after the drug has been taken.
"Thus there is a hazard in using
barbiturates to induce sleep if the
subject is going to engage in ac-
tivities which require complete
alertness the following morning,"
Alberstadt warned.
"When taken in small doses for
daytime sedation, the barbiturates
alleviate feelings of anxiety, and
in normal subjects, produce little
if any change in psychomotor
performance. With larger doses,
such as are used to induce sleep,
a significant impairment of over-
all psychomotor function is pro-
duced consistently."

i

',

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitl of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, MAY 7
Day Calendar
Institute for Continuing Legal Edu-
cation Conference-Carl Hawkins, asso-
clate professor of law; Jerold Israel,
associate professor of law; Victor J.
Baum, Wayne County Circuit Court
judge, "Michigan Civil Procedure Be-
fore Trial": Rackham Bldg., 9 a.m.
Baseball-U-M vs. .University of Min-
nesota: Ferry Field, 3:30 p.m.
May Festival Concert-The Philadel-
phia Orchestra, Thor Johnson, conduc-
tor; University Choral Union Youth
Chorus; Janice Harsanyi, soprano; Mau-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tin only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring/Summer Term
must be registered in the Office o
fStudent Affairs by May 26, 1965. Forms
are available in Room 1011 Student
Activities Bldg.

reen Forrester, contralto; Murray Dick-
le, tenor; Anshel Brusilow, violin; Jo-
seph de Pasquale, vialo: Hill Aud., 8:30
p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Smithsonian Institute, Wash., D.C.
-Museum Tech. & Specialists to as-
sist curators, research scientists, etc.
Catalog, restore, identify & classify
museum items.. Degree not req. 3-6 yrs.
exper. or comb. educ. & exper. in art,
archaeology, geology, hist., biol. sci-
ences, etc.
American National Red Cross, Wash.,
D.C.-Radio-TV position. Male Journ.
or communications grad. 1-2 yrs. ex-
per. pref. Write spots plus other as-
pects of news.
Detroit Law Firm--Legal secretary.
Woman. BA any field plus secretarial
trng. Exper. not req. but good, office
skills. Immed .opening.
CIT Corp., Chicago-Credit & collec-
tion trainee. Male grad, Commerce, Fi-
nance, Econ. bkgd. for immed. opening.
Exper. not req. Age 20's.
Hutzler's, Baltimore, Md.-Attn.: Sen-
iors-Men & women with interest in
retailing career. Exec. Trng. Program
includes service supv., ass't. buwer, ad-
vertising, personnel, etc.
J. A. Dekuatel & Son, Inc., Long Is-
land, N.Y.-Sales Repres. for surgical
suture mfr. Will train young man with
2 yrs. college plus 2 yrs, sales exper.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

Among the stimulants are am-
phetamines, including ampheta-
mine itself, methamphetamine,
desoxyphedrine, and phenmetra-
tine. Among the sedatives are
barbiturates, such as phenobarbi-
tal, pentobarbital, secobarbital,
and amobarbital.
Under federal law, illegal de-
livery of amphetamines or bar-
biturates is punishable by a fine
and imprisonment.
Studies of - individuals who doI
not use amphetamine habitually
but who take normal doses for two
or three days show that the drug
is most effective in "mitigating
the effects of fatigue on psycho-
motor performance," Alberstadt
reported.
These studies, however, give "no
assurance that amphetamines
taken daily for one or two weeks
of hard work and a minimal
amount of sleep would be equally
effective in avoiding fatigue, or
that they are not harmful to
bodily health when used in this

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SALVATION ON
THE CAMPUS:
WHY
EXISTEITIAISM
13 CAPTURING
THE STUDENTS
by L. Glenn Grey
Rejecting the moral values
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THE SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVALS
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GEORGE WEIN Presents the 12th Annual .
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