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June 29, 1965 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1965-06-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 29,496&

. A ETT E M C I A A L YT E D Y U E 2 . 1 6

.

InterCom

Seeks

Computer

Applications

in

Education

By BARBARA SEYFRIED
The University recently joined
with eight other colleges and uni-
versities to form the Interuniver-
sity Communications Council-In-
terCom for short-to study how
new computer techniques can be'
integrated into higher education.
While this is not the first at-
tempt to establish such a multi-
school study organization, it is
the first try to maintain a study
group with such a computer-ori-
ented approach to existing disci-
plines.
The goals of this new organi-

zation are to work on several prob- cilities to become more and more
lems in colleges and universities. impersonal.

" The mushrooming growth of
new information and the corres-
ponding inability of teachers, sci-
entists and students to keep up
with current developments in their
fields.
* The influx of large student
populations with corresponding
teacher and building shortages.
* The inability of small colleges
to provide expensive libraries and
research equipment.
* Tendencies for universities
that have large educational fa-

The Week To Come:
A Campus Calendar

To work toward its goals, Inter-
Com is appointing six committees
to work on different aspects of
these problems. They will probably
be set up within the next few
months.
InterCom will also study the
various methods of organizing irk-
formation networks to help solve
the problems of information dis-
persal.
Time Lag
There is at present a consider-
able time lag between the time
research is completed in the lab-
oratory and the time it becomes,
generally available to the public.-
Spreading information over large
areas also presents great problems.
Areas which lack facilities to
maintain large libraries are at a
disadvantage because they do not
have the means to disperse in-
formation.
One of the InterCom commit-
tees will center on the biomedical
sciences, where noncomputerized
and partially computerized na-
tional information centers already
exist and where the need is acute
for rapid up-to-date information
in the prevention and treatment
of diseases.
Future Doctor
Dr. James G. Miller, director of
the Mental Health Research Insti-
tute and recently named executive
director of InterCom, pictures thet
future doctor as able to ask a
question about the latest research
in a specific medical field aid re-

ceive a detailed list of sources
through the computer.
The doctor could then decide
which article had the most perti-
nent information or let the com-
puter do it on the basis of fur-
ther information. The computer
could then deliver a copy of the
desired article.
InterCom's second committee
will work on a feasible means of
revising copyright laws. Once this
is done, books with needed infor-
mation in them may be copied
and dispersed.
Network
Eventually members of Inter-
Com hope to have a network of
computers interconnected so that
research results at one university
are readily available to a scientist
at another university although he
may not have been aware of the
research project itself when he
requested information on a sub-
ject.
Miller said he hopes that this
will cut the time lag between the
completion of research and dis-
semination of information by
making the information available
before publication.
InterCom hopes to gradually
expand membership to other uni-
versities and colleges across the
nation. According to Miller, many
have already expressed an inter-
est in the project.
A third committee of Inter-
Com will study teaching and learn-
ing systems. The committee will
develop projects relating to pro-
grammed learning, audio-visual

aids - including television - in-
structional models, and the appli-
cation of computers to the teach-
ing-learning process.
Sharing
It is hoped that by utilizing
computers, smaller colleges will
be able to share some of the bene-
fits of the library facilities of
the multiversity which the small-
er college cannot afford.
Eventually, it is hoped, ma-
chine learning methods can be
utilized in high schools insuring
a more advanced student enter-
ing the universities, but this is in
the distant future.
Another advantage seen by
InterCom of using computers is
to adopt the computer to daily
service operations. Basically it is
hoped that computers can be used
so that duplication of a student's
records in various departments
can be eliminated.
This would also cut down the
time required to find out statistics
concerning such things as the av-
erage grade point of students in
a particular course.
A fourth area InterCom will
set up a committee to investigate
is that of continuing education.
With the high rate of increase
in the amount of knowledge avail-
able, many professional people
find it difficult to keep up. The
committee will study methods for
maintaining continued education.
InterCom will also set up a
fifth committee to deal with co-

ordinating educational programs
at the collegiate, graduate and
professional levels. It is hoped to
establish a greater continuity of
subject presentation through the
educational process .
Sixth Area
A sixth task force which has
been set up will deal with medi-
cal clinics and hospitals. It will
study the use of computers and
telemetry systems in diagnosis,
monitoring of patients, automation
of clinical laboratories and main-
tenance and utilization of clinical
records.
InterCom besides establishing
task forces to consider various
problems in education will estab-
lish an information center on
communication techniques avail-
able and used at universities.
Membership in InterCom is on
an institutional rather than an in-
dividual basis. The seven other
colleges responsible for the for-
mation of InterCom are Duke Uni-
versity, the State University of
New York, the University of Cali-
fornia, the University of Illinois,
the University of Pittsburgh, the
University of Rochester and the
University of Virginia.

TUESDAY, JUNE 29
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Sol Saporta, of
the University of Washington will
speak on "Psycholinguistic Theo-
rues and Generative Grammars"
in Aud. A.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Bertolt Brecht and
Kurt Weil's "The Threepenny Op-
era" in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
THURSDAY, JUNE 1
7:30 p.m.-Prof. H. A. Gleason
will speak on "Writing Systems:
Their Form and Place" in Aud. A.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "The Threepenny Op-
era" by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt
Weil.
FRIDAY, JULY 2
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. -The Cine-
ma Guild will present "The Gold
Rush" starring Charlie Chaplin
DIAL 662-6264
FEATURE STARTS AT
1:00-2:50 4 55-6:55 & 9:05

and Mack Swain in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Bertolt Brecht and
Kurt Weil's "The Threepenny Op-
era" in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter.
SATURDAY, JULY 3
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present "The Gold
Rush" starring Charlie Chaplin
and Mack Swain in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "The Threepenny Op-
era" by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt
Weil, in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter.

$

COMPUTERS WILL HAVE new applications in higher educa-
tion. Already eight colleges, including the University, have
united to study the possible uses to which they can be put includ-
ing the dispersal of the mushrooming body of scientific knowledge.

F"

M

The University Musical Society

presents

the 1965

DAILY OFFIC-IAL BULLETIN
° l v : J. . n . .t .. . . . . : . "t W % . % . 'VW V . f . . . U a . . ..' f " . . ' n f v . r

SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
in Rackham Auditorium
(air-conditioned)
GARY GRAFFMAN, Pianist .............Wedresday, July 7
Program: Two Songs Without Words (Mendelssohn) ; Sonata in A-flat; Op.
110 (Beethoven); Variations on a Theme of Handel (Brahms); Carnaval,
Op. 9 (Schumann).

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the t'ay preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, JUNE 29
Day Calendar
Engineering Summer Conferences -
George L. West, chairman, "Nuclear
i-I

I

Ships-Engineering Principles, Econom-
ics, and Ctrrent Developments": 126 W.
Engineering, 8 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-Lawrence
Steinmetz, University of Colorado,
"Managing the Unsatisfactory Perform-
er": Michigan Union, 8 a.m.
Manufacturing in the Computer Age
Seminar--Registration, Rackham Lob-
by, 8:15 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Training Systems Institute -
Geary A. Rummler, director, "Using
the Systems Approach to Direct Train-
ing and Manpower Activities": Michi-
gan Union, 8:30 a.m
Institute on College and University
Administration-"Administrative Rela-
tionships: Two-Way Communication":
Michigan Union, 9 a.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture -
Sol Saporta, University of Washington,
"Psycholinguistic Theories and Gen-
erative Grammars": Aud. A, Angell
Hail, 7:30 p.m.
General Notices
Staff Parking Notice: New parking
permits required July 1 are available
now at the Parking Admin. Office, 1053
Admin. Bldg. and Cashier's Window,
fifth floor, University Hospital.
Proof of social security number is
necessary for payroll deductions.
Final Payment of Summer Ralf Term
Fees and Spring Summer Full Term Fees
are due and payable on or before July 6.
Non payment, payment of less than
the required amount or' late payment
will result in the assessment of a de-

Ending Tonight
PETER SELLERS
in
"BATTLE OF THE SEXES"
and
"RATTLE OF A
SIMPLE MAN"
-WEDNESDAY-
"MONDO
CANE"l
and
"PURPLE
NOON"

linquent penalty of $5 for the Half-
Term and $10 for the Full-Term stu-
dents. In addition, a Hold Credit will
be placed against your grades if your
account remains delinquent.
Payments may be made in person
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015
Admin. Bldg. before 4:30 p.m., Tues-
day, July 6.
Mail Early.
Mail payments postmarked 'after due
date, July 6, are late and subject to
penalty.
Identify mail payments as tuition and
show student number and name.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Jaakko I. Nouslainen, professor of
political science, University of Turku,
Turku, Finland, June 27-July 21.
David Moussa Ventura, senior Brazil-
ian economist, U.S. Embassy, Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, June 29-30.
Chin-jdung Chuang, chief economic
analyst, U.S. Embassy, China, June 29-
30.
David T. P. Wong, senior analyst
economist, U.S. Embassy, Hong Kong.
June 29-30.,
Hadi Benamor, senior adviser (politi-
cal), U.S. Embassy, Tunisia, June 29-30.
Seyhullah Turan, senior political aide,
U.S. Embassy, Turkey, June 29-30.
Muhammad Mustafa Sklah, Arab
counselor, U.S. Embassy, Libya, June
29-30.
Mr. & Mrs. Akira Takahashi, assistant
professor of sociology, University of
Tokyo. Tokyo, Japan, June 29-30.
Hoichi Saji, economist, Hitachi, Ltd.,
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Jajan, July 4-7.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
A. O. Smith, Milwaukee, Wis.-Vari-
ous openings including 1. Mktg. Res.
Analyst, degree plus min. 2 yrs. exper.
2. Attorney, 3-5 yrs. exper., bkgd. in
labor law desirable. 3. Programmer, de-

gree in Bus. Ad. or Math. 4. Auditor,
accountant, 3-5 yrs. public acctg. ex-
per.
Leonard Refineries, Inc., Alma, Mich.
--Sales Repres. Petroleum products ex-
per. pref. for industrial sales.
McGraw-Hill Publishing Co., Webster
Div., Chicago-School textbook repres.
Immed. opening for recent grad. Lib.
Arts bkgd. pref., teaching exper. help-
ful. Cover western Mich. territory.
Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. -
Many positions including accountant,
budget analyst, analytical chemists,
pharmacologist, chemists, scientific li-
brary cataloger, microbiologist, pathol-
ogist .etc.
Indiana Univ., Bloomington, kd. -
Photographer of Athletics. Take, dev.,
& print black & white. movies, also
still shots. Weekend travel for football
games. Interest & knowledge of ath-
letics helpful.
Wolverine Shoe & Tanning Corp.,
Rockford. Mich.-Asst. Advtg. Manager-
promotions. Advtg. or retail sales ex-
per. Improve & expand promotional
advtg. efforts.
Wisconsin State, Madison-Public In-
struction Supv.-Library Service. MA
Lib. Science or MA in Educ., major in
Lib. Sci. plus 5 yrs. in educ., 3 as li-
brarian. Equiv. comb, will be consid-
ered. Supv. school libraries. Travel re-
quired. Application deadline July 23.
* * *
For further information, please call-
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Reg-
ular meeting on June 29 at 7 p.m. in
Rm. 3-G of the Michigan Union.

SIDNEY HARTH, Violinist

Tuesday, July 13

PH ILIPPE ENTREMONT, Pianist

Tuesday, July 20

Program: Five Sonatas (Scarlatti); Sonata in G, K. 283 '(Mozart); Etudes
symphoniques, Op. 13 (Schumann); Suite: Pour le Piano (Debussy); Sonata
No. 2 in D minor, Op. 14 (Prokofierf).

WILLIAM DOPPMANN,; Pianist

Monday, July 26

Program: Sonata in D major (Nardini); Sonate Op. 27, No. 3 (Ysaye);
Sonata (Ernest Bloch); Sonata, Op. 13 (Faure); Recitativoe Arioso (Luto-
slawski); Zigeunerweisen (Sarasate).

Program: Sonata quasi una fantasia (Finney); Kreisleriana, Op. 16 (Schu-
mann); "Goldberg" Variations (Bach).

SERIES TICKETS:
SINGLE CONCERTS:

$8.00-$6.00-$5.40
$3.50-$2.50-$2.00

0

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER
(Phones: 665-3717 and 764-Z538)

IL

*

RAFAELIA CARRA BRoD 901sE R
SERGID FANTONIJOHN LEYON"EDWARD 1MLHARE

SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE OPEN
Every Wednesday for Personal Selection
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre 10-1 and 2-2 P.M.

K

i

I

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al CHI GIIM

ENDING THURSDAY
Shows at
1:00-3:30-6:15-8:50
Feature 20 Minutes Later

I

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%VA

I.

INSAID RHEX
DEROMAN HARRISON
Georg C. Scott 0 Jeanne Moreau

* Aloin Delon

1

. ..

Ill'

QIUESTION:1s
%Can I get
every money and
banking service
at one place?"
YES,;
at o
at our Bank.

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Q
T HE ROMANOFFS
GERMAN-AMERICAN CUISINE
WEINER SCHNITZEL, German Potato Salad,g
Cole Slaw, Roll & Butter . ... . ..........$.95
GERMAN MEAT PATTIE on rye, dill pickle .$.35
Try Our Famous N.Y. STRIP STEAK, 8 oz.,
Q French Fries, Garden Fresh Tossed Salad, Roll
& Butter. .......... ................$1.55
CLOSED SUNDAYS a
300 SOUTH THAYER 665-4967
OPEN 7TO 7

PRESENTS
THE COMPANY
Elis Rabb, Artistic Director

PLAY A

YOU CAN'T

A U S T I N
DIAMOND

4TH FALL FESTIVAL
PRIOR TO BROADWAY

1209 S. University

663-7151

TAKE IT WITH YOU
The funniest American Comedy!
by George S. Kaufman & Moss hart Directed by Ellis Rabb
PLAys THE WILD DUCK
The poignant dramatic classic.
by Henik -Ibsen Directed by Stephen Porter
WORLD PREMIERE!
PY RAKES
The Pulitzer Prize dramatist's provocative new play.
by Archibald Macteish Directed by Alan Schneider

NEW YORK CRITICS
HAIL. APA!
"'War & Peace' a triumph"
LIFE
"Te best repertory companyin
New York" N.Y. Daily News
"The best of our hopes...
Remarkable ... stunning."
Kerr, N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Exhilarating. mature theatre
a joy' Taubmnan, N.Y. Times
"The finest repertory company
in America." New Yorker

4
*
44
1~

1/iecome to Annrtor
MRS. ALDUS

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE September 28- November 1
.mai - --m m sa aa -ama~m~m ---mmmm~m Lm.

Subscrbe Now'

1
1

Visit us for ONE-SJI

Banking.
1
t

rop
r

SCHEDULE
I~iP I, V" 8m 21m tSPU OM 1PM I

PRICES
Sat. Mat. Series
STUDENTS: Orch. $9, $6.75
Balc. $6.75, $5.40, $4.05

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Address

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