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June 29, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-06-29

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TUESDAY, JUNE 29, 1965 TUE MiCHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Kadar Steps Down
As Hungarian Head
Quits as Premier, Keeps Party Post;
Move to 'Collective Leadership' Seen
BUDAPEST, Hungary (/)-Veteran Hungarian leader Janos
Kadar resigned yesterday as Premier but kept his job as chief of the
SCommunist party.
The government and party reshuffle apparently follows the new
Soviet pattern of collective leadership by separating top government
anid party functions.
.The 53-year-old Kadar was succeeded as Premier by his long-
time deputy, Gyula Kallai, 55, known as the chief ideologist of the
Hungarian Communist party.
An announcement by the Central Committee said Kadar was
relieved "of his duties as Chairman of the Council of Ministers in
KVorder to be able to devote his

154 DEMONSTRATORS:
Convicts Berkeley Students

JAN05 KADAR
India, Pakistan
To Leave Posts
NEW DELHI /P) - India has
agreed to vacate two contested
posts in the Rann of Kutch, the
scene of fighting with Pakistan
last April, authoritative sources
indicated yesterday.
Pakistan in return would also
vacate three posts it is now hold-
ing.
The sources said this workable
arrangement was arrived at as a
result of negotiations by British
Prime Minister Harold Wilson,
who intervened in an attempt to
bring the two warring Common-
wealth members t0 the confer-
ence table.

whole time to his duties as the
First Secretary of the Central
Committee."
Off icial sources said the re-
shuffle, affecting seven govern-
ment and party leaders, did not
mean any changes in Hungary's I
domestic and foreign policies. but
was designed to take "some bur-|
den off Kadar's shoulders." |
This was interpreted as an in-
dication that Kadar, who held the
post of Premier periodically since
the Soviet crushing of the 1956
Hungarian Revolution, was in full
agreement with the Central Com-
mittee.
Kadar's resignation and the re-
shuffle of the cabinet were an-
nounced three days after a spe-
cial session of the Central Com-
mitte omheHungarian Socialist
Kallal, the new Premier, is a
ture and Education from 1957 to
1960 and as First Deputy Premier
beginning in 1960. Bd
Authoritatve sources in Bua-
pest said Kadar's resignation as
premier had been under consider-
ation since late 1964. Kadar was
said to have postponed a decision,
vitPremier Nikita Khrushchev,
apparently to avoid creating the
semblance of "chain reaction" to
Soviet events.ecn
The Hungarian reshuffle is the
second in East Europe since
Khrushchev was ousted and his
jobs split between Alexei Kosygin
as Premier and Leonid Brezhnev
as Party Chief.
Theg fis was in Romnina fol-
Gheorghiu-Dej last March. He
was succeeded by Nicole Ceauses-
cu as Party Chief and Chivu Sto-
ica as President.
There was no Immediate Soviet
comment on the Hungarian
changes.

-Associated Press
PATTERNS OF parked taxis mark a cab strike that is crippling
two cities, Chicago and New York. Reports indicate that, al-
though visitors are extremely hampjered by the strike, private
motorists are finding driving easier. The strike is caused by a
conflict between cab companies and a branch of the Seafarers
Union,
W orldews Roundup

By The Associated Press
fo r em n t s ar ese at th
Speech movements last December,
were convicted yesterday of charg-
es which could bring a maximum
penalty of 18 months in jail and
$1500 in fines.
The verdict, plus a smaller one
against a 155th defendant posed
the possibility of guilty finding
against 485 otherse wh nagreed to
The '154 were convicted of re-
sisting arrest and trespassing and
the 155th was convicted of only
trespassing in a massive trial held
without a jury.
Banned Advocacy
The sit-in, led by philosophy
major Mario Savio, was the out-
growth of a protest against a uni-
versity rule banning on-campus
advocacy of political issues. This
rule has since been eased.
Most of the leaders of the free
speech movement were among the
155 convicted.
Municipal Judge Rupert Crit-
tenden had the 100 defendants in
court pass before him one by one
to hear the verdicts.
One-by-One
The .judge instructed the 485

who agreed to stipulations on the
edence tobegi aneone-by-one
in the afternoon. This procession
was expected to continue Into
Wednesday.
There will be probation studies
before sentencing.
Crittenden told defense attor-
neys for most of the 155 to have
their clients get signed authori-
zations from the university, re-
leasing information on their back-
grounds. In these cases, the jde
statements explaining why they
took part in the sit-in.
No Contest
In5 taddition to the 155 and th

By The Associated Press
Taxicab drivers were on strike
yesterday in the two largest cities
in the nation, New York and Chi-
cago.
In New York, cab owners claim-
ed 33 cases of vandalism they at-
tributed to the strike. Most of
these were said to involve smash-
ed windshields.
In Chicago, 6000 drivers for the
new contract being negotiated by
the Democratic Union Organizing
Committee, an affiliate of the
AFL-CIO Seafarers International
Union.
About 85 per cent of Chicago's
licensed cabs were affected, while
in New York, 7000 cabs struck-
about 90 per cent of the total
taxis in that city.

CAIRO-President Mohammed
Ayub Khan of Pakistan stopped
of talks witeier Cou En-
lai of Communist China, Presi-
dent Sukarno of Indonesia and
President Gamal Abdel Nasser of
the United Arab Republic.
. **
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
-The United States may consider
closing its three satellite tracking
public insistence that this country
cannot send Negro scientists tc
the stations.
Because of apparent growing
irritation with U.S. refusal to .co-
operate with South Africa's seg-
regation policy, Premier Hendril
Verwoerd has announced he ha
told the United States It cannol
employ Negro scientists there.

test by 91 others. They also await
sEigt cases involving juveniles
are also pending.
Of the total of 739, more than
600 are students. The number of
non-students varied because of
withdrawals from school.
Later Dates
Those not present yesterday
were given later dates for appear-
ances.
SAll 155 were acquitted of chare
dict appeared likely to be applied
to all 485 who entered stipula-
tions. Assistant District Attorney
David Duttorn said he would move
for dismissal of the same charge
agint. the 91 who pleaded no

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