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June 09, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-06-09

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WEDNESDAY, JJNE f, 1965_

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

rtn

Expand Military
Role in Viet Nam
WASHINGTON-American soldiers will fight alongside South
Vietnamese government troops against Communist guerrillas when
such combat support is requested, the State Department said yester-
day.
At the same time the State Department revealed that North Viet
Nam remains unwilling to accept President Lyndon B. Johnson's offer
for unconditional discussions.
Press Officer Robert McCloskey said the Canadian government
informed the United States of an approach made to North Viet Nam
by a Canadian government representative urging that a peace con-

KHRUSHCHEV CONFERENCE:
What Caused Premier's Fall?

*Y

EDITOR'S NOTE: Seven experts
on the Soviet Union participated in
the University's "Conference on the
Khrushchev Era and After" last
weekend. The following is the sec-
ond article in a five part series
reporting the last five speeches of
the conference. The first two were
covered in Friday's Daily.
By ROBERT MOORE
Nikita Khrushchev's fall from
power was the result of a com-
bination of economic conditions
and personal idiosyncrasies, Prof.
Alec Nove of the University of
Glasgow, Scotland, said recently.
Nove, speaking at the Friday
afternoon session of the Univer-
sity's "Conference on the Khrush-
chev Era and After," analyzed the
causes of Khrushchev's fall and
considered how the new Soviet
leadership is meeting the condi-
tions which caused Khrushchev to
fall.

The basic cause, Nove said, for
the fall was "a group of people
united on one thing-they all
believed that it was impossible to
work with Nikita Khrushchev."
Conditions
But there were four economic-
political conditions, Nove added,
which put Khrushchev in a vul-
nerable position:
-The industrial muddle in the
rapidly-changing Soviet Union;
-Khrushchev's disorganizing
ideas of "party control";
-Agricultural failures; and
-Khrushchev's double-edged
policy toward the peasants.
Now, after his fall, Nove said,
the new Soviet leadership still
faces many of the same problems.
"The new leaders," Nove said,
"have repealed those of Khrush-
chev's laws which are easy to

ference be held. North Viet Nam
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-The stock mar-
ket was battered yesterday with
its worst loss since the assas-
sination of President John F.
Kennedy Nov. 22, 1963. Trading
was only moderately heavy, which
brokers hailed as a favorable fac-
tor.
LANSING - Michigan draft
boards yesterday were ordered to
deliver 1,175 men for induction
in the Army in July. The July
induction call is the largest as-
signed to Michigan since the
buildup of the armed forces dur-
ing the Berlin Crises in the fall of
1961.
RABAT, Morocco-The North-
west African kingdom of IMorocco
appeared yesterday headed for an
era of strong-man rule as King
Hassan U assumed emergency
powers and said the constitution
must be revised.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
voted yesterday to give the Or-
ganization of American States
(6AS) a decisive voice in chan-.
neling U.S. military assistance to
Latin American countries. It
adopted a foreign aid bill amend-
ment which would transfer a sub-
stantial amount of presidential
power over military aid for Latin
American countiies to the inter-
American organization.

demanded the withdrawal of all
U.S. forces before any talks could
be held, he said.
Best Judgments
McCloskey told a news con-
ference the decision to change the
role of U.S. forces in Viet Nam
"is the result of the best military
judgment as to what is required
now and as far as we can see
ahead."
"In my view it would put Amer-
icans shoulder to shoulder with
the Vietnamese in combat opera-
tions," McCloskey said. No U.S.
forces have yet gone into a com-
bat support role, he added.
Last Saturday the State De-
partment had said the primary
role of U.S. Marines and Para-
troopers in Viet Nam is to protect
and patrol key U.S. installations.
Such operations, the statement
explained, would involve combat
with Viet Cong fighters in the
areas around the installations.
Involvement
Yesterday's announcement ap-
peared to carry the U.S. a fur-
ther step toward outright involve-
ment in ground warfare in the
South. The statement made clear
that "combat support" would not
be limited to the areas. of U.S.
installations.
The expanded U.S. combat role
led Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore),
a persistent critic of U.S. policy
in Viet Nam, to predict that
"within six months we will have
300,000 Americans in South Viet
Namn."
Morse told a news conference in
New York the move merely con-
firms that "this is an American
war now." He reiterated his belief
that the U.S. can'win battles but
not a war, in South Viet Nam.

$20 Billion Moon Race
With Russia Moves Ahead

change without changing the
systems."
Profit-Motive Industry
The new leadership is experi-
menting much more extensively
with profit-motive enterprise and
has combined agricultural and in-
dustrial control under one plan,
nullifying Khrushchev's arbitrary
separation of industrial and agri-
cultural.
The first cause of Khrushchev's
fall, the economic-industrial
"muddle," is partly not his fault.
"The condition," Nove said, "would
have existed despite Khrushchev;
it is a part of the development of
Russia to a modern world power."
But Khrushchev can be blamed,
Nove added, for his 1957 reforms,
which put the industrial situation
into a more "complete muddle."
Political Power
"Maybe one reason Khrushchev
preferred chaos," Nove guessed,
"is that then he could intervene
whenever he wanted too."
But whatever the reason,
Khrushchev quite effectively block-
ed at least one hopeful reform,
decentralization of industries. New
leaders have adopted the decen-
tralization reform, Nove said.
The second basic cause, his
"party control" measures, caused
the Soviet Communist Party to
be quite divided by 1962; the
"party control" Khrushchev tried
for, Nove said, actually ended up
to be extremely disorganizing.
The thirdcause of Khrushchev's
fall was his agricultural failure.
Nove said the premier's "predilec -
tion for campaigns" and his in-
efficient farm systems caused
drastic failures in Soviet -farm
production.
Khrushchev's attitude toward'
peasants, the fourth cause, was
contradictory, Nove said. On the
one hand, in 1953-54, he encourag-
ed peasant private enterprise and
on the other hand, later, he added
heavy taxes, restricted pasture

LINES
2
3
4

.70
.85
1.00

1.95
2.40
2.85

I

'4 35

By HOWARD BENEDICT
Associated Press Staff Writer
HOUSTON - The flights of
Gemini 4 and Luna 6 are drama-
tic evidence of the quickening
man-to-the-moon race. They've
brought suggestions the United
States and Russia pool their re-
sources, but it's unlikely there will
be a joint effort until after one
nation has won the lunar sweep-
stakes.
For one thing, both nations
have committed themselves to be-
ing first on the moon and national
pride is at stake.
U.S. pl'anning for the moon trip
is well under way, and presum-
ably so is Russia's. To try to inte-
grate rockets, equipment or even
crews would only delay the ad-
venture.
Both nations have indicated at
times they'd like to cooperate in
space, and have made a start with
the exchange of information from
unmanned satellites.
Objection
But when President John F.
Kennedy suggested before the
United Nations in 1962 the United
:"Cy:::: ': :': ' 4: ":.XJ4t:".":.M:".".t :.K..'i'.J:ttiiJt+: +

Figure 5 average
Call Classified between 1 :0
Phone 7
FOR RENT
FURN. 3 BDRM. HOUSE for summer.
Make offer. 3-5098 eves. 035
521 WALNUT. Fiurn. rooms avail im-
mediately. Rent $25-$35 month. Call
NO 8-6906. C33
CHARTER REALTY has a few select
luxury apartments for fall, 2-5 peo-
ple, Call 665-8825 for appointment to
see. 037
FOR RENT FOR FALL-New. 1 and 2
bdrm. furn. apts. Call 665-8330 after 6.
032
AVAIL. JUNE 17-AUG. 30. Attractive
ultra-modern 4 bdrm. furn. home, 2
baths, close to playground in Patten-
gill area. NO 3-5188. C34
APT., 3 RM., private bath, unfurn.,
$85 mo., East Univ. NO 2-4684. C27
3 BDRM FURN. House, small back yard.
726 S. Division. Reut-$200 or best
offer. 662-7384. 024
NO LEASE REQUIRED
Large studio, unfurn., $70/mo., includes
all utilities. Also spacious 1 bdrm.
apt., unfurn.. $95/mo. Includes all
'tilities. 663-7268. C4
815 E. ANN
1 & 2 nian furnished apts. available,
immediately and for fall.,One block
to campus and St. Joseph Hospital.
1 10 N. THAYER
2, 3, & 4 man, modern furnished
apts, for fall. Disposals, wall-to-wall
carpeting, etc. Less than one block
to campus.

words to a line.
)0 and 2:30 Mon. thru Fri.
64-0557
SUMMER SUBLET
WE NEED 2 girls to take our places in
a beautiful 4-man apt. for Term
1IIB, 1224 Washtnewa, Apt. 6. 662-
1013.- 41
1 BDRM. APT., 3 blks. from campus.
All new Danish mod. furn., complete-
ly carpeted, ideal location. 1000 Oak-
land Apts. Call NO 3-7121. U35
ARTIST'S STUDIO, $25 month for sum-
mer. Call 665-5297 after 6 p.m. U21
ONE ROOMMATE OPENING in air-
conditioned,' modern, two-bedroom
apartment near campus. Has own
balcony. Good price for term IIIB or
now. Call 662-6934. U23
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for IIIB.
5-many Forvn Apt. Call after 5:00
weekdays,, 663-2085. U.28'
WANTED-One roommate (female) to
move into cool, interesting type
apartment located across the street
from East Quad. Call NO 2-8257 after
6:30 p.m. and ask" for Barb, Doree or'
Rosaiie. People who don't like kittens
need not apply. U322
WASHTENAW-SOUTH U.
3 bedroom apt. avail. July 1
I men-$25 each
3 men-$30 each
2 men-$35 each
Call Ron, 761-2795
U21
REDUCED FOR THE SUMMER
Furnished and unfurnished for 1-4
people. Call 663-7268. U
2ND SESSION, for 2, 3 or 4, new air
cond. apt. Bargain summer rates.
Call 668-8723, 665-8330 or 665-2689. U3
4' RM APT avail. for July & Aug.
$75/mo, 1130 S. Forest, 761-1726. U44
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
second session in 4 rm apt one blk
from Angell Hall. Call 665-7836. U45

MICHIGAN DA
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISI

*IREI*S
IL.Y PERSONAL
NEED A TUTOR for statistics (Soc.,
I NGy RATES Econ., Bus.Ad.Math))? Call 665-2378.
{, RENT YOUR TV from NE.AO
(S 5 DAYS GE and Zenith portables for only $10
F per month. FREE service and de-
3.00 livery. Phone 662-5671 NOW. F
5ASTIN DIAMOND-"The best Duy on
an Engagement ring in Ann Arbor."
A :) 1209 S. University, 663-'7151.,

1 DAY - 3 DAY

rights,;
peasant

, li A 4 V l G%
and often spoke
enterprise in

.t .}"r os Yti wewrNr ry,..g.;".vynry {. .v."f " i".;pt '^'Y t .o rtSr r t'?. rr.; :. ^r,: ' + t'r."
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,;

DAILY-'OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Y

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The Daily Official Bulletin is, an
Official publication of the Univer-
sity df Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the 'eay preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organisation notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9
5 Day Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop-Geary A. Rummier,
director, "Use, Evaluation, Selection,
and Writing of Programmed Materials":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Training and Development, Personnel
Office, University Management Seminar
-Clark C. Caskey, Bureau of Indus-
trial Relations; Russell W. Reister,
Office of Staff Benefits, "Orientation
to Supervisory Practices": Michigan
Union, 8:30 a.m.
Doctoral Examination for Hal Car-
lyle Bartlett, Business Admin.; thesis:
"The Demand for Passenger Air Trans-
portation, 1947-1962," Wed., June 9, 816
Bus. Admin. Bldg., 3 p.m.

Yrrv rr srvrrrrrvrrv..vw.r rv r .."r. r. ...:.....v.v..v :rrrrv... r. r..-.r.-.r: rrrr.. r .:..rr.+..... rrrrr.. . ...........................

Doctoral Examination for John Hay-
den Woods, Philosophy; thesis: "En-
tailment and the' Paradoxes of Strict
Impsication," Wed., June 9, 2216 An-
gell Hall, 3 p.m.
General Notices
Graduate Record Examination: Ap-
plication blanks for the Graduate
Record Examination are available in
122 Rackham Bldg. The next adminis-
tration of the test will be Sat., July
10, and applications must be received
in Princeton, N.J., by June 25.
Admission Test for Graduate Study
in Business: Application blanks for the
Admission Test for Graduate Study in
Business are now avkilable in 122
Rackham Bldg. The next administra-
tion of the test will 'be Sat., July 10,
and applications mustbbe received in
Princeton, N.J., by June 26.
Law School Admission Test: Applica-
tion blanks for the Law School Ad-
mission Test are available in 122 Rack-
ham Bldg. The next administration of
the test will be on Sat., July 17. Ap-
plications must be received in Prince-
ton, N.J., by July 3.
Wanted: Students to work as regis-
tration assistants at Summer Registra-
tion, June 24 & 25. Interested students
should report to the Registration Of-

fice, Room 3501 Admin. Bldg., as soon
as possible.
Physical Chemical Seminar: Jack Lif-
sitz, Physics Dept., U. of M., "Level
Crossing Spectroscopy," Thurs., June
10, 4 p.m., Room 1400, Chemistry Bldg.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
USI Chemicals, Tuscola, III.-Engi-
neers: 1. Chemical, BSChE plus 2-5
yrs. petro-chem. or refinery exper. 2.
Mech. 5 yrs. exper. 3. Project, BSME
or ChE plus 5 yrs. exper. 4. Inspection,
MS ME ChE or metal plus 2-5 yrs. ex-
per.
Bernard Horwich Center, Chicago, Ill.
-Program Director. Grad, at least 28
yrs. exper. in educ, recreation or rel.
work. Work with young adults in soc.,
cultural & educ. activities.
Chicago Urban League, 11.-Research
Specialists. MA in Poll. Sci., Geog.,
Soc., Statistics. Handlrrace relations
research. Credit given for exper. and/or
additional training. a
State of Connecticut, Hartford -
Program Supv. for child welfare &
public assistance dept. MSW plusB3
yrs., soc. work exper. Will consider BA
in Soc. or Psych., plus 5 yrs. soc. work
exper. Applicationdeadline June 23.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

Race to the Moon,
States and Soviet Union join to-
gether to put a man on the moon,
the greatest objection came from
his own country.
The cost of the moon program.
is high. Dr. Joseph Shea, head of
the U.S. Apollo Manned Lunar
Landing Program, estimates the
price tag will be $20 billion by the
time the first U.S. astronauts
land on the moon.
Most scientists. favor sending'
men to the moon and feel it's
worth the price.
Move Up Target
Shea said continued success in
the Gemini program and early
success in Apollo earth orbit
flights could lead to a manned
lunar landing in 1968 instead of
the target year of 1969.
In developing the critical pro-
cedures for a lunar landing, the
U.S. and Russia axe running neck
and neck. But the Soviets enjoy
an edge because of the more
powerful booster rocket they have
been using operationally several
years.
The U.S. is counting on the
mammoth Saturn 5 rocket now be-
ing built and what it considers
superior manpower, technological
knowhow and money resources to
win the race.

speeches.
Earlier, Nove dismissed1
and military reasons ofl
as "nonconclusive," since,l
there are always, in anyJ

against
public
political
his fall
he said,
govern-

Campus
6F2-7787

ment, groups who would like to
take over power.
"There is no explanation," Nove
said, "for Khrushchev following
policies which he knew were
wrong."
In the case of economic priori-
ties, for instance, what Khrush-
chev said was good for the Soviet
Union and what he actually did
are vastly different, Nove pointed
out.
Priorities,
In speeches and public policies,
Khrushchev favored agriculture
over - industry for emphasis in
long term planning. But his poli-
cies had the opposite effect, Nove
said.
The same was true, Nove said,
in his professed priority of con-
sumer goods over producers' goods.
In actual practice, he tended to
expend more effort in heavy ma-
chinery and factories than on
clothes and cars.
Another Khrushchev mistake,
Nove said, was trying to impose
his same methods which he had
used on agriculture-in particular
his "campaigns"-upon industry.
Nove pointed to Khrushchev's
chemical goods industry drive as
an example.

Apartments Galore
FOR FALL: Married, 2, 3, or 4 person
apts. from $95 to $240. Campus loca-
tion, new and used buildings. Cheap
summer sublets also avail.
PATRICK J. PULTE. INC.
214 E. Huron
NO 5-9405

GRAD STUDENT looking for 2 or 3
girls to share Huron Towers Apt for
term IIIB NO 2-4204. U46
HELP WANTED
LIFEGUARD - WSI necessary. $2.00
hour. Call 426-2389. H32

.1 1

after 5 p.m., NO 3-1121

Management
eves. & Sun. 663-9064
022

Meet the Right Person
The purpose of our organization, using
established techniques of personality
appraisal and an IBM system, is to
Introduce unmarried persons to others
with compatible backgrounds, inter-
ests and ideals. Interviews by ap-
pointment. Phone 662-4867.
MICHIGAN SINTIFIO
INTRODUUTION SERVICE
STUDENT ACTIVISM and religious
commitment. . . that's the topic for
discussion at Michigan Christian
Fellowship tonight at 7:30 In room
3G of the Union. F45
IS STUDENT REVOLT the sign of a
sick generation? Watch BILLY
GRAHAM, CHANNEL 2,, 10 P.M. to-'
night. F44
WOMEN OF THE WORLD: I AM
YOURS-K.D. (and that D isn't for
Dilloway) P43
Dig UAC Free outdoor Jazz conceit,
5-8, West Park, Union if rains. F42
FOR SALEE
FOR SALE-Decca stereo record player,
very good cond. $45. Call Kahn eve-
nings 5-7 or Sunday 663-6871K. B l11-
FLIGHT TICKET to Europe June 29-
Aug. 20, will sell for $200. F. Ber-
mann, 662-2185. 1313:
KLEPPER-MASTER dichy type fold
boat complete with sail & British
Seagull outboard motor. 764-1408
days, 483-4557 eves, & week-ends. B14
SELLING OUT .
All unfinished furniture. Drastic reduc-
tions. Save money while stock lasts.
A few of our specials: Desk and chair
$14.95; 3-drawer chests $9.95; 4-drawer
chest $1195. Record cabinets, book-
cases, corner, china cabinets, book-
case headboards. Come in and be con-
vinced. Michigan Woodcraft, 113 S.
4th Ave. .B
8 x 35 SUPERIOR house trailer, 2 bed-
rooms, just like new. Colored ap-
pliances. Will deal. 665-0001 eves. B12
FOR SALE - 1965 Austin-Healey 3000
MKIII. All extras. 10,000 miles. $3300
or best offer, will sell immediately.
Call 665-2378 between 5:30-6:00. B5
BUY AND SELL THROUGH
The Cledring House
A listing service for privately
owned articles.
Autns, motorcycles, bikes, T.V.,
Hi-Fl's, furniture, cameras, etc.
PHONE 862-6574 9 a.. to 9sp.m.
ROUND TRIP flight ticket, June 29-
Aug. 20, $250, call R. Loesher eat
662-0406, 663-6857, 764-5406 or h71-
1875. B15
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD - For the return of the
SIGMA CHI international sweetheart
trophy, Call 668-7597. A'
HOUSES FOR SALE
3 BDRM. RANCH home in exclusive
area. Large rooms and closets. Large
recreation and hobby rooms. Central
air-ecnd. Fully carpeted. 2-car garage.
NO 3-5188. Y2
HOMES FOR SALE by owners, listed
with The Clearing House, 662-6574, .:
9 a.m.-9 p.m. every day. No commis-
sions on sales as we are not a
broker. Y
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'63 HONDA, 150 cc, $295. Call 665-0901
after 5:00. N22
TRIUMPH 500 cc. 1956, excellent con-
dition.Best offer. Call Jeff. 764-9300
days, 663-4086 nights. 2
JOIN the fun world of HONDA. Econo-
my performance and dependability
from $252. See them at HONDA OF
ANN ARBOR, 3000 Packard Rd., 665
9281.Z
SEE IT NOW-The '65 Yamaha with
the revolutionary new oil injection
system. No more fuss or muss.
NICHOLSON MOTOR SALES
223 S. First
HONDA 50-c110, sport model, 1800
miles, good cond, with new Buco
helmet. $235 or best offer 665-3400.
Z9
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
RENT A TRUCK
Pickups, panels, stakes, and vans.
59 Ecorse Rd., Ypsilanti, Mich.

NEW CARS

C

AVAILABLE AUG. 15 & FOR SUMMER
SUBLET-Large 3 or 4 person apts.
Also large furn, rooms. NO 2-2197 or
NO 8-8601. 017
418 E. WASH INGTON
On Campus-Half Block from Frieze
WASH I-NGTON
MANOR
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL, 1965
Apts. for 2 and 3 Men
ONE BEFDROOM & STUDIO APART-
MENTS, LUXURIOUSLY FURNISHED,
AIR ,- CONDITIONED, BALCONIES,
SOUND-PROOF CONSTRUCTION.

PERMANENT POSITION - Run our
paperback book department. Excellent
opportunity for faculty wife. Apply
at Follett's, State Street at North
University. H33
JOBS-Professional, technical, clerical,
restaurant, etc. Listed with The
Clearing House, 662-6574, 9 a.m.-9
p.m. every day. HO
FIGURE MODEL
Outdoor photo study. Experience not
necessary. For interview reply P. 0.
Box 2012, Ann Arbor. H30
MALE VOLUNTEERS wanted for sum-
mer workeamps. Tennessee, Chicago,
Cleveland,'and N.Y. state. 3 weeks to
all summer; physical labor and/or
social work. International Voluntary
Service, 1116 E. 54th Place, Chicago,
Ill. 60615. H28
SOME HOUSEHOLD help and babysit-
ting in exchange for room and board,
pleasant home, walking distance from
campus. Call NO 2-5831. H21
BABY SITTER wanted for Wed. & Fri.
nights from 7-11, must have own
trans. Call 665-7516. H27
BABYSITTING, month of July, family
with 4 children, ages 3 to 8, looking
for mature student, perhaps elem. ed.
major, to accompany them to Lake
Michigan cottage, other help in
household, good salary. 668-7312. H23
JOIN THE DAILY-See Judy Warren
at Student Publications Bldg., 420
Maynard St.
STUDENTS-Choose your own hours!
Scholarship offered! Call 761-2779
8-11 a.m. H7
21-25 yr. old girl to live with handi-
capped college student. $50 a week.
665-2482. H34

ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES

OEM

ENDING TONIGHT
DIAL 2-6264

Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Reg-
ular meeting, June 9, 7:30 p.m., Room
3-G, Michigan Union. Speaker, Dick
Morrow. Topic: "Student Activism and
Religious Commitment."
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
W shtenaw Midweek Devotion, 10 p.m.,
"THappy Birthday, Church," Vicar
Stephen Stein, speaker. All welcome.

Thursday: "QUO VADIS"

3 Times Daily at 2, 5 & 8 p.m.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech)
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
TRIPLE THREAT
An Evening of One-Act Plays
Cocteau: ANTIGONE
O'Casey: BEDTIME STORY
Ionesco: BALD SOPRANO
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre 8 P.M. All Seats 50c
Box Office Open 12:30-5:00 (til 8 p.m. performance nights)
1 U
fFREE DELIVERYI
U I
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT;
I Is
50c OFF on large
PIKDU Rone item pizza
PICKED UP OR DELIVERY ONLY
Coupon Good Monday Thru Thursday, June 7-10 s
IB
's is te season1-
ARABIA China frornC

Chi

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Fast and accurate. Call 663-
8821. Ji
USED CARS
3 CAR Family selling 2 cars, both excel.
cond., red '63 TR3B, white '61 Re-
nault. 483-5296 after 5:00. N13
1961 CHEVY IMPALA, 4 dr, hard top,
radio, P.S., P.B3., 665-2780. N24
1958 CHEVROLET WAGON, V-8, auto-
matic, power steering, good trans-
portation, $400, Dale Jeffs, 764-7286
or 665-7517. N23
'59 VAUXHALL, recently overhauled,
new tires, valve job, generator, etc.
good cond. Call 665-6975. N25
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI'S Galore!
LEVI'S SLIM-FITS-$4.25
"White," and 5 Colors
For "Guys and Gals"
Cord. SLIM-FITS-$5.98
LEVI'S STA-PREST PANTS
Never Needs Ironing
Asst'd. Colors-$6.98

PAPERBOY

The Michigan Daily needs a paperboy
for summer and fall. Ann Arbor res-
idents preferred. Call Judy at 764-
0554 or stop by the Daily, 420 May-
nard Street during the day. H35
PART TIME
12-20 Hours Per Week
National corp. will train men to deliver
advertising gifts and display work,
sales, division. Salary guaranteed 40-60
per week. Car needed. Full time open-
ings also avail. For interview, Room
212 SAB, 3:00 pm. Fri., or Call NO
2-5030. H6

NEEDED

FOR APPOINTMENT
CALL NO 8-6906

STARTS
THURSDAY

4'

RENTALS
of
TELEVISIONS,
TAPE RECORDERS
HI-FI's

All Types

Lowest Rates

Ann Arbor Radio & TV
1319 So. Univ. NO 8-7942

BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive; $7 and $10 for Rh
negative. Hours: Mon., 9-4; Tues.,
9-4; Fri., 1-7, 18-21 yrs. old need
parent's permission. Detroit Blood
Service, new location, 404 W. Mich-
igan, Ypsilanti, Mich. H29
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND/OR BOARD for men avail.
for summer excel. location, near hos,-
pitals and main campus. Stop by
Phi Alpha IKappa, 1010 E. ,.an or
phone 662-4549. E2
1 iA l6in3 ir A L *mfl*IC

EUROPEAN CARS, INC.
NEW CARS AND SERVICE
506 E. Michigan, Ypsilanti
HU 2-2175
Washtenaw County's only
authorized V.W. Dealer
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVER-Car expenses paid to drive
Chevy 11 to Minneapolis any date be-
tween June 27 to July 5. Call NO 3-
3165. Gil
WANTED TO RENT
VISITING FACULTY family (3 chil-
dren) desire furn. home for academic
year from Aug. '65 in good elem. &
junior high district. Rply Keisler,
Math, LSU, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
L4

. ....

r" 1

ENDS TONIGHT
GEORGE BERNARD SHAWlSi
Sm e

S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI'S
For Gals and Guys
"White" and Colors-$5.98

I

LEVI JACKETSI

I

It 12 LN 7_3 5' IJln.-i..wy -%

II

.. _ ... i

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